New Mexico led the way to today’s NCAA announcement that it will allow athletes to earn money.

$1.5 billion annually, that’s how much college football’s 25 most valuable teams earn in combined profit in an average year, according to Forbes‘ most recent “College Football’s Most Valuable Teams” list.

College sports generates a tremendous amount of money for universities, but college athletes have long been given little more than a scholarship in return.

Polling has consistently shown a majority of Americans believe college athletes should be paid more though, and NCAA officials have started showing support for allowing players to profit off the use of name, image and likeness, until today.

New Mexico Led The Nation

New Mexico SB 94. Titled STUDENT ATHLETE ENDORSEMENT ACT, Sponsored by Mark Moores, Bill B. O’Neill, and Antonio “Moe” Maestas passed the New Mexico Senate with 39 yes votes and 0 no votes on 2/19/21. The bill then passed the New Mexico House of Representatives with 43, yes votes and 21, no votes.  The governor signed the bill into law on 4/7/21 to take effect July 1st, 2021.

The text of the actually bill signed by the governor is available to read via the text:

The law goes into effect on July 1st, the same day that a similar law will go into effect in the state of Florida, becoming the first two states that will have the laws in effect. 

“The NCAA model is not working for the athletes who drive the product,” Lujan Grisham’s press secretary told the Albuquerque Journal following the pass of the bill on Wednesday.

New Mexico’s law includes that athletes can receive food, shelter, having medical expenses paid for by a third party, or making money based off the use of their name, image, and likeness. Meaning that athletes featured on billboards, in commercials, or in video games can now begin to make money without fear of being declared ineligible. Athletes can also hire agents to set up endorsement deals but cannot hire them to represent them in contact with professional teams.

A total of 10 state have similar laws taking effect in July based on the New Mexico model. The NCAA wants to have federal laws or its own permanent rules regarding the issue known as NIL, but was forced to seek a temporary solution rather than have athletes in some states eligible for compensation while others were not.

Without NCAA action, athletes in some states could be making money without putting their college eligibility in jeopardy while their counterparts in other states could be in danger of breaking NCAA rules.

The NCAA’s stopgap measure comes less than two weeks after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled against the association in a case involving education-related benefits. That 9-0 ruling is expected to impact issues related to compensation for athletes.

The NCAA cleared the way for athletes to profit off their name Thursday, the eve of legislation becoming the law in New Mexico and Florida that would allow for such compensation.

The expected approval from the NCAA Board of Directors came a few days after a recommendation from the Division I Council to allow athletes in every state to pursue compensation for their name, image and likeness without jeopardizing their college eligibility.

The NCAA’s stunning reversal came after California passed a Fair Pay to Play Act, which would go into effect in 2023. Other states are looking at possible legislation. The California law would allow athletes to sign endorsement deals and licensing contracts, something NCAA rule makers will address.

NCAA officials said they were aiming to have a nationwide rollout of the recommendations made among their 1,100 members.

Figuring out all the details of it, it’s going to be a challenge. It’s a much more complex issue than most people see it as. I think schools are going to be able to work through this process and come up with rules that makes great sense for the student athletes and allow universities to continue their collegiate model of athletics, NCAA Officials have said.

NCAA officials said the working group will continue to get feedback on how to deal with state legislation and that will help guide future recommendations.

A very interesting argument in favor of athlete pay was made by the New Mexico Law Review and can be found in the link below…

 New Mexico Law Review -Let’s Get Serious – The Clear Case for Compensating the Student
Athlete – By the Numbers
Neal Newman
Texas A&M University – School of Law

This move follows compliance to a New Mexico state law that takes effect July 1st. 

The New Mexico legislature found itself on the cutting edge beating out typical states such as New York, California or Washington State on a progressive approach to student athlete compensation. What is even more impressive is the bi-partisan support this bill got in the New Mexico legislature with unanimous approval by all New Mexico Senate Republicans and Democrats and example of true bi-partisanship.

The fallout to this new regulation will become a true headache for college coaches and compliance officers creating a whole new set of pressure on those professional staffs. It is conceivable with a superstar collegiate athlete whose likeness is used often could be high paid than the millions of dollars paid to college football coaches. That in itself will ultimately create an interesting dynamic that social scientist and college administrators will be studying for decades into the future. 

When it comes to sports we indeed do live in interesting times in the 21st Century. 

Supreme Court Upholds ADA for a 3rd Time

The Supreme Court on Thursday tossed out a closely watched legal battle targeting the Affordable Care Act, rescuing the landmark health care law from the latest efforts by Republican-led states to dismantle it.

The court ruled 7-2 that the red states and two individuals who brought the dispute do not have the legal standing to challenge the constitutionality of the law’s individual mandate to buy health insurance and ordered the case to be dismissed.

Justices Samuel Alito and Neil Gorsuch dissented. Justice Stephen Breyer delivered the majority opinion for the court.

As originally enacted in 2010, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act required most Americans to obtain minimum essential health insurance coverage. The Act also imposed a monetary penalty, scaled according to in- come, upon individuals who failed to do so. In 2017, Con- gress effectively nullified the penalty by setting its amount at $0. See Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017, Pub. L. 115–97, §11081, 131 Stat. 2092 (codified in 26 U. S. C. §5000A(c)).

Texas and 17 other States brought this lawsuit against the United States and federal officials. They were later joined by two individuals (Neill Hurley and John Nantz). The plaintiffs claim that without the penalty the Act’s min- imum essential coverage requirement is unconstitutional.  The court concluded they had no standing. 

To read detail of the ruling visit

https://www.supremecourt.gov/opinions/20pdf/19-840_6jfm.pdf

Thursday’s 7-2 ruling was the third time the court has rebuffed major GOP challenges to former President Barack Obama’s prized health care overhaul. Stingingly for Republicans, the decision emerged from a bench dominated 6-3 by conservative-leaning justices, including three appointed by President Donald Trump.

“The Affordable Care Act remains the law of the land,” President Joe Biden said, using the statute’s more formal name, after the court ruled that Texas and other GOP-led states had no right to bring their lawsuit to federal court.

At the time of printing no statement has been released by the New Mexico Republican Party concerning the ruling. 

The lawsuit, initially fashioned as Texas v. United States, was filed in February 2018 by 20 Republican state attorneys general and Republican governors. The plaintiffs wanted to revisit National Federation of Independent Businesses v. Sebelius (NFIB), where the Supreme Court, in a 5-4 vote, upheld the mandate as constitutional. In that decision from 2012, Chief Justice Roberts construed the mandate as a tax, concluding that it was valid under Congress’s authority to tax and spend.

The challenge in Texas is related. The plaintiffs argued that the individual mandate is unconstitutional after the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017, in which Congress set the penalty for not purchasing “minimum essential coverage” coverage to $0. That bill was adopted in December 2017 using the budget reconciliation process after Congress repeatedly tried and failed to repeal the ACA throughout 2017. Without the penalty, the plaintiffs argued, the mandate is unconstitutional. They further argued that the mandate is so essential to the ACA that it cannot be severed from the rest of the law, meaning the entire ACA should be struck down. At a minimum, they asked the court to strike down the law’s guaranteed issue and community rating provisions alongside the mandate.

The state plaintiffs were later joined by two individual plaintiffs who live in Texas and purchased unsubsidized marketplace coverage. These individuals objected to having to comply with the mandate but intended to purchase ACA-compliant coverage in 2019, even after the penalty was set to $0, because they wanted to follow the law. The individual plaintiffs were likely added to the lawsuit to bolster the states’ weak standing argument in the lawsuit—which we now know was to no avail.

Democratic state attorneys general from (initially) 16 states and the District of Columbia—led by then-California Attorney General (and now Department of Health and Human Services Secretary) Xavier Becerra—were allowed to intervene in the case to defend the ACA. These states sought to protect their interests in billions of dollars in federal funding under the ACA, to ensure that their residents have access to health care, and to prevent chaos in their health care systems if the ACA was found to be unconstitutional.

The Department of Justice (DOJ) partially agreedwith the plaintiffs and declined to defend the constitutionality of the mandate and other key ACA provisions. This was a highly unusual position: historically, the DOJ has defended federal statutes where a reasonable argument could be made in their defense. Then-Attorney General Jeff Sessions informed Congress of the DOJ’s position that the mandate was unconstitutional and that the ACA’s provisions on guaranteed issue, community rating, preexisting condition exclusions, and discrimination based on health status were inseverable and should also be invalidated. At that point, the DOJ had drawn the line there, arguing that the rest of the ACA was severable and should remain in effect.

In December 2018, Judge O’Connor, a federal judge in the Northern District of Texas, agreed with the plaintiffs and declared the entire ACA to be invalid. He reaffirmed this decision in late December when issuing a stay and partial final judgment. Many of district court’s legal conclusions, from standing to severability, were criticized by conservative legal scholars, the Wall Street Journal editorial board, and the National Review editorial board, among others. 

The Fifth Circuit

The DOJ and Democratic attorneys general appealed Judge O’Connor’s decision to the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals. Democratic attorneys general from an additional four states and the U.S. House of Representatives were allowed to intervene to defend the ACA while two plaintiff states withdrew from the case. On appeal, the DOJ under then-Attorney General William Barr took the new position that the entire ACA should be declared invalid. From there, the DOJ changed its position twice more, suggesting first that the district court’s decision applied only to the plaintiff states and two individuals, and second that the court’s remedy should be limited only to the provisions that injured the individual plaintiffs.

After oral argument, the Fifth Circuit, in a 2-1 decision, partially affirmed the district court, agreeing that the mandate is now unconstitutional. However, instead of determining what this meant for the rest of the ACA’s provisions, the court remanded the case for additional analysis on the question of severability. One judge disagreed with these conclusions and filed a lengthy dissent arguing that the plaintiffs lacked standing and that, in any event, the mandate remains constitutional and severable from the rest of the ACA. She opined that there was no need to remand, especially on severability.

At The Supreme Court New Mexico Joined The Argument the ACÁ Should Stay Intact

The Democratic attorneys general and the House appealed the Fifth Circuit’s decision to the Supreme Court. They initially asked for expedited review, which was denied. However, the Court agreed to hear the appeal on a non-expedited basis and also granted a conditional cross-petition filed by Texas, which asked the Court to uphold the district court’s decision. By granting both petitions, the Court considered the full scope of legal issues in Texas—from whether the plaintiffs have standing to whether the rest of the law could be severed from the individual mandate.

During the briefing and oral argument, 18 Republican attorneys general and governors, two individuals, and the Trump administration argued against the validity of the ACA, which was defended by 21 Democratic attorneys general and the House. The 18 challenger states were Texas, Alabama, Arkansas, Arizona, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Utah, and West Virginia. The 21 intervenor states were California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, the District of Columbia, Hawaii, Illinois, Iowa, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Nevada, North Carolina, New Jersey, New York, Oregon, Rhode Island, Virginia, Vermont, and Washington. Republican attorneys general in Montana and Ohio were not parties to the case but filed an amicus briefarguing that the mandate is unconstitutional but severable from the rest of the ACA. And a bipartisan group of governors from Maryland, Maine, New Hampshire, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin filed a separate brief arguing that the ACA should be upheld. All but four states took a formal position in the lawsuit.

Briefing was completed in mid-August, and all filings are available here. Prior posts analyzed opening briefs from California and the House; amicus briefs from nearly 40 health care and other stakeholders; opening briefs from Texas, two individuals, and the Trump administration; amicus briefs from six organizations; reply briefsfrom California and the House; and reply briefsfrom Texas and the two individuals.

Oral Argument

Oral argument was held on November 10, 2020 by the full panel of judges, including then-newly seated Justice Amy Coney Barrett whom President Trump nominated after the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. (The Texas litigation and oral argument loomed large over Justice Barrett’s confirmation process in the Senate.) All three core issues of the litigation were discussed during oral argument: whether the plaintiffs had standing to sue, the continued constitutionality (or not) of the individual mandate, and whether the rest of the ACA could be severed if the mandate is unconstitutional.

As discussed here, much of the oral argument focused on standing. Many Justices seemed troubled that the penalty-less mandate could not be enforced against the plaintiffs and that invalidation of the mandate alone would not address their alleged injuries. Many also raised concerns about the “standing through inseverability” theory advanced by the plaintiffs and DOJ. These topics were key in the Court’s ultimate decision, discussed below.

Post-Oral Argument

Following the 2020 election, the Biden administration formally changed its position in the litigation. In early February, DOJ submitted a letter to inform the Court that it had reconsidered its position and no longer adhered to the conclusions in previously filed briefs. Upon reconsideration, DOJ’s new position was that the individual mandate, even with a $0 penalty, remained constitutional: The 2017 amendment to the ACA to reduce the penalty to zero “did not convert [the mandate] from a provision affording a constitutional choice into an unconstitutional mandate to maintain insurance.” DOJ’s argument echoed the briefs filed by California and the Housebut did not address standing at all.

It is worth noting that Congress enacted the American Rescue Plan Act in March 2021. This new law expanded upon the ACA by temporarily enhancing marketplace subsidies for lower- and middle-income people through 2022. To the extent that the Court looked to subsequent congressional action, this would have showed that the current Congress believed the ACA remained sound and constitutional. 

New Mexico Health and Human Services Department estimated that over $1.7 billion in federal funding was at risk because if the Medicaid expansion went away, then that would have away too, and so underpinning all of the ACÁ is not just the coverage that people have. It’s also the money that comes into New Mexico from the Federal system.

There was also concern about people with preexisting conditions, which is a protection under the Affordable Care Act that prevents insurers from discriminating against those who have them. If it had been overturned those protections would have also gone away.

Yet serious problems remain.

Nearly 29 million Americans remained uninsured in 2019, and millions more likely lost coverage at least temporarily when the COVID-19 pandemic hit according to the Kaiser Foundation. In addition, medical costs continue to rise and even many covered by the law find their premiums and deductibles difficult to afford as inflation rises.

In response, Biden’s $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief package enacted in March expanded federal subsidies for health insurance premiums for those buying coverage. His infrastructure and jobs proposal being negotiated in Congress includes $200 billion toward making that permanent, instead of expiring in two years.

But his plan includes none of his more controversial campaign trail proposals to expand health care access, like creating a federally funded public health care option or letting Medicare directly negotiate drug prices with pharmaceutical companies. While those proposals are popular with Democratic voters, they face tough odds in a closely divided Congress.

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Alamogordo Town News History Lesson Flag Day, Flag Code and Old Glory by Author Chris Edwards

Bernard Cigrand, a small-town Wisconsin teacher, originated the idea for an annual flag day, to be celebrated across the country every June 14, in 1885. That year, he led his school in the first formal observance of the holiday. Cigrand, who later changed careers and practiced dentistry in Illinois, continued to promote his concept and advocate respect for the flag throughout his life.

But prior to that when the American Revolutionbroke out in 1775, the colonists weren’t fighting united under a single flag. Instead, most regiments participating in the war for independence against the British fought under their own flags. In June of 1775, the Second Continental Congress met in Philadelphia to create the Continental Army—a unified colonial fighting force—with the hopes of more organized battle against its colonial oppressors. This led to the creation of what was, essentially, the first “American” flag, the Continental Colors.

For some, this flag, which was comprised of 13 red and white alternating stripes and a Union Jack in the corner, was too similar to that of the British. George Washington soon realized that flying a flag that was even remotely close to the British flag was not a great confidence-builder for the revolutionary effort, so he turned his efforts towards creating a new symbol of freedom for the soon-to-be fledgling nation.

On June 14, 1777, the Second Continental Congress took a break from writing the Articles of Confederation and passed a resolution stating that “the flag of the United States be 13 stripes, alternate red and white,” and that “the union be 13 stars, white in a blue field, representing a new constellation.”

In response to the petition, Congress passed the Flag Act of 1777. It reads in the Journals of the Continental Congress:

Resolved, That the flag of the thirteen United States be thirteen stripes, alternate red and white; that the union be thirteen stars, white in a blue field, representing a new constellation.

The date commemorates the adoption of the flag of the United States by the Second Continental Congress on June 14, 1777. The flag was called the Flag Resolution of 1777 and was the first of many iterations of what would become the American flag we recognize today.

Betsy Ross Didn’t Design the Original Flag

Betsy Ross, born Elizabeth Phoebe Griscom, is widely credited with making the first modern American flag in 1776. Folklore states it occurred after General George Washington visited her home at 239 Arch Street in Philadelphia. Ross was the wife of John Ross, a member of the Pennsylvania Provincial Militia. John was killed in the early stages of the war. What is known is that Betsy Ross worked in upholstery and helped war efforts by making tents and blankets.

The story of Ross and her presenting the American flag to Washington after he gave her a sketch of what he wanted didn’t become part of “history” until 1876 at Centennial celebrations of the American Revolution. Around that year Ross’s grandson, William J. Canby, wrote a research paper for the Historical Society of Pennsylvania claiming that his grandmother had made the first American flag.

The real designer of the American flag was Francis Hopkinson, a signer of the the Declaration of Independence as a delegate from New Jersey. Hopkinson was the Chairman of the Continental Navy Board’s Middle Department and also designed a flag for them around 1777, too.

Hopkinson was the only person to make the claim of inventing the American flag in his lifetime until the Betsy Ross apocrypha surfaced a hundred years later. Substantiating Hopkinson’s claims are preserved bills he sent to Congress for his work.

According to the United States Flag Organization:

Apparently acting on a request from Congress, Hopkinson sent a detailed bill on June 6th, and it was sent to the auditor general, James Milligan. He sent it to the commissioners of the Chamber of Accounts, who replied six days later on June 12th that they were of the opinion that the charges were reasonable and ought to be paid.

Flag Day itself was first established by President Woodrow Wilson in 1914. Wilson was also the first president to recognize Mother’s Day and Father’s Day, the latter of which is this Sunday. However, Flag Day didn’t officially become established until 1949 by an act of Congress.

Flag Day is not unique to the United States and many countries have specific flag days. Dates of flag days vary across the world, but most dates were chosen to mark a significant national event like an independence day, a declaration of independence, an important military victory, the creation of the flag, or something similar to our Armed Forces Day.

Prior to Flag Day, June 14, 1923, neither the federal government nor the states had official guidelines governing the display of the United States’ flag. On that date, the National Flag Code was constructed by representatives of over 68 organizations, under the auspices of the National Americanism Commission of the American Legion. The code drafted by that conference was printed by the national organization of the American Legion and given nationwide distribution.

On June 22, 1942, the code became Public Law 77-623; chapter 435. Little had changed in the code since the Flag Day 1923 Conference. The most notable change was the removal of the Bellamy salutedue to its similarities to the Hitler salute.

The Freedom to Display the American Flag Act of 2005 prohibits real estate management organizations from restricting homeowners from displaying the Flag of the United States on their own property.

The Army Specialist Greg L. Chambers Federal Flag Code Amendment Act of 2007 added a provision to allow governors, or the mayor of the District of Columbia, to proclaim that the flag be flown at half-staff upon the death of a member of the Armed Forces from any State, territory, or possession who died while serving on active duty. The provision directs federal facilities in the area covered by the governor or mayor of the District of Columbia to fly the flag at half-staff consistent with such proclamations.

The Duncan Hunter National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2009 (Sec. 595.)allows the military salute for the flag during the national anthem by members of the Armed Forces not in uniform and by veterans.

And how it was to become named Old Glory

Old Glory!”

This famous name was coined by Captain William Driver, ship master of Salem, Massachusetts, in 1831. As he was leaving on one of his many voyages aboard the brig Charles Doggett friends presented him with a beautiful American flag of twenty four stars. As the banner opened to the ocean breeze for the first time, he exclaimed “Old Glory!” (This voyage would climax with the rescue of the mutineers of the Bounty).

Captain Driver retired to Nashville in 1837, taking his treasured American flag from his sea days with him. By the time the Civil War erupted, most everyone in and around Nashville recognized Captain Driver’s “Old Glory.” When Tennessee seceded from the Union, Rebels were determined to destroy his flag, but repeated searches revealed no trace of the hated banner.

Then on February 25th, 1862, Union forces captured Nashville and raised the American flag over the capital. It was a rather small ensign and immediately folks began asking Captain Driver if “Old Glory” still existed. Happy to have soldiers with him this time, Captain Driver went home and began ripping at the seams of his bed cover. As the stitches holding the quilt-top to the batting unraveled, the onlookers peered inside and saw the 24-starred original “Old Glory”!

Captain Driver gently gathered up the flag and returned with the soldiers to the capitol. Though he was sixty years old, the Captain climbed up to the tower to replace the smaller banner with his beloved flag. The Sixth Ohio Regiment cheered and saluted – and later adopted the nickname “Old Glory” as their own, telling and re-telling the story of Captain Driver’s devotion to the flag we still honor today.

Captain Driver’s grave is located in the old Nashville City Cemetery and is one of three (3) places authorized by act of Congress where the Flag of the United States may be flown 24 hours a day.

A caption above a faded black and white picture in the book, The Stars and the Stripes, states that ‘Old Glory’ may no longer be opened to be photographed, and no color photograph is available.” Visible in the photo in the lower right corner of the canton is an applique anchor, Captain Driver’s very personal note. “Old Glory” is the most illustrious of a number of flags – both Northern and Confederate – reputed to have been similarly hidden, then later revealed as times changed. The flag was given to his granddaughter or niece who later donated it to the Smithsonian.

So on this flag day rather you are celebrating in Alamogordo, Nashville or the beaches of California, let us remember no party and no ideology owns the American flag. The American flag is the people’s flag with a long history that is a twist of tales and reverence. 

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Bill Swartz Crossing America for Charity Stops By Roadrunner Emporium & Fine Arts Gallery, 928 New York Avenue, Alamogordo, New Mexico

Dateline: Alamogordo, New Mexico, June 8, 2021

In case you missed the jovial guy on a bike zipping around Alamogordo yesterday, you missed a man of commitment and compassion.

Meet Mike Swartz. While some people have sat back and complained during this dark period of Covid-19 and the new awakening as we come out of it, there are some individuals that didn’t just sit back in self pity but some individuals set a goal and a path forward to help the greater good of their community and followed through on that path forward in enlightenment and action.A view of Bill Swartz journey 

Mike Swartz is one of those individuals. He is bicycling across America from Harbor New Jersey to San Diego to raise awareness and funds for charity.  His solo ride of about 4000 miles in total down the east coast and across the country is to raise money for Bell Socialization Services which began in 1966 as “The Bell Club,” a social gathering for people being discharged from local psychiatric hospitals into the greater York, PA community.  Created with support of the York chapter of Mental Health America and a financial donation from the York Jaycees, early Bell programs included meals and activities hosted by churches and organizations such as the Catholic Women’s Club, the Jewish War Veteran’s Auxilliary, the Jaycees Wives, etc., as well as dances, presentations, and outings.

The organization then engaged to enrich mental health services, in 1977, programs were also added to assist individuals with intellectual disabilities , and in 1986, the agency added shelter services to meet the needs of York County’s homeless families.

Over the years Bell services continued to evolve and expand and, today, about 2,500 people are served each year through dozens of programs offering an array of housing and basic living supports, guided by our Vision, Mission, & Values. Many Bell programs are licensed and/or accredited to meet strict standards of quality care. With more than 50 properties throughout York and Adams counties, people using Bell services are an integral part of the greater community.

You can follow along the remaining parts of Mr. Swartz journey and read his commentary and blog over his encounters along the way ata variety of social media pages which are  devoted to this bicycle ride. ‍ You’ll see photos, video clips and stories about my experiences and the interesting folks I meet as I bicycle across America.
* FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/coasttocoastbicycleride/
* INSTAGRAM: @billswartz3
* WEBSITE for this COASTtoCOASTbicycleride: www.thisclearbluesky.com

We were fortunate to meet this jovial man at Roadrunner Emporium on New York Avenue yesterday. He explained his journey and his passion and moved us with his experiences.

Mr Swartz said he was attracted to the street and to come into Roadrunner Emporium as he heard John a Lennon’s famous “Imagine” being coming from the Emporium and he knew from that inspiring sound he had to check out the Emporium and the historic New York Avenue. Proving once again “music unites us.”Artist Dalia Lopez Halloway and Author Chris Edwards Photographed by Bill Swartz on His Journey

His journey reminds us all that there are good people out there, not just sitting back but taking action from the darkness to bring light to causes and issues that are important to the community and the nation at large.

Humanity is out there if we just keep our eyes open and look for it. Good luck Mr. Swartz.

And to make a donation to the charity follow the link attached:

https://gofund.me/5b660142

To learn more about the charity he is supporting visit:

https://bellsocialization.com/aboutbell/

To see a FOX News Clip on his journey visit The Fox 43 TV news  affiliates video clip that gives a good overview of this coast to coast bicycle ride fundraiser and the charity for which I’m riding:

https://www.fox43.com/mobile/article/news/local/york-county-man-biking-across-the-country-to-raise-money-for-bell-socialization/521-0da649dc-48bb-4053-a4c2-7dde9b59e747?fbclid=IwAR2XGpbTP1JN_RCTKU3wJLQ2VorxOqTvSRc3x8EIwn98XCMLIuTqHD9Q6

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Alamogordo Town News Sports Report: Alamogordo Sports: Alamogordo High Tigers Boys & Girls Win Bob Sepulveda Invitational Track & Field Meet 6/4/21

Congratulations to the Alamogordo Tigers Track and Field Boys (203 points) and Girls Team (219 Points) Winning the Bob Sepulveda Invitational Meet in competition with Tularosa, Centennial, Las Cruces, Deming and Silver. This win comes on the back of Alamogordo Boys and Girls both winning the Thurman Jordan Relays in Deming on May 28th.

The Lady Tigers again placed First Place with 219 team points

2) Centennial High School 71

3) Las Cruces High School 63 

4) Silver High School 25

5) Deming High School 10 

6) Tularosa High School 5

The Alamogordo Tiger Boys Placed First with 203 points

 2) Centennial High School 72

3) Deming High School 59

4) Las Cruces High School 45

5) Silver High School 15

6) Tularosa High School 7

Individual results supplied by Mile Split NM include…

Event 1 Girls 4×100 Meter Relay Finals
1 Alamogordo High School ‘A’ 49.49
1) Stinson, Yvonne 2) Martin, Justyse
3) Walker, Gracie 4) Adams, Rebecca
2 Las Cruces High School ‘A’ 52.22

Event 2 Boys 4×100 Meter Relay
1 Alamogordo High School ‘A’ 44.95
1) Moser, Landon 2) Kotter, Gabe
3) Gilbert, Harlon 4) Sell, Zack
2 Deming High School ‘A’ 47.06
1) Reyna, Fabian 2) Au, Esau
3) Villegas, Gabriel 4) Ramirez, Cesar

Event 3 Girls 800 Meter Run
1 Battle, Ellary Alamogordo H 2:21.29
2 Najar, Vanesa Alamogordo H 2:34.68
3 Shaklee, Janae Alamogordo H 2:36.59
4 Soe, Saung Alamogordo H 2:44.41
5 Armendariz, Lauren Silver High 2:52.79
6 Romero, Miranda Las Cruces H 2:56.13
7 Guzman, Valerie Centennial H 3:01.76
8 Santistevan, Kathleen Deming High 3:04.98
9 Marjmelejo, Valeria Las Cruces H 3:09.87
10 Cardoza, Clorinda Centennial H 3:17.19
11 Trujillo, Arianna Centennial H 3:27.39

Event 4 Boys 800 Meter Run
1 Garcia, Celso Alamogordo H 2:05.81
2 Aguilar, Daniel Deming High 2:11.42
3 Enriquez, Omar Alamogordo H 2:13.86
4 Dalmas, Isaiah Alamogordo H 2:18.30
5 Bernal, Eric Las Cruces H 2:19.95
6 Lara, Aaron Centennial H 2:22.28
7 Ball, Evan Centennial H 2:34.82
8 Hibpshman, Jared Alamogordo H 2:43.90
9 Leuenberger, Jonathan Centennial H 3:21.24

Event 5 Girls 100 Meter Hurdles
1 Duchene, Kaelan Alamogordo H 16.60 2
2 Bates, Trezure Alamogordo H 18.09 2
3 Riordan, Anna Alamogordo H 18.19 2
4 Leal, Ayanna Centennial H 18.26 2
5 Handley, Billie Las Cruces H 20.27 1
6 Contreras, Nikki Las Cruces H 20.56 1
7 Castillo, Juliana Alamogordo H 21.90 1

Event 6 Boys 110 Meter Hurdles
1 Sell, Zack Alamogordo H 16.69
2 Kotter, Gabe Alamogordo H 16.84
3 Mcrae, Crystan Las Cruces H 17.17
4 Hernandez, Daniel Centennial H 18.19
5 Mitchell, Aiden Centennial H 19.59
6 Sell, Matthew Alamogordo H 19.70
7 Madrid, Diego Silver High 19.92

Event 7 Girls 100 Meter Dash
1 Martin, Justyse Alamogordo H 12.69 2
2 Alexander, Leih’Asiyah Silver High 13.78 2
3 Thomas, Sydney Alamogordo H 13.83 2
4 Adams, Rebecca Alamogordo H 13.93 2
5 Barrio, Audrey Centennial H 14.34 2
6 Navarette, Janessa Centennial H 14.45 1
7 Woffard, Isabella Las Cruces H 14.52 1
8 Misquez, Kaley Silver High 14.83 1
9 Walker, Arriana Alamogordo H 14.87 1
10 Ocampo, Lauren Centennial H 15.28 2
11 Reinhold, Delia Las Cruces H 15.75 1
12 Sedor, Khrystal Centennial H 16.11 1
13 Rojas, Alyssa Las Cruces H 19.82 1

Event 8 Boys 100 Meter Dash
1 Johnson, Derrik Las Cruces H 11.47 3
2 Gilbert, Harlon Alamogordo H 11.53 3
3 Reyna, Fabian Deming High 11.81 3
4 Baeza, Isaac Deming High 12.11 1
5 Parra, Jose Silver High 12.21 3
6 Chacon, Josiah Silver High 12.37 1
7 Madrid, Richie Las Cruces H 12.41 2
8 Abeyta, Isaiah Centennial H 12.44 2
9 Mediola, Napu Alamogordo H 12.50 3
10 Ocoha, Jesus Alamogordo H 12.62 1
11 Vasquez, Ricky Silver High 12.66 2
12 Bitar, Juan Centennial H 12.68 2
13 Ortega, Israel Tularosa Hig 12.70 3
13 Moser, Landon Alamogordo H 12.70 3
15 Villegas, Gabriel Deming High 12.84 2
16 Rios, Joshua Silver High 13.07 1
17 Gibson, Whitney Centennial H 13.69 2
18 Fort, Craig Centennial H 14.07 2

Event 9 Girls 1600 Meter Run
1 Battle, Ellary Alamogordo H 5:37.37
2 Green, Lindsey Silver High 5:49.09
3 Shaklee, Janae Alamogordo H 5:57.92
4 Hoyle, Deianira Centennial H 6:05.25
5 Santistevan, Kathleen Deming High 7:33.56

Event 10 Boys 1600 Meter Run
1 Garcia, Celso Alamogordo H 4:41.13
2 Rogers, Colton Silver High 4:55.34
3 Rios, Dax Centennial H 5:00.11
4 Avila, Angel Alamogordo H 5:11.95
5 Gagnon, Michael Alamogordo H 5:17.37
6 Hallbeck, Jack Alamogordo H 5:35.68
7 Ball, Evan Centennial H 5:45.60
8 Lara, Aaron Centennial H 5:50.40

Event 11 Girls 4×200 Meter Relay
1 Alamogordo High School ‘A’ 1:50.76
1) Duchene, Kaelan 2) Sandoval, Gabi
3) Shaw, Haley 4) Thomas, Sydney
2 Las Cruces High School ‘A’ 1:59.63
1) Cylear, Katrina 2) Noopila, Maija
3) Reinhold, Delia 4) Sneed, Madison

Event 12 Boys 4×200 Meter Relay
1 Alamogordo High School ‘A’ 1:36.34
1) Moser, Landon 2) Sell, Zack
3) Dalmas, Isaiah 4) Mediola, Napu
2 Deming High School ‘A’ 1:41.95
1) Villegas, Gabriel 2) Hofacket, Charlie
3) Baeza, Isaac 4) Ramirez, Cesar
3 Centennial High School ‘A’ 1:43.55
1) Bitar, Oscar 2) Lundien, Deven
3) Lara, Nathan 4) Mayers, Julian

Event 13 Girls 400 Meter Dash
1 Barrera, Isabella Las Cruces H 1:02.12 2
2 Reinhold, Alegra Las Cruces H 1:02.29 2
3 Walker, Gracie Alamogordo H 1:04.32 2
4 Neilson, Michaela Alamogordo H 1:04.42 2
5 Gunn, Devyn Centennial H 1:04.91 2
6 Gerou, Eva Alamogordo H 1:06.22 2
7 Esquero, Alyssa Alamogordo H 1:09.37 2
8 Navarette, Janessa Centennial H 1:11.20 1
9 Armendariz, Lauren Silver High 1:11.24 1
10 Miller, Zia Las Cruces H 1:13.25 1
11 Goff, Sailer Tularosa Hig 1:15.92 1
12 Amador, Catrianna Centennial H 1:22.12 1
13 Skinner, Hannah Silver High 1:27.40 1

Event 14 Boys 400 Meter Dash
1 Barraza, Ezequiel Alamogordo H 53.29 3
2 Au, Esau Deming High 53.75 3
3 Kepfer, Aiden Alamogordo H 54.51 2
4 Enriquez, Omar Alamogordo H 54.64 3
5 Reyna, Fabian Deming High 55.04 3
6 Fort, Craig Centennial H 55.21 2
7 Aguilar, Daniel Deming High 55.51 3
8 Bernal, Ivan Alamogordo H 55.92 2
9 Reyes, Isaiah Tularosa Hig 56.93 1
10 Ortega, Israel Tularosa Hig 57.13 3
11 Barraza, Matthew Tularosa Hig 57.67 1
12 Bryant, Ricky Tularosa Hig 58.26 2
13 Weir, Levi Las Cruces H 58.99 1
14 Ortiz, Christian Centennial H 59.26 2
15 Herrera, Marcus Centennial H 59.46 1
16 Sedor, Paul Centennial H 1:02.24 3

Event 15 Girls 300 Meter Hurdles
1 Duchene, Kaelan Alamogordo H 47.85 2
2 Sandoval, Gabi Alamogordo H 52.69 2
3 Castillo, Evelyn Alamogordo H 55.57 2
4 Harrison, Syella Centennial H 56.35 2
5 Leal, Ayanna Centennial H 57.43 2
6 Handley, Billie Las Cruces H 59.28 1
7 Woffard, Isabella Las Cruces H 1:03.26 1
8 Fillmore, Marie Alamogordo H 1:04.83 1

Event 16 Boys 300 Meter Hurdles
1 Kotter, Gabe Alamogordo H 42.14 2
2 Mcrae, Crystan Las Cruces H 43.61 2
3 Sell, Zack Alamogordo H 44.20 2
4 Mitchell, Aiden Centennial H 46.39 2
5 Baeza, Isaac Deming High 46.55 2
6 Hernandez, Daniel Centennial H 47.01 2
7 Sifuentes, JonHenry Alamogordo H 48.89 1
8 Sell, Matthew Alamogordo H 48.91 1
9 Madrid, Diego Silver High 50.79 1

Event 17 Girls 1600 Sprint Medley
1 Las Cruces High School ‘A’ 4:46.28
1) Reinhold, Alegra 2) Gutierrez, Linette
3) Romero, Miranda 4)
2 Alamogordo High School ‘A’ 4:49.34
1) Riordan, Anna 2) Esquero, Alyssa
3) Koehler, Lynley 4) Soe, Saung

Event 18 Boys 1600 Sprint Medley
1 Las Cruces High School ‘A’ 3:49.03
1) Madrid, Richie 2) Lucero, Nicolas
3) Saiz, Zack 4) Hadley, Thomas
2 Alamogordo High School ‘A’ 4:05.92
1) Dalmas, Isaiah 2) Enriquez, Omar
3) Holt, Wyatt 4) Bond, Thomas

Event 19 Girls 200 Meter Dash
1 Martin, Justyse Alamogordo H 26.03 3
2 Stinson, Yvonne Alamogordo H 26.12 3
3 Gunn, Devyn Centennial H 27.95 3
4 Walker, Gracie Alamogordo H 28.47 3
5 Alexander, Leih’Asiyah Silver High 28.60 3
6 Barrio, Audrey Centennial H 29.28 3
7 Ocampo, Lauren Centennial H 29.37 2
8 Misquez, Kaley Silver High 31.27 2
9 Duran, Hailey Tularosa Hig 31.41 2
10 Reinhold, Delia Las Cruces H 32.86 2
11 Goff, Sailer Tularosa Hig 33.59 2
12 Sedor, Khrystal Centennial H 34.68 1
13 Wooldridge, Emily Alamogordo H 35.41 1
14 Rojas, Alyssa Las Cruces H 41.13 1

Event 20 Boys 200 Meter Dash
1 Gilbert, Harlon Alamogordo H 22.76 4
2 Johnson, Derrik Las Cruces H 24.01 4
3 Reyna, Fabian Deming High 24.14 4
4 Abeyta, Isaiah Centennial H 25.01 1
5 Mediola, Napu Alamogordo H 25.24 4
6 Aguilar, Daniel Deming High 25.30 4
7 Parra, Jose Silver High 25.33 4
8 Villegas, Gabriel Deming High 25.79 3
9 Spencer, Klevon Alamogordo H 25.85 3
10 Chacon, Josiah Silver High 25.97 3
11 Diaz, Joe Silver High 26.41 3
12 Pierce, Mason Centennial H 26.47 1
13 Weir, Levi Las Cruces H 26.85 2
14 Rios, Joshua Silver High 28.31 2
15 Pollock, Chris Alamogordo H 29.79 1

Event 21 Girls 3200 Meter Run
1 Najar, Vanesa Alamogordo H 12:52.06
2 Santistevan, Kathleen Deming High 16:31.29

Event 22 Boys 3200 Meter Run
1 Rogers, Colton Silver High 10:44.12
2 Rios, Dax Centennial H 10:53.93
3 Winder, Ben Las Cruces H 10:55.89
4 Krizek, Matthew Las Cruces H 10:57.41
5 Avila, Angel Alamogordo H 11:58.69
6 Hallbeck, Jack Alamogordo H 12:16.45

7 Ball, Evan Centennial H 13:27.50

Event 23 Girls 4×400 Meter Relay
1 Alamogordo High School ‘A’ 4:11.38
1) Adams, Rebecca 2) Stinson, Yvonne
3) Neilson, Michaela 4) Martin, Justyse
2 Centennial High School ‘A’ 4:37.26
1) Gunn, Devyn 2) Barrio, Audrey
3) Harrison, Syella 4) Hoyle, Deianira
3 Las Cruces High School ‘A’ 4:51.06

Event 24 Boys 4×400 Meter Relay
1 Alamogordo High School ‘A’ 3:30.86
1) Barraza, Ezequiel 2) Gilbert, Harlon
3) Kepfer, Aiden 4) Kotter, Gabe
2 Centennial High School ‘A’ 3:49.27
1) Fort, Craig 2) Sedor, Paul
3) Abeyta, Isaiah 4) Ortiz, Christian

Event 25 Girls Long Jump
1 Stinson, Yvonne Alamogordo H 16-02.00
2 Barrera, Isabella Las Cruces H 15-11.00
3 Duchene, Kaelan Alamogordo H 15-04.25
4 McCain, Jordan Silver High 14-02.75
5 Walker, Gracie Alamogordo H 13-10.50
5 Duran, Hailey Tularosa Hig 13-10.50
7 Barrio, Audrey Centennial H 13-02.50
8 Skinner, Hannah Silver High 11-04.00
9 Goff, Sailer Tularosa Hig 10-11.50

Event 26 Boys Long Jump
1 Moser, Landon Alamogordo H 19-05.00
2 Abeyta, Isaiah Centennial H 19-01.25
3 Ortega, Israel Tularosa Hig 18-05.25
4 Reyes, Isaiah Tularosa Hig 17-10.50
5 Hernandez, Daniel Centennial H 17-07.50
6 Mediola, Napu Alamogordo H 17-04.25
7 Bernal, Ivan Alamogordo H 16-11.50
8 Baeza, Isaac Deming High 16-08.50
9 Barraza, Matthew Tularosa Hig 16-07.00
10 Parra, Jose Silver High 16-06.50
11 Ocoha, Jesus Alamogordo H 16-03.00
12 Chacon, Josiah Silver High 16-02.00
13 Vasquez, Ricky Silver High 16-00.00
14 Madrid, Diego Silver High 15-06.00
15 Hofacket, Charlie Deming High 14-11.25
16 Bitar, Oscar Centennial H 13-06.75

Event 27 Girls Triple Jump
1 Esquero, Alyssa Alamogordo H 33-10.00
2 Harrison, Syella Centennial H 30-10.50
3 Riordan, Anna Alamogordo H 29-09.00
4 Koehler, Lynley Alamogordo H 29-05.25
5 Neilson, Michaela Alamogordo H 28-09.50

Event 28 Boys Triple Jump
1 Gilbert, Harlon Alamogordo H 42-09.50
2 Garcia, Celso Alamogordo H 38-00.00
3 Herrera, Marcus Centennial H 34-04.25
4 Holt, Wyatt Alamogordo H 34-04.00
5 Lara, Nathan Centennial H 33-02.00
6 Umphress, Jonathan Centennial H 32-01.00
7 Hofacket, Charlie Deming High 31-07.00

Event 29 Girls High Jump
1 Stinson, Yvonne Alamogordo H 4-10.00
2 Castillo, Evelyn Alamogordo H 4-08.00
3 Navarette, Janessa Centennial H 4-04.00
3 Soe, Saung Alamogordo H 4-04.00
3 Amador, Catrianna Centennial H 4-04.00
3 Duran, Hailey Tularosa Hig 4-04.00

Event 30 Boys High Jump
1 Sell, Zack Alamogordo H 5-10.00
2 Kotter, Gabe Alamogordo H 5-08.00
3 Spencer, Klevon Alamogordo H J5-08.00
4 Ramirez, Cesar Deming High J5-08.00
5 Hofacket, Charlie Deming High 5-02.00

Event 31 Girls Pole Vault
1 Gerou, Eva Alamogordo H 8-09.00
2 Contreras, Nikki Las Cruces H 8-03.00
3 Bates, Trezure Alamogordo H 6-09.00
4 Moore, Victoria Centennial H 5-09.00

Event 32 Boys Pole Vault
1 Whitelock, Paul Centennial H 10-09.00
2 Hamilton, Chris Las Cruces H 10-03.00
3 Marquez, Joey Alamogordo H 9-09.00

Event 33 Girls Discus Throw
1 Marquez, Macy Alamogordo H 118-01
2 Ocampo, Lauren Centennial H 113-08
3 Leal, Ayanna Centennial H 93-04
4 Pili, Aveolela Centennial H 87-10
5 Salas, Alexys Silver High 82-11
6 Gaston, Layla Tularosa Hig 82-05
7 Vela, Prisila Las Cruces H 78-03
8 Baca, Victoria Deming High 73-04
9 Flourney, Liz Deming High 67-11
10 Salopek, Shaylie Las Cruces H 62-08
11 Pattinson, Maliah Alamogordo H 58-03
12 Kennedy, Kayelee Alamogordo H 54-04

Event 34 Boys Discus Throw
1 Gunn, Jayden Centennial H 141-11
2 LoCoco, Kaden Alamogordo H 137-10
3 Kennedy, Christian Alamogordo H 130-05
4 Ortiz, Ian Deming High 116-09
5 Coyazo, Daniel Alamogordo H 109-07
6 RamIrez, Marcos Deming High 101-00
7 Coyazo, Aiden Alamogordo H 93-01
8 Lewis, Dominic Centennial H 92-10
9 Ortiz, Brandon Silver High 91-00
10 Washam, Dalton Centennial H 83-09
11 Fresquez, Joshua Centennial H 78-10
12 Ellis, Alexander Silver High 73-04
13 Begay, Dace Silver High 66-11

Event 35 Girls Javelin Throw
1 Ocampo, Lauren Centennial H 121-08
2 Lessentine, Sierra Alamogordo H 109-01
3 Torres, Ariana Alamogordo H 102-04
4 Pili, Aveolela Centennial H 99-05
5 Martinez, Makayla Silver High 94-08
6 Sneed, Madison Las Cruces H 80-00
7 Lina, Jayden Las Cruces H 78-02
8 Gaston, Layla Tularosa Hig 74-02
9 Skinner, Hannah Silver High 66-08
10 Flourney, Liz Deming High 62-06
11 Baca, Victoria Deming High 58-07

Event 36 Boys Javelin Throw
1 Bowen, Jimmy Alamogordo H 142-06
2 Ortiz, Ian Deming High 120-00
3 Anthony, Connor Alamogordo H 98-07
4 Cruz, Joaquin Alamogordo H 96-10
5 Fresquez, Joshua Centennial H 94-00
6 RamIrez, Marcos Deming High 92-03
7 Washam, Dalton Centennial H 86-05

Event 37 Girls Shot Put
1 Pili, Aveolela Centennial H 35-03.00
2 Marquez, Macy Alamogordo H 30-10.00
3 Salas, Alexys Silver High 29-07.00
4 Vela, Prisila Las Cruces H 28-05.00
5 Baca, Victoria Deming High 27-01.00
6 Flourney, Liz Deming High 25-11.00
7 Parraz, Teresa Las Cruces H 23-06.00
8 Pattinson, Maliah Alamogordo H 19-01.00

Event 38 Boys Shot Put
1 LoCoco, Kaden Alamogordo H 45-02.00
2 Gunn, Jayden Centennial H 44-02.00
3 Cruz, Joaquin Alamogordo H 40-08.00
4 Kennedy, Christian Alamogordo H 39-01.00
5 Ortiz, Ian Deming High 38-06.00
6 Coyazo, Daniel Alamogordo H 37-00.00
7 Lewis, Dominic Centennial H 36-06.00
8 Ellis, Alexander Silver High 35-03.00
9 Ortiz, Brandon Silver High 33-00.00
10 Washam, Dalton Centennial H 32-11.00
11 Fresquez, Joshua Centennial H 32-07.00
12 Ramirez, Marcos Deming High 29-07.00
13 Begay, Dace Silver High 29-04.00
14 Bennett, Anthony Deming High 27-00.00


Congratulations to all the student athletes from all 6 schools that participated in this odd post Covid-19 Season. Next week the Alamogordo boys will compete at the Gadsden Meet on Friday, Tularosa will compete at District 3-2A Meet at Cloudcroft next Friday.

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New Mexico History & Politics- 1910 to 2020: On the back Soledad C. Chacón climbs the New Mexico Round House and the Congressional Delegation of Rep. Deb Haaland, Yvette Herrell and Teresa Leger Fernandez

On the back Soledad C. Chacón climbs the New Mexico Round House and the Congressional Delegation of Rep. Deb Haaland, Yvette Herrell and Teresa Leger Fernandez

Was 2014 the flashpoint for women in executive leadership and politics for the state of New Mexico? A lot of dialog has been created about the number women in politics in New Mexico of recent but not much has been published about the pathway that led to the success of women in power. There are a few key leaders, key organizations and the path fell on the backbone or foundation of some strong and determined women to get New Mexico to where it is now. Not only is it a leader in the number of women in political power it is also the national leader of women of color in political power. Let us look at a little insight into the history of what created the pathway to female equity in New Mexico political leadership.

The history of women impacting New Mexico politics begins in excess of 100 years ago…

New Mexico during its founding had been among the more politically conservative states in the West when it came to women’s suffrage, refusing to extend women the right to vote until after the passage of the 19th Amendment. The fight for women’s suffrage in New Mexico was incremental and had the support of both Hispanic and Anglo women suffragists. When New Mexico was a territory, women only had the right to vote in school board elections. Women under the Republic of Mexico in the land that became New Mexico had more rights than women in the United States did at the time. During the time that New Mexico was a territory of the United States, women were allowed to vote in school board elections.

The New Mexico State Constitutional Convention of 1910…

In 1910, New Mexico was eligible to become a state and a state constitutional convention was held. Just before the convening of the convention, the New Mexico Women’s Christian Temperance Union (WCTU) held a public debate on women’s suffrage. This debate took place in August in Mountainair, New Mexico and featured the president of the University of New Mexico and a socialist.

Most delegates to the convention did not women participating in politics. Nevertheless, during the convention which began on October 3, librarian, Julia Duncan Brown Asplund, attended each day and petitioned delegates to provide partial suffrage for women in the right to vote in school elections Delegate Solomon Luna, uncle of prominent New Mexican suffragist, Nina Otero-Warren, and H.O Bursum were both pro-suffrage.

Delegate Reuben Heflin, a Democrat from Farmington introduced the school election provision early on during the convention. On November 8, the convention’s Committee on Elective Franchise sponsored a “motion to strike out the limited franchise for women.” Two of the delegates were very opposed to women voting even in school elections were Delegates Dougherty and Sena. Dougherty stated that he didn’t believe women in New Mexico wanted to vote and Sena claimed that voting would lead to harm for women.

After this, the Woman’s Club of Albuquerque presented a petition for partial suffrage to the convention through Delegate Stover. The provision to allow women to vote did pass and was adopted in the final draft of the constitution which was passed on November 21. However, the constitution was also written in such a way that adding other voting rights would be difficult. The constitution required that three-fourths of all voters in each county in New Mexico would have to approve any changes to suffrage in the state.

When New Mexico created its state constitution in 1910, it continued to allow women to vote only in school elections. Upon creation of the state constitution, it was deemed impossible to modify the constitution to extend the voting rights of women any further.

Women in the suffrage fight in the state of New Mexico chose to pursue advocating for a federal women’s suffrage amendment. They organized among both English and Spanish speaking groups from the Alfred M. Bergere House which is on the National Register of Historic Places. That house was the flashpoint and the origin of the suffrage movement in New Mexico. The home originally built in the early 1870s on the Fort Marcy Military Reservation became the home of the Otero Bergere family, including Adelina (Nina) Otero Warren, a noted suffragist, author, and businesswoman. Her suffrage work in New Mexico caught the attention of suffrage leader Alice Paul, who tapped Nina in 1917 to head the New Mexico chapter of the Congressional Union (precursor to the National Woman’s Party). Nina insisted that suffrage literature be published in both English and Spanish, in order to reach the widest audience. Under their leadership in galvanizing women of color to unite with Caucasian women pressure then was put on the many male New Mexico politicians who then were forced to support suffrage on a federal level. Continued advocacy on behalf of suffragists in the state allowed New Mexico to become the 32nd state to ratify the Nineteenth Amendment on February 21, 1920.

The Nations First Female Statewide Office Holder A New Mexican and a Woman of Color…

In 1922, two years after the 19th Amendment guaranteed women the right to vote, the people of New Mexico elected Soledad Chávez de Chacón (August 10, 1890–August 4, 1936) as the first woman elected to be the Secretary of State of New Mexico, and the first Hispanic woman elected to statewide office in the United States.

She served as acting Governor of New Mexico for two weeks in 1924, becoming the second woman to act as chief executive of a U.S. state.

The Growth Curve and Roadblock to Women In Politics…

The trend of women in political power continued to grow in New Mexico. The trends favored a growth of women in political office nationwide. In New Mexico and nationally the proportion of women among statewide elective officials had grown substantially during the 1960s to 1971. From 1971 to 1983 the increases were small and incremental. Then, between 1983 and 2000, a period of significant growth, the number and proportion of women serving statewide almost tripled, reaching a record of 92 women, constituting 28.5 percent of all statewide elected officials, in 2000. Since 2000, the numbers and proportions dropped notably. As a result, dialog began on what to do to help train and groom women for leadership and into political office.

The decline in women statewide elected officials continued following the 2010 elections. Despite the election of three new women governors, the number of women serving in statewide elective offices nationwide actually decreased by two, and fewer women, 69 held statewide offices in 2011 than in 1995 when there were 84 women.

A review of the 2010 election results in 2011 showed some major issues of concern, women held 21.8 percent of the 317 statewide elective positions nationwide. In addition to the six women governors, 11 women (four Democrat, seven Republican) served as lieutenant governors in the 44 states that elect lieutenant governors in statewide elections. This was considerably fewer than the record number of 19 women who served as lieutenant governors in 1995.

Other women statewide elected officials included: 11 secretaries of state (eight Democrats, three Republicans), seven state auditors (five Democrats, two Republicans), six state treasurers (five Democrats, one Republican), seven attorneys general (five Democrats, two Republicans), five chief education officials (two Democrats, two Republicans, one nonpartisan), four public service commissioners (three Democrats, one Republican), four state comptroller/controllers (one Democrat, three Republicans), two commissioners of insurance (one Democrat, one Republican), three corporation commissioners (one Democrat, two Republicans), one commissioner of labor (Republican), one railroad commissioner (Republican), and one public regulatory commissioner (Democrat).

In addition to the two women of color who served as governors, the women serving in statewide elective office included four African-Americans (the lieutenant governor of Florida, the attorney general of California (Kamala Harris), the state treasurer of Connecticut and the corporation commissioner of Arizona); three Latinas (the secretary of state of New Mexico, the attorney general of Nevada and the superintendent of public instruction for Oregon); and one Native American (the public regulatory commissioner of New Mexico).

The decreases of women in politics became and alarming trend not only in the US but south of the border in the country of Mexico as well. However, they took an interesting approach and made it the law of the land to engage more women into leadership…

The country of Mexico approved a political reform package that, among other things, included new measures aimed to ensure the greater participation of women in politics in 2014. The law now requires gender parity, which means that at least fifty percent of the candidates fielded by a political party in either federal or state legislative elections must be female.

Mexico had a history of encouraging the participation of women in politics and has impressive rates of participation in the federal Congress. Women in 2014 accounted for 38% of the legislators in Mexico’s lower house and 35% of the senators, rates in line with the Nordic countries (in 2014 the US, 18% of the seats in the House of Representatives and 20% of the Senate seats are filled by women). Mexico’s high rate of female participation is due in large part to previous affirmative action policies, which included several loopholes that the new law closes. Formerly, in order to comply with established quotas, women who were put on the ballot were later encouraged to cede their place to a male listed as a reserve replacement (oftentimes their husband) –the political party’s preference in the first place. Furthermore, women were included on the list to be assigned by their party under proportional representation but were so far down in the pecking order that they were rarely tapped to serve.

The new reform increased the quota requirement for candidates to 50%, with more stringent rules related to how the quota is implemented. Now, for example, the candidate and her replacement will have to be female.

Demographics favor women and most especially women of color in New Mexico…

The state of New Mexico took notice of what was happening in the country south of her border and of the trends within the United State. It was determined demographics actually work in the favor of women in key states such as New Mexico. As such women especially the Democratic leadership reviewed options in keys states such as New Mexico.

New Mexico’s population is a majority Latino or Hispanic and an additional 11 percent American Indian or Alaska Native, making it one of the few states, in which most of its residents, are non-white. The Latino population has grown over the past few decades, meaning a Chicanx or Latina candidates share a similar ethnic background now with a majority of the population.

The percentage of racial and ethnic minorities — people who identify as Hispanic, black, Asian, or “other” — in New Mexico eclipsed the percentage of white residents’ way back in 1994. California, New Mexico, and Texas were not far behind.

And by the year 2060, a total of 22 states are projected to have what demographers call, somewhat oxymoronically, “majority-minority” populations.

Four states — Arizona, Florida, Georgia, and New Jersey — are set to tip in the 2020s. In the 2030s, Alaska, Louisiana, and New York will follow. Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, Mississippi, Oklahoma, and Virginia will obtain race-ethnic majority-minority status in 2040s. And Colorado, North Carolina, and Washington are on track to make it in the 2050s.

New Mexico as one of the first majority-minority states is the trendsetter into the future of politics…

New Mexico politics has also become increasingly dominated by Democrats, which may have helped some women of color, as women of color are disproportionately likely to run — and win — on the Democratic side of the ticket. But recruiting women of color has also become a higher priority for groups that aim to propel more women into elected office, like Emerge, a national Democratic organization that opened an office in New Mexico in 2005. Emerge New Mexico, claims that over the past 14 years, 350 women have gone through their six-month training program. Of those, over half have run for office and over half of the program members are also women of color. 98 Emerge New Mexico Alumnae are actively in Public Office per their 2020 data on their website to include…

U.S. Cabinet Secretary

Deb HaalandU.S. Secretary of the Interior, ENM ’07;

New Mexico Statewide Office

Commissioner Stephanie Garcia Richard Commissioner of Public Lands, ENM ’08; Chair Marg Elliston Chair of the Democratic Party of New Mexico, ENM ’13

New Mexico Supreme Court

Justice Barbara VigilNew Mexico Supreme Court Justice, ENM ’12Justice Julie VargasNew Mexico Supreme Court Justice, Statewide, ENM ’14Justice Shannon Bacon New Mexico Supreme Court Justice, ENM Founding Board Member

New Mexico Court of Appeals

Judge Jennifer Attrep New Mexico Court of Appeals, Statewide, ENM ’15: Judge Kristina Bogardus New Mexico Court of Appeals, Statewide, ENM ’17Judge Megan Duffy Mexico Court of Appeals, Statewide, ENM ’18; Judge Shammara Henderson New Mexico Court of Appeals, Statewide, ENM ’10Judge Jacqueline Medina New Mexico Court of Appeals, Statewide, ENM ’14Judge Jane Yohalem New Mexico Court of Appeals, Statewide, ENM ’18

State Senate

Senator Shannon Pinto Senate District 3, Tohatchi, ENM ’20;
Senator Katy Duhigg Senate District 10, Albuquerque, ENM ’11; Senator Siah Correa Hemphill Senate District 28, Albuquerque, ENM ’19Senator Carrie Hamblen Senate District 38, Albuquerque, ENM ’15

State House

Rep. D. Wonda Johnson House District 5, Gallup, ENM ’14; Rep. Patricia Roybal Caballero House District 13, Albuquerque, ENM ’07; Rep. Dayan “Day” Hochman-Vigil House District 15, Albuquerque, ENM ’18; Rep. Debbie Armstrong House District 17, Albuquerque, ENM ’12; Rep. Meredith Dixon House District 20, Albuquerque, ENM ’20; Rep. Debbie Sariñana House District 21, Albuquerque, ENM ’16; Rep. Liz Thomson House District 24, Albuquerque, ENM ’09; Rep. Georgene Louis House District 26, Albuquerque, ENM ’10; Rep. Marian Matthews House District 27, Albuquerque, ENM Bootcamp ’19; Rep. Melanie Stansbury House District 28, Albuquerque, ENM ’17; Rep. Joy Garratt House District 29, Albuquerque, ENM ’16; Rep. Natalie Figueroa, House District 30, Albuquerque, ENM ’16; Rep. Angelica Rubio House District 35, Las Cruces, ENM ’13; Rep. Joanne Ferrary House District 37, Las Cruces, ENM ’13; Rep. Kristina Ortez House District 42, Las Cruces, ENM ’20; Rep. Christine Chandler House District 43, Los Alamos, ENM Bootcamp ’18; Rep. Linda Serrato House District 45, Las Cruces, ENM ’18; Rep. Andrea Romero House District 46, Santa Fe, ENM ’18; Rep. Tara Lujan House District 48, Santa Fe, ENM ’12; Rep. Karen Bash House District 68, Albuquerque, ENM ’18

Judges

Judge Maria Sanchez-Gagne 1st Judicial District, Div II, ENM ’16; Judge Shannon Broderick Bulman 1st Judicial District, Div III, ENM ’19; Judge Sylvia Lamar 1st Judicial District, Div IV, ENM ’15; Judge Kathleen McGarry Ellenwood 1st Judicial District, Div X, ENM ’20; Judge Catherine Begaye 2nd Judicial District, Children’s Court, ENM ’14; Judge Beatrice Brickhouse 2nd Judicial District, Div IV, ENM ’10 Judge Nancy Franchini 2nd Judicial District, Div V, ENM ’14; Judge Lisa Chavez Ortega 2nd Judicial District, Div XIII, ENM Bootcamp ’19; Judge Marie Ward 2nd Judicial District, Div XIV, ENM ’06 Judge Erin O’Connell 2nd Judicial District, Div XVII, ENM ’19; Judge Amber Chavez Baker 2nd Judicial District, Div XXII, ENM Bootcamp ’19; Judge Debra Ramirez 2nd Judicial District, Div XXIV, ENM ’15; Judge Jane Levy 2nd Judicial District, Div XXV, ENM ’17; Judge Clara Moran 2nd Judicial District, Div XXVIII, ENM ’16; udge Melissa Kennelly 8th Judicial District, Div IX, ENM Bootcamp ’19; Judge Amanda Sanchez Villalobos 13th Judicial District, Div IX, ENM Bootcamp ’19; Judge Rosemary Cosgrove Aguilar Metropolitan Court, Bernalillo County, ENM ’08; Judge Brittany Maldonado Malott Metropolitan Court, Bernalillo County, ENM ’19; Judge Courtney Weaks Metropolitan Court, Bernalillo County, ENM ’13; Judge Elizabeth Allen Municipal Judge, District 32, ENM Bootcamp ’18; Judge Cristy Carbón-Gaul Probate Court Judge, Bernalillo County, ENM Founding Board Member

Municipal

Councilor Diane Gibson Albuquerque City Councilor, District 7, ENM ’11, Councilor Tessa Abeyta-Stuve Las Cruces City Councilor, District 2, ENM ’18; Councilor Johana Bencomo Las Cruces City Councilor, District 4, ENM ’18; Councilor Renee Villarreal Santa Fe County Councilor, ENM ’18; Councilor Guadalupe Cano Silver City Town Councilor, ENM ’11

County

Assessor Tanya Giddings Bernalillo County Assessor, ENM ’14; Assessor Linda Gallegos Sandoval County Assessor, ENM Bootcamp ’18; Clerk Linda Stover Bernalillo County Clerk, ENM Bootcamp ’19; Clerk Amanda López Askin Doña Ana County Clerk, ENM ’19; Clerk Katharine Clark Santa Fe County Clerk, ENM ’17; Clerk Naomi Maestas Los Alamos County Clerk, ENM ’20; Treasurer Nancy Bearce Bernalillo County Treasurer, ENM ’14; Treasurer Jennifer Manzanares Santa Fe County Treasurer, ENM ’19; Commissioner Charlene Pyskoty Bernalillo County Commission, District 5, ENM ’18; Commissioner Adriann Barboa Bernalillo County Commissioner, District 3, ENM ’17; Commissioner Diana Murillo-Trujillo Doña Ana County Commissioner, District 2, ENM ’15; Commissioner Alicia Edwards Grant County Commissioner, District 3, ENM ’15; Commissioner Sara Scott Alamos County Councilor, Position 1, ENM Bootcamp ’18; Commissioner Katherine Bruch Sandoval County Commissioner, ENM Bootcamp ’18; Commissioner Anna Hansen Santa Fe County Commissioner, District 2, ENM ’14; Commissioner Anna Hamilton Santa Fe County Commissioner, District 4, ENM ’16; Commissioner Anjanette Brush Taos County Commissioner, District 4, ENM ’19

New Mexico Public Regulation Commission

Commissioner Cynthia Hall PRC District 1, ENM ’15

New Mexico Public Education Commission

Commissioner Melissa Armijo PEC District 1, ENM ’19; Commissioner Glenna Voigt

PEC District 3, ENM ’18

New Mexico County/Municipal School Boards

Yolanda Cordova APS Board of Education, District 1, ENM ’18; Elizabeth Armijo APS Board of Education, District 6, ENM ’09; Nancy Baca CNM Governing Board, District 5, ENM ’10; Teresa Tenorio Las Cruces School Board, District 4, ENM ’18; Chris Bernstein Los Alamos School Board, District 3, ENM ’18; Mara Salcido Lovington School Board, District 3, ENM ’15; Hilda Sanchez Roswell School Board, District 4, ENM ’17; Jody Pugh Santa Fe Community College Board of Trustees, Position 3, ENM ’18; Carmen Gonzales Santa Fe Public Schools Board of Education, ENM ’18; Kate Noble Santa Fe Public Schools Board of Education, District 3, ENM ’17; M. Paulene Abeyta To’hajiilee School Board, ENM ’17

Democratic Party

Flora Lucero Bernalillo County Democratic Party, Chair, ENM ’19; Laura Childress Lincoln County Democratic Party, 1st Vice-Chair, ENM ’20; Leah Ahkee-Baczkiewcz Sandoval County Democratic Party, Vice-Chair, ENM ‘18

Middle Rio Grande Conservation District

Stephanie Russo Baca MRGCD Board Director, Position 5, ENM ‘19

Soil and Water Conservation District

Teresa Smith De Cherif Valencia Soil & Water Conservation District Board Supervisor, ENM ‘14

New Mexico Women by the Numbers after 2020…

Many women are now being elected as witnessed by this training of groups like Emerge and the training paid off in strong numbers in 2020. After the election of 2020, the real story in New Mexico is, it was the year of the woman and the year of the woman of color. Women made state history by winning most seats in the New Mexico State House of Representatives. Though still in the minority in the New Mexico Senate, women set a record in that chamber, too, with 12 seats. Out of 70 State Representatives, women now make up 37 of them on the house side, and of course the Governor is a woman.

New Mexico now ranks fourth in the nation for the ratio of women to men who will hold House chamber seats in January, said Jean Sinzdak, associate director of the Center for American Women and Politics at Rutgers University in New Jersey, per the Santa Fe New Mexican publication.

New Mexico continued to make its mark in political history by becoming the first state in history to elect an all-female delegation to the U.S. House of Representatives. It also made history as the first state in the continental US to elect all three members of this historic delegation as also women of color. Incumbent Rep. Deb Haaland, D-N.M., Yvette Herrell (Republican) and Teresa Leger Fernandez (Democrat) in New Mexico’s three congressional districts were the three women elected. (Note Deb Haaland has since been appointed to the US Secretary of the Interior as the first Native American to hold that title, her seat is now up for special election) The first U.S. state to have an all women of color House delegation was Hawaii in 1990, when Rep. Patsy Mink (D-Hawaii) and Rep. Pat Saiki (R-Hawaii) took office, however New Mexico is the first state to do so in the continental US.

Haaland is an enrolled citizen of the Pueblo of Laguna and made history in 2018 when she became one of the first Native American congresswomen. Herrell is a member of the Cherokee nation and former N.M. state representative. Leger-Fernandez is the first woman and Latina to ever represent northern New Mexico in U.S. Congress.

Our hope our future New Mexico…

Each of the proud and deserving women have a long difficult road ahead of them to represent a diverse population within New Mexico. Much has been said about the poor rankings of the state in academics, the reliance upon the oil industry to keep the state budget afloat and the many challenges with crime and poverty within the state. The men proceeding these women have not made it an easy job for them to step into. However, the editorial staff of the publication has the hope that each of these 3 elected women and the 98 others in the variety of offices showcased above will step up to the challenges ahead. Our hope is they will reach across the isle and put partisan ideology aside and work together as women with compassion and strength to craft policy that carries New Mexico forward into jobs creation for the 21st Century.

Each woman highlighted in this article is a woman of convictions and of talent to gain the position they have ascended to. Our hope is they will read this, remember the battles of suffrage fought by Julia Duncan Brown Asplund, Alice Paul, Nina Otero-Warren and others from 1910 that gained them the right to hold the office they are in today and the right to vote. Our hope is they will honor the memory of Soledad Chávez de Chacón by leading, not pandering to special interest and money like the men have for so many decades but by honestly leading and listening to the diversity of constituents to put them there.

Are you up to the challenge?

Rep. Deb Haaland and her ultimate successor, D-N.M., Yvette Herrell (Republican) and Teresa Leger Fernandez (Democrat) the baton was handed to you. Now are you listening? Will you reach across the diversity that is New Mexico and represent all of the diverse opinion’s ideas and constituencies? Will you step up and above the fray and show that women can lead differently and with more compassion than men? History will be judging you and we hope it will be a kind judgement in the years ahead!

Author Chris Edwards

Follow Executive Coach and Author, Chris Edwards via the Alamogordo Town News, 2nd Life Media or his Podcast, 2nd
Life Media Present. Published books by Author Chris Edwards include Coach Bob Sepulveda: The Early Days, 2 Hours Unplugged Unplug and Reconnect, 90 Days to a Glass Half Full Lifestyle, and has published essays on criminal justice reform Removing Barriers to State Occupational Licenses to Enhance Entrepreneurial Job Growth: Out of Prison, Out of Work.

Research for the story above sourced from:

Soledad Chávez Chacón: A New Mexico Political Pioneer. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Printing Services. Retrieved August 27, 2020, “Woman Wielding Power: Pioneer Female State, Legislators”. nwhm.org. National Woman’s History Museum. Retrieved 23 March 2015., “National Register of Historic Places Inventory/Nomination: Salvador Armijo House”. National Park Service. October 8, 1976., knowledgecenter.csg.org, Vox Media- Here’s when you can expect racial minorities to be the majority in each state, Five Thirty-Eight Why New Mexico Elects More Women of Color Than the Rest Of The Country, EMERGE, Ballotpedia, Wikipedia, NCLS.org, nmlegis.gov, AP News, MSN.com, US.gov

Who was the fastest man on earth, was responsible for the Murphy’s Law “whatever can go wrong will go wrong, and championed the seatbelt you wear daily?

A resident of Alamogordo, who worked at Alamogordo New Mexico’s Holloman Air Force Base, made history in the U.S. space program and history for travel at a speed faster than a .45-caliber bullet in an experiment to test the limits of human endurance.

That same Alamogordo resident was known as the “fastest man on Earth” during the research phase of the US space program to the moon. He accelerated in five seconds from a standstill to 632 m.p.h. The New York Herald Tribune called this Alamogordo resident “a gentleman who can stop on a dime and give you 10 cents change.”

He won what will perhaps be even more lasting fame in a test five years earlier, when he suffered injuries owing to a mistake by a US Airforce Captain Murphy. The result was the phrase “Murphy’s Law, Whatever Can Go Wrong, Will Go Wrong .”

Who was this remarkable Alamogordo resident? Seven years before the US sent the other famous Alamogordo resident Ham, (the three-year-old chimpanzee) into space aboard the Mercury Capsule Number 5, this Alamogordo resident, was himself a live monkey, in many speed and endurance tests that tested the limits of man verses speed and gravity.

This individual of remarkable endurance was John Paul Stapp. Dr. Stapp was a flight surgeon in the U.S. Army Air Forces at the end of World War II, continued in the field of aviation medicine after the war, and transferred to the U.S. Air Force when it was established in 1947, to continue his work on the human response to flight.

His interests from the beginning were in the limits of the human body, when subjected to the increasing forces provided by faster and faster aircraft. In the early 1950s, no one knew what humans could withstand when it came for g-forces, rapid spins, oxygen deprivation, and exposure to cosmic rays.  Stapp began a program of human testing to determine those limits, becoming chief of the Aeromedical Field Laboratory at Holloman Air Force Base, New Mexico and living in Alamogordo.

Dr. Stapp made history aboard the Sonic Wind I rocket sled on December 10, 1954, when he set a land speed record of 632 mph in five seconds, subjecting him to 20 Gs of force during acceleration.

Although he had many individuals, available from a group of volunteers for this dangerous test ride, Dr. Stobb chose himself for the mission. He claimed he did not want to place another person into such a potentially hazardous position.

When the sled stopped in just 1.4 seconds, Dr. Stapp was hit with a force equivalent to 46.2 Gs, more than anyone had yet endured voluntarily on the planet to that point. He set a speed record and was a man of much scientific study. Upon ending the ride, he managed half a smile, as he was pulled from the sled. Dr. Stapp was in significant pain, and his eyes flooded with blood from the bursting of almost all of capillaries in his eyes. As Dr.  Stapp was rushed to the hospital, his aids, doctors, scientist and he all worried that one or both of his retinas had detached, leaving him blind. Thanks to a studious medical team ready with treatment on the standby, by the next day, he had regained enough of his normal vision to be released by his doctors. His eyesight would never fully recover back to the status prior to the tests but he felt the test was well worth the risk and was happy that he did it verses sending one of the volunteers due to the risk. A less strong man might not have survived the test intact.

Acclaimed by the world press as “The Fastest Man on Earth,” Dr. Stapp became an international sensation, appearing on magazine covers, television, and as the subject of an episode of “This is Your Life!” He appeared on the cover of Time Magazine…

Dr. Stapp was a modest man, in person and was approachable. He lived in Alamogordo after leaving the Air Forece and till the end of his life. He used his public acclaim not for personal gain but to pursue his dream of improving automobile safety. As a proponent for public safety, he felt that the safety measures he and his teams were developing for military aircraft should also be used for civilian automobiles.

Dr. Stapp understood the power of celebrity. As such he used his celebrity status to push for the installation of seat belts in American cars. He understood how to politic, navigate the government bureaucracy and use his public persona to push the Department of Transportation to review and eventually implement many now standard safety features. The success of his campaign efforts for public safety is measured in thousands of lives saved and injuries lessened every year by the safety precautions he championed during his lifetime not only in the US but around the world as his measures were adopted as standard world-wide.

In those early years of the mid 1950’s Dr. Stapp had hoped to make more runs on the Sonic Wind, with a goal of surpassing 1000 mph, however in June 1956, the sled flew off its track during an unmanned run and was severely damaged beyond appropriate repair.

Dr. Stapp would later ride an air-powered sled known as the “Daisy Track” at Holloman, but never again would he be subjected to the rigors of rocket-powered travel.

Dr. Stapp as an Airforce Colonel next planned and directed the Man-High Project, three manned high-altitude balloon flights to test human endurance at the edge of space. Conducted in June and August 1957, the project’s highlight was the second mission, during which Lieutenant David G. Simons reached an altitude of almost 102,000 feet. Project Man-High was a tremendous scientific success and helped prepare for America’s initial manned space which of course did not happen until after Alamogordo’s other famous resident “Ham” the three-year-old chimpanzee had successfully been launched and returned safely.

Dr. Stapp retired from the Air Force as a colonel in 1970. He went on to become a professor at the University of California’s Safety and Systems Management Center, then a consultant to the Surgeon General and NASA.

He next served as the president of the New Mexico Research Institute in Alamogordo, New Mexico, as well as chairman of the annual “Dr. Stapp International Car Crash Conference.”

 In 1991, Stapp received the National Medal of Technology, “for his research on the effects of mechanical force on living tissues leading to safety developments in crash protection technology.” He was also honorary chairman of the Stapp Foundation, underwritten by General Motors to provide scholarships for automotive engineering students.

Dr. Stapp was a well-regarded Alamogordo resident and spoke often at the public high school, in lectures at NMSU Alamogordo and as a guest lecturer at the Space Hall of Fame in Alamogordo.  He was always open to talking with young impressionable individuals encouraging the study of science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

Colonel Dr. John Stapp died in Alamogordo on November 13, 1999, at the age of eighty-nine. His many honors and awards included enrollment in the National Aviation Hall of Fame, the Air Force Cheney Award for Valor and the Lovelace Award from NASA for aerospace medical research.

Alamogordo, New Mexico has been called the cradle of America’s space program and offers a museum that applauds our exploration of the heavens with a mix of high-tech entertainment and dramatic exhibits. The United Space Hall of Fame and Space Museum in Alamogordo, New Mexico continues to honor Dr. John P. Stapp naming the Air & Space Park after him. Named after International Space Hall of Fame Inductee and aeromedical pioneer Dr. John P. Stapp, the Air and Space Park consists of large space-related artifacts documenting mankind’s exploration of space. Examples of exhibits include the Sonic Wind I rocket sled ridden by Dr. Stapp and the Little Joe II rocket which tested the Apollo Launch Escape System. At 86 feet tall, Little Joe II is the largest rocket ever launched from New Mexico. Many major breakthroughs in technology occurred in the Alamogordo area, and the museum offers a variety of exhibitions to showcase those milestones. Other features showcased are a tribute to the Delta Clipper Experimental; and the Clyde W. Tombaugh Theater and Planetarium, featuring a giant dome-screen and state-of-the-art surround sound to fully immerse the audience. If in the Alamogordo area or in Southern New Mexico this is a do not miss stop for anyone with an interest in space or the history of space exploration.

New Mexico Museum of Space History

LOCATION: Next to the New Mexico State University, Alamogordo at the Top of NM 2001, Alamogordo, NM

PHONE:(575) 437-2840

HOURS: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday, closed on Monday and Tuesday

ADMISSION: Adults are $8, Senior/Military/NM Resident $7, Children (4-12) $6, Tots (3 & Under) Free. New Mexico foster families are admitted free. Additional fees for theater and planetarium.

On the Web: www.NMSpaceMuseum.org

Article Author Chris Edwards, Alamogordo Town News, 2nd Life Media.

Excerpts and Source of Information: New Mexico Museum of Space History, The History Channel, Time Magazine September 12, 1955, The Discovery Channel, “Space Men: They were the first to brave the unknown (Transcript)”. American Experience. PBS. March 1, 2016. Retrieved January 2, 2019. “Building 29: Aero Medical Laboratory”. Historic Buildings & Sites at Wright-Patterson AFB. United States Air Force. August 12, 2002. Archived from the original on June 22, 2008. Retrieved November 15, 2008. Spark, Nick T. “The Story of John Paul Stapp”. The Ejection Site. Stapp JP (August 1948). “Problems of human engineering in regard to sudden declarative forces on man”. Mil Surg. 103 (2): 99–102. PMID 18876408.  Aviation Week for 3 January 1955 says he accelerated to 632 mph in five seconds and 2800 feet, then coasted for half a second, then slowed to a stop in 1.4 seconds. It says the track was 3500 feet long. Spark, Nick T. (2006). “

A resident of Alamogordo, who worked at Alamogordo New Mexico’s Holloman Air Force Base, made history in the U.S. space program and history for travel at a speed faster than a .45-caliber bullet in an experiment to test the limits of human endurance.

That same Alamogordo resident was known as the “fastest man on Earth” during the research phase of the US space program to the moon. He accelerated in five seconds from a standstill to 632 m.p.h. The New York Herald Tribune called this Alamogordo resident “a gentleman who can stop on a dime and give you 10 cents change.”

He won what will perhaps be even more lasting fame in a test five years earlier, when he suffered injuries owing to a mistake by a US Airforce Captain Murphy. The result was the phrase “Murphy’s Law.”

Who was this remarkable Alamogordo resident? Seven years before the US sent the other famous Alamogordo resident Ham, (the three-year-old chimpanzee) into space aboard the Mercury Capsule Number 5, this Alamogordo resident, was himself a live monkey, in many speed and endurance tests that tested the limits of man verses speed and gravity.

Text

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This individual of remarkable endurance was John Paul Stapp. Dr. Stapp was a flight surgeon in the U.S. Army Air Forces at the end of World War II, continued in the field of aviation medicine after the war, and transferred to the U.S. Air Force when it was established in 1947, to continue his work on the human response to flight.

A picture containing outdoor, transport, aircraft, old

Description automatically generated

His interests from the beginning were in the limits of the human body, when subjected to the increasing forces provided by faster and faster aircraft. In the early 1950s, no one knew what humans could withstand when it came for g-forces, rapid spins, oxygen deprivation, and exposure to cosmic rays.  Stapp began a program of human testing to determine those limits, becoming chief of the Aeromedical Field Laboratory at Holloman Air Force Base, New Mexico and living in Alamogordo.

Dr. Stapp made history aboard the Sonic Wind I rocket sled on December 10, 1954, when he set a land speed record of 632 mph in five seconds, subjecting him to 20 Gs of force during acceleration.

Although he had many individuals, available from a group of volunteers for this dangerous test ride, Dr. Stobb chose himself for the mission. He claimed he did not want to place another person into such a potentially hazardous position.

When the sled stopped in just 1.4 seconds, Dr. Stapp was hit with a force equivalent to 46.2 Gs, more than anyone had yet endured voluntarily on the planet to that point. He set a speed record and was a man of much scientific study. Upon ending the ride, he managed half a smile, as he was pulled from the sled. Dr. Stapp was in significant pain, and his eyes flooded with blood from the bursting of almost all of capillaries in his eyes. As Dr.  Stapp was rushed to the hospital, his aids, doctors, scientist and he all worried that one or both of his retinas had detached, leaving him blind. Thanks to a studious medical team ready with treatment on the standby, by the next day, he had regained enough of his normal vision to be released by his doctors. His eyesight would never fully recover back to the status prior to the tests but he felt the test was well worth the risk and was happy that he did it verses sending one of the volunteers due to the risk. A less strong man might not have survived the test intact.

Acclaimed by the world press as “The Fastest Man on Earth,” Dr. Stapp became an international sensation, appearing on magazine covers, television, and as the subject of an episode of “This is Your Life!” He appeared on the cover of Time Magazine…

A magazine with a person's face on it

Description automatically generated with medium confidence

Dr. Stapp was a modest man, in person and was approachable. He lived in Alamogordo after leaving the Air Forece and till the end of his life. He used his public acclaim not for personal gain but to pursue his dream of improving automobile safety. As a proponent for public safety, he felt that the safety measures he and his teams were developing for military aircraft should also be used for civilian automobiles.

Dr. Stapp understood the power of celebrity. As such he used his celebrity status to push for the installation of seat belts in American cars. He understood how to politic, navigate the government bureaucracy and use his public persona to push the Department of Transportation to review and eventually implement many now standard safety features. The success of his campaign efforts for public safety is measured in thousands of lives saved and injuries lessened every year by the safety precautions he championed during his lifetime not only in the US but around the world as his measures were adopted as standard world-wide.

In those early years of the mid 1950’s Dr. Stapp had hoped to make more runs on the Sonic Wind, with a goal of surpassing 1000 mph, however in June 1956, the sled flew off its track during an unmanned run and was severely damaged beyond appropriate repair.

Dr. Stapp would later ride an air-powered sled known as the “Daisy Track” at Holloman, but never again would he be subjected to the rigors of rocket-powered travel.

Dr. Stapp as an Airforce Colonel next planned and directed the Man-High Project, three manned high-altitude balloon flights to test human endurance at the edge of space. Conducted in June and August 1957, the project’s highlight was the second mission, during which Lieutenant David G. Simons reached an altitude of almost 102,000 feet. Project Man-High was a tremendous scientific success and helped prepare for America’s initial manned space which of course did not happen until after Alamogordo’s other famous resident “Ham” the three-year-old chimpanzee had successfully been launched and returned safely.

Dr. Stapp retired from the Air Force as a colonel in 1970. He went on to become a professor at the University of California’s Safety and Systems Management Center, then a consultant to the Surgeon General and NASA.

He next served as the president of the New Mexico Research Institute in Alamogordo, New Mexico, as well as chairman of the annual “Dr. Stapp International Car Crash Conference.”

 In 1991, Stapp received the National Medal of Technology, “for his research on the effects of mechanical force on living tissues leading to safety developments in crash protection technology.” He was also honorary chairman of the Stapp Foundation, underwritten by General Motors to provide scholarships for automotive engineering students.

Dr. Stapp was a well-regarded Alamogordo resident and spoke often at the public high school, in lectures at NMSU Alamogordo and as a guest lecturer at the Space Hall of Fame in Alamogordo.  He was always open to talking with young impressionable individuals encouraging the study of science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

Colonel Dr. John Stapp died in Alamogordo on November 13, 1999, at the age of eighty-nine. His many honors and awards included enrollment in the National Aviation Hall of Fame, the Air Force Cheney Award for Valor and the Lovelace Award from NASA for aerospace medical research.

Alamogordo, New Mexico has been called the cradle of America’s space program and offers a museum that applauds our exploration of the heavens with a mix of high-tech entertainment and dramatic exhibits. The United Space Hall of Fame and Space Museum in Alamogordo, New Mexico continues to honor Dr. John P. Stapp naming the Air & Space Park after him. Named after International Space Hall of Fame Inductee and aeromedical pioneer Dr. John P. Stapp, the Air and Space Park consists of large space-related artifacts documenting mankind’s exploration of space. Examples of exhibits include the Sonic Wind I rocket sled ridden by Dr. Stapp and the Little Joe II rocket which tested the Apollo Launch Escape System. At 86 feet tall, Little Joe II is the largest rocket ever launched from New Mexico. Many major breakthroughs in technology occurred in the Alamogordo area, and the museum offers a variety of exhibitions to showcase those milestones. Other features showcased are a tribute to the Delta Clipper Experimental; and the Clyde W. Tombaugh Theater and Planetarium, featuring a giant dome-screen and state-of-the-art surround sound to fully immerse the audience. If in the Alamogordo area or in Southern New Mexico this is a do not miss stop for anyone with an interest in space or the history of space exploration.

New Mexico Museum of Space History

LOCATION: Next to the New Mexico State University, Alamogordo at the Top of NM 2001, Alamogordo, NM

PHONE:(575) 437-2840

HOURS: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday, closed on Monday and Tuesday

ADMISSION: Adults are $8, Senior/Military/NM Resident $7, Children (4-12) $6, Tots (3 & Under) Free. New Mexico foster families are admitted free. Additional fees for theater and planetarium.

On the Web: www.NMSpaceMuseum.org

Article Author Chris Edwards, Alamogordo Town News, 2nd Life Media.

Excerpts and Source of Information: New Mexico Museum of Space History, The History Channel, Time Magazine September 12, 1955, The Discovery Channel, “Space Men: They were the first to brave the unknown (Transcript)”. American Experience. PBS. March 1, 2016. Retrieved January 2, 2019. “Building 29: Aero Medical Laboratory”. Historic Buildings & Sites at Wright-Patterson AFB. United States Air Force. August 12, 2002. Archived from the original on June 22, 2008. Retrieved November 15, 2008. Spark, Nick T. “The Story of John Paul Stapp”. The Ejection Site. Stapp JP (August 1948). “Problems of human engineering in regard to sudden declarative forces on man”. Mil Surg. 103 (2): 99–102. PMID 18876408.  Aviation Week for 3 January 1955 says he accelerated to 632 mph in five seconds and 2800 feet, then coasted for half a second, then slowed to a stop in 1.4 seconds. It says the track was 3500 feet long. Spark, Nick T. (2006). “Whatever Can Go Wrong, Will Go Wrong”: A History of Murphy’s Law. Periscope Film. ISBN 9780978638894. OCLC 80015522″: A History of Murphy’s Law. Periscope Film. ISBN 9780978638894. OCLC 80015522

Alamogordo Girls Win! Boys place 2nd at Cleveland Invitational Track and Field Meet COMPLETE RESULTS

Alamogordo Girls WIN MEET! Tiger Boys finish 2nd at Cleveland Invitational in Rio Rancho

Complete Results by competition…

Name  School Seed Finals Points 

1 Ellary Alamogordo H 12:17.07 12:31.20 7

2 Najar, Vanesa Alamogordo H 12:33.20 13:16.87 5 

Event 2 Boys 3200 Meter Run ======================================================================== Name Year School Seed Finals Points  

1 Rael, Nathias Sue Clevelan 10:50.00 10:47.27 7 

2 Ross, Colin Sue Clevelan 10:57.62 11:18.67 5 

3 Miller, Tobias Sue Clevelan 11:00.00 11:31.63 4 

4 Dawes, Caiden Sue Clevelan 11:10.00 x11:45.03 

5 Sisneros, Santos Belen High S 11:27.87 12:48.31 3

6 Hallbeck, Jack Alamogordo H 12:21.19 12:57.63 2

7 Padilla, Matias Belen High S 12:41.50 13:11.49 

Girls 4×100 Meter Relay ========================================================================School Seed Finals Points  

1 Alamogordo High School ‘A’ 50.78 51.47 10 

2 Sue Cleveland High School ‘A’ 53.10 52.55 8 

3 Pojoaque Valley High School ‘A’ 1:03.95 53.16 6

4 Belen High School ‘A’ 56.31 56.22

Event 4 Boys 4×100 Meter Relay ======================================================================== School Seed Finals Points 

1 Sue Cleveland High School ‘A’ 43.05 43.63 10

2 Belen High School ‘A’ 46.32 45.60 8 

3 Alamogordo High School ‘A’ 45.23 45.70 6 

4 Pojoaque Valley High School ‘A’ 47.60 46.45 4

Event 5 Girls 100 Meter Hurdles ========================================================================Name Year School Seed Finals Points 

1 Duchene, Kaelan Alamogordo H 16.99 17.87 7 

2 Goodmacher, Abigail Sue Clevelan 16.29 18.27 5

3 Riordan, Anna Alamogordo H 17.84 19.20 4 

4 Soe, Saung Alamogordo H 19.66 20.77 3

5 Castillo, Sofia Belen High S 19.73 21.05 2

6 Fillmore, Marie Alamogordo H 22.70 x22.55 

7 Martinez, Monroe Pojoaque Val 24.04 27.30 1

Event 6 Boys 110 Meter Hurdles ========================================================================Name Year School Seed Finals H# Points 

1 Avila, Antonio Sue Clevelan 18.00 15.72 2 7

2 Kotter, Gabe Alamogordo H 17.29 17.69 2 5 

3 Shendo, Devonte Sue Clevelan 17.60 17.97 2 4 

4 Wallace, William Sue Clevelan 19.25 18.47 2 3 

5 Sell, Zack Alamogordo H 17.65 19.15 2 2

6 Griego, Elijah Sue Clevelan 19.52 x20.19 2 

7 Padilla, Alan Pojoaque Val 21.16 21.39 1 1 

8 Hidalgo, Marques Belen High S 23.74 24.35 1 

9 Benavidez, Julian Belen High S 25.31 1 

10 Ortiz, Aiden Pojoaque Val 28.56 1 

Event 7 Girls 100 Meter Dash ======================================================================== Name Year School Seed Finals H# Points

1 Martin, Justyse Alamogordo H 12.58 13.22 2 7 

2 Thomas, Sydney Alamogordo H 13.30 13.75 2 5 

3 Quintana, Alicia Pojoaque Val 12.59 13.97 2 4 

4 Mamuya, Nia Sue Clevelan 13.28 14.18 2 3 

5 Shaw, Haley Alamogordo H 13.79 14.36 2 2 

6 Jamerson, Arianna Sue Clevelan 14.00 14.37 1 1

7 Quintana, Sonya Pojoaque Val 13.20 14.61 2 

8 Dannenberg, Ashley Sue Clevelan 14.20 14.62 1 

9 Horn, Danialle Sue Clevelan 14.03 x14.75 1 

10 Gomez, Analyssa Pojoaque Val 15.56 15.55 1 

11 Maez, Martina Pojoaque Val 16.04 x15.97 1

12 Dalmas, Charlie Mae Alamogordo H 

13.97 x16.00 2 13 Chavez, Emma Belen High S 16.19 1 

Event 8 Boys 100 Meter Dash ========================================================================Name Year School Seed Finals H# Points

  1 Wysong, Evan Sue Clevelan 11.51 11.86 2 7 

2 West, Brandon Sue Clevelan 11.88 11.93 2 5 

3 Sanchez, Nathan Belen High S 11.60 12.15 2 4 

4 Tuttle, Evert Belen High S 11.83 12.29 2 3 

5 Meloy Chavez, Anthon Pojoaque Val 11.79 12.4

6 2 2 6 Matinez, Diego Pojoaque Val 12.71 12.49 1 1

7 Tibbs, Sam Belen High S 11.78 12.65 2 

8 Dodd, Ethan Sue Clevelan 11.89 12.70 1

9 Barraza, Ezequiel Alamogordo H 11.84 12.89 2

10 Wedlow, Amarius Alamogordo H 11.94 12.92 1 

11 Surpris, Christian Alamogordo H 12.14 13.09 1 

12 Vasquez, Jesse Belen High S x13.37 1 — Murphy, David Sue Clevelan 11.61 DQ 2 

Event 9 Girls 4×800 Meter Relay ========================================================================School Seed Finals Points 

1 Alamogordo High School ‘A’ 10:35.92 11:06.04 10

2 Sue Cleveland High School ‘A’ 11:59.20 8 

3 Belen High School ‘A’ 12:10.64 6 

Event 10 Boys 4×800 Meter Relay ========================================================================School Seed Finals Points 

1 Sue Cleveland High School ‘A’ 8:41.49 8:59.29 10

2 Alamogordo High School ‘A’ 9:12.00 9:31.42 8

3 Pojoaque Valley High School ‘A’ 10:30.02 10:28.07 6

4 Belen High School ‘A’ 11:14.69 4

Event 11 Girls 4×200 Meter Relay ======================================================================== School Seed Finals Points 

1 Alamogordo High School ‘A’ 1:49.28 1:47.13 10 

2 Sue Cleveland High School ‘A’ 1:54.32 1:54.72 8 3

Belen High School ‘A’ 1:59.87 2:00.93 6 4 Pojoaque Valley High School ‘A’ 2:13.38 2:17.53 4

Event 12 Boys 4×200 Meter Relay ======================================================================== School Seed Finals Points 

1 Sue Cleveland High School ‘A’ 1:31.88 1:33.82 10

2 Alamogordo High School ‘A’ 1:35.80 1:34.43 8 

3 Belen High School ‘A’ 1:37.04 1:36.00 6

4 Pojoaque Valley High School ‘A’ 1:42.16 1:43.50 4

Event 13 Girls 400 Meter Dash ======================================================================== Name Year School Seed Finals H# Points 

1 Quintana, Alicia Pojoaque Val 58.50 1:04.52 2 7 

2 Gerou, Eva Alamogordo H 1:05.47 1:05.70 2 5 

3 Shaw, Haley Alamogordo H 1:09.46 1:07.14 2 4 

4 Walker, Gracie Alamogordo H 1:02.25 1:07.60 2 3 

5 Shaner, Tori Sue Clevelan 1:10.27 1:13.32 2 2

6 Mbonifor, Kaileen Sue Clevelan 1:15.72 1:15.43 1 1

7 Wright, Jada Belen High S 1:16.00 1

8 Bob, Jaelynn Belen High S 1:20.08 1

9 Lopez, Maesyn Belen High S 1:12.50 1:20.75 1 

10 Bernal, Vianey Pojoaque Val 1:29.55 1:26.83 1 

Event 14 Boys 400 Meter Dash ========================================================================Name Year School Seed Finals H# Points 

1 Monreal, Aurelio Alamogordo H 54.96 55.97 2 7 

2 Howell, Brandon Sue Clevelan 53.50 56.22 2 5

3 Bernal, Ivan Alamogordo H 55.92 57.94 2 4 

4 Fresquez, Nicholas Belen High S 1:00.26 59.87 1 3

5 Holt, Wyatt Alamogordo H 57.37 1:00.44 2 2 

6 Sell, Matthew Alamogordo H 56.06 x1:02.76 2 

7 Parra-Erivez, Aaron Belen High S 1:03.61 1:03.03 1 1 

8 Lopez, Axel Belen High S 1:05.38 1:03.77 1 

9 Duran, Alexandro Pojoaque Val 1:03.57 1:04.51 1 

10 Lujan, Javin Pojoaque Val 1:09.90 1:09.38 1 

Event 15 Girls 300 Meter Hurdles ========================================================================Name Year School Seed Finals Points 

1 Duchene, Kaelan Alamogordo H 49.19 48.98 7 

2 Castillo, Sofia Belen High S 53.19 53.76 5 

3 Riordan, Anna Alamogordo H 52.34 56.24 4

4 Soe, Saung Alamogordo H 54.10 57.24 3 

5 Castillo, Juliana Alamogordo H 53.45 x1:03.41 

6 Garcia, Aaliyah Belen High S 1:04.93 2 

Goodmacher, Abigail Sue Clevelan 51.29 District Qualified

Event 16 Boys 300 Meter Hurdles ========================================================================Name Year School Seed Finals H# Points 

1 Kotter, Gabe Alamogordo H 40.50 43.05 2 7

2 Griego, Elijah Sue Clevelan 46.54 43.50 2 5

3 Wysong, Evan Sue Clevelan 44.62 44.29 2 4

4 Shendo, Devonte Sue Clevelan 45.06 44.53 2 3 

5 Wallace, William Sue Clevelan 47.73 x47.21 2 

6 Wedlow, Amarius Alamogordo H 48.70 50.48 2 2 

7 Padilla, Alan Pojoaque Val 51.27 1 1 

8 Siseneros, Carlos Pojoaque Val 51.93 51.76 1 

9 Hidalgo, Marques Belen High S 58.22 56.01 1

10 Benavidez, Julian Belen High S 59.81 56.80 1 

11 Ortiz, Aiden Pojoaque Val 57.12 59.11 1

12 Lujan, Javin Pojoaque Val 53.26 x1:10.47 1 

Event 17 Girls 800 Meter Run ========================================================================Name Year School Seed Finals Points 

1 Battle, Ellary Alamogordo H 2:23.76 2:29.45 7 

2 Martinez, Sara Belen High S 2:56.05 5 

3 Towles, Elizabeth Pojoaque Val 3:04.16 2:57.24 4 

4 Sanchez, Lisette Belen High S 2:58.14 3

5 Romero, Danielle Pojoaque Val 3:03.14 3:11.92 2 

6 Serna, Kaylee Pojoaque Val 3:15.46 3:17.21 1 7 Bob, Jaelynn Belen High S 3:19.21

Event 18 Boys 800 Meter Run ========================================================================Name Year School Seed Finals Points
  1 Nunn, Caden Sue Clevelan 2:06.00 2:02.16 7 

2 Fragua, Jonathan Sue Clevelan 2:06.00 2:06.96 5

3 Smothermon, Dylan Sue Clevelan 2:13.00 2:15.05 4

4 Martinez, Diego Belen High S 2:13.60 2:16.42 3

5 Gagnon, Michael Alamogordo H 2:16.00 2:18.35 2 

6 Dancy, Ronald Sue Clevelan 2:15.00 x2:22.78 

7 Pacheco, Adam Pojoaque Val 2:28.01 2:29.34 1 

8 Sullivan, Jacob Pojoaque Val 2:39.52 2:36.33 

9 Hibpshman, Jared Alamogordo H 2:44.50 2:39.10

10 Tiede, Lucas Pojoaque Val 2:42.65 2:39.47

11 Martinez, Henry Pojoaque Val x2:43.19 

12 Lopez, Adrian Belen High S 3:07.15 2:54.29 

Event 19 Girls 1600 Sprint Medley ========================================================================School Seed Finals Points 

1 Sue Cleveland High School ‘A’ 5:02.14 4:33.16 10 

2 Belen High School ‘A’ 5:09.91 4:58.23 8 

3 Alamogordo High School ‘A’ 4:45.00 5:13.91 6 

4 Pojoaque Valley High School ‘A’ 6:41.93 4 

Event 20 Boys 1600 Sprint Medley ========================================================================School Seed Finals Points 

1 Sue Cleveland High School ‘A’ 3:52.18 3:50.31 10

2 Alamogordo High School ‘A’ 4:01.87 4:06.55 8 

3 Belen High School ‘A’ 4:29.73 4:29.87 6

4 Pojoaque Valley High School ‘A’ 4:37.97 4:36.87 4 

Event 21 Girls 200 Meter Dash ========================================================================Name Year School Seed Finals H# Points 

1 Martin, Justyse Alamogordo H 26.28 26.40 2 7 

2 Stinson, Yvonne Alamogordo H 26.85 26.79 2 5 

3 Quintana, Alicia Pojoaque Val 26.43 27.54 2 4 

4 Adams, Rebecca Alamogordo H 28.14 28.62 2 3 

5 Shaw, Haley Alamogordo H 28.69 x29.07 2

6 Quintana, Sonya Pojoaque Val 30.21 29.71 1 2

7 Horn, Danialle Sue Clevelan 30.01 30.72 2 1 

8 Dannenberg, Ashley Sue Clevelan 30.84 1

9 Lopez, Maesyn Belen High S 29.55 32.29 2

10 Gomez, Analyssa Pojoaque Val 32.44 32.59 1 

11 Wright, Jada Belen High S 32.89 1 

12 Mbonifor, Kaileen Sue Clevelan 34.07 33.24 1

13 Maez, Martina Pojoaque Val 34.39 x34.03 1 

14 Chavez, Emma Belen High S 34.27 1 

Event 22 Boys 200 Meter Dash ======================================================================== Name Year School Seed Finals H# Points 

1 Wysong, Luke Sue Clevelan 22.68 22.37 2 7 

2 Gilbert, Harlon Alamogordo H 23.74 23.19 2 5 

3 Sanchez, Nathan Belen High S 23.78 23.84 2 4 

4 Barraza, Ezequiel Alamogordo H 24.20 24.72 2 3 

5 Moser, Landon Alamogordo H 24.06 24.94 2 2

6 Chilimidos, Jared Belen High S 24.39 25.06 1 1

7 Martinez, D,Sean Pojoaque Val 25.34 25.48 1

8 Sanchez, Jesse Belen High S 26.26 25.70 1 

9 Surpris, Christian Alamogordo H 25.78 x26.38 1 

10 Hall, Zack Pojoaque Val 27.41 29.09 1

11 Gomez, Bryan Pojoaque Val 29.49 30.63 1 

Event 23 Girls 1600 Meter Run ========================================================================Name Year School Seed Finals Points 

1 Shaklee, Janae Alamogordo H 5:45.96 5:56.85 7 

2 Toya, Elise Sue Clevelan 6:35.14 6:33.16 5

3 Towles, Elizabeth Pojoaque Val 6:38.11 6:34.20 4 

4 Weideman, Marina Sue Clevelan 6:41.54 6:34.44 3

5 Wright, Ahnaleigha Belen High S 7:05.84 2 

6 Silva, Iris Belen High S 7:10.87 1

Event 24 Boys 1600 Meter Run ========================================================================Name Year School Seed Finals Points 

1 Humetewa, Chris Sue Clevelan 4:44.47 4:40.63 7

2 Rangel, Ricardo Sue Clevelan 4:46.00 4:50.83 5 

3 Toya, Cody Sue Clevelan 5:00.47 4:57.79 4 

4 Howell, Blayne Sue Clevelan 4:59.75 x5:02.88 

5 Gagnon, Michael Alamogordo H 5:04.00 5:26.61 3

6 Hallbeck, Jack Alamogordo H 5:47.77 5:50.08 2

7 Sisneros, Santos Belen High S 6:13.96 6:13.41 1

8 Padilla, Matias Belen High S 6:01.70 6:25.74 

9 Hall, Elijah Pojoaque Val 6:04.40 6:32.76

10 Tiede, Matias Pojoaque Val 7:02.86 7:13.00 

Event 66 Girls 4×400 Yard Relay ========================================================================School Seed Finals Points 

1 Alamogordo High School ‘A’ 4:13.85 4:18.71 10

2 Sue Cleveland High School ‘A’ 4:33.78 4:28.89 8 

3 Belen High School ‘A’ 4:41.20 4:41.14 6 

Event 67 Boys 4×400 Yard Relay ======================================================================== School Seed Finals Points

1 Alamogordo High School ‘A’ 3:32.88 3:38.01 10

2 Sue Cleveland High School ‘A’ 3:28.93 3:38.67 8

3 Belen High School ‘A’ 4:04.78 4:13.52 6 

4 Pojoaque Valley High School ‘A’ 4:33.09 4:20.98 4 

Event 68 Girls Discus Throw ========================================================================Name Year School Seed Finals Points 

1 Marquez, Macy Alamogordo H 121-02 115-09 7 

2 Ulmer, Kennedy Sue Clevelan 04-01.50 103-02 5 

3 Calabaza, Hennessei Pojoaque Val 37-10 91-03 4 

4 Saiz, Serena Belen High S 80-07 84-00 3 

5 Archuleta, Maya Pojoaque Val 81-09 78-06 2 

6 Lowe, Ava Sue Clevelan 68-02.50 76-01 1 

7 Bonbrake, Riley Sue Clevelan 69-01 73-01

8 Teague, Ashlyn Belen High S 70-03 

9 Trujillo, Leah Pojoaque Val 71-00 67-10 

10 Pattinson, Maliah Alamogordo H 62-11 61-03

11 Baca, Nikki Belen High S 56-06

12 Carrica, Isabel Sue Clevelan 54-07 x53-11 

13 Branch, Lauren Pojoaque Val 42-02.50 x45-00 

Event 69 Boys Discus Throw ========================================================================Name Year School Seed Finals Points 

1 Gray, Jason Sue Clevelan 136-01 134-11 7 

2 Pargas, Estevan Sue Clevelan 123-03 119-09 5 

3 Coyazo, Daniel Alamogordo H 111-04 117-02 4 

4 Bannerman, Camryn Sue Clevelan 104-10 113-11 3 

5 Marquez, Corey Sue Clevelan 121-06 x112-10 

6 Enriquez, Esteban Belen High S 113-06 111-02 2 

7 Vanchaik, Josh Pojoaque Val 95-00 108-09 1 

8 Coyazo, Aiden Alamogordo H 101-00 93-00 

9 Manwill, Matthew Pojoaque Val 90-02 85-07 

10 Ledesma, Donovan Alamogordo H 93-03 85-04 

11 Padilla, Alan Pojoaque Val 84-02 

11 Lopez, Adan Belen High S 73-08 84-02 

13 White, Payton Alamogordo H 95-05 x78-04 

14 Gonzales-rogers, Aidan Belen High S 69-10.50 68-02

15 Sisneros, Santiago Belen High S 66-02 x65-02

16 Jaramillo, Josiah Pojoaque Val x58-09 

Event 70 Girls Shot Put ========================================================================Name Year School Seed Finals Points

  1 Ulmer, Kennedy Sue Clevelan 30-10.00 33-00.00 7 

2 Saiz, Serena Belen High S 32-08.75 31-03.00 5 

3 Calabaza, Hennessei Pojoaque Val 25-06.00 29-05.50 4

4 Marquez, Macy Alamogordo H 31-10.00 28-09.50 3 

5 Carrica, Isabel Sue Clevelan 24-10.00 26-04.00 2

6 Bonbrake, Rylie Sue Clevelan 25-09.50 26-01.50 1 

7 Lowe, Ava Sue Clevelan 28-08.50 x26-00.50 

8 Uroiste, Annica Pojoaque Val 24-03.00

9 Branch, Lauren Pojoaque Val 21-09.00 21-10.50 

10 Hernandez, Yatzhiry Belen High S 18-06.75 19-11.50 

11 Teague, Ashlyn Belen High S 19-07.00 

12 Pattinson, Maliah Alamogordo H 21-06.00 19-04.00

13 Archuleta, Alexis Pojoaque Val 18-08.50 x19-02.00 

Event 71 Boys Shot Put ======================================================================== Name Year School Seed Finals Points 

1 Gray, Jason Sue Clevelan 39-04.50 44-08.00 7

2 LoCoco, Kaden Alamogordo H 45-03.00 44-04.50 5 

3 Jenson, Tyler Sue Clevelan 43-07.50 44-00.00 4

4 Pargas, Estevan Sue Clevelan 47-05.50 43-05.50 3 

5 Bannerman, Camryn Sue Clevelan 43-06.75 x40-01.50 

6 Cruz, Joaquin Alamogordo H 40-05.00 40-00.00 2

7 Coyazo, Daniel Alamogordo H 39-09.50 39-04.25 1 

8 Enriquez, Esteban Belen High S 40-00.25 37-03.00 

9 Vanchaik, Josh Pojoaque Val 32-11.00 32-10.00 

10 Manwill, Matthew Pojoaque Val 34-04.00 31-10.00 

11 Gonzales-rogers, Aidan Belen High S 32-07.00 30-03.00 

12 Sisneros, Santiago Belen High S 28-07.25 28-09.50 

13 Lopez, Adan Belen High S 31-03.75 x27-06.00 

14 Padilla, Alan Pojoaque Val 24-07.00 

15 Gaskill, Isaiah Alamogordo H 32-06.00 x22-09.00 — 

Waters, Deymian Pojoaque Val ND 

Event 72 Girls High Jump ======================================================================== Name Year School Seed Finals Points  

1 Stinson, Yvonne Alamogordo H 5-00.00 5-02.00 7 

2 Goodmacher, Abigail Sue Clevelan 5-00.00 5-00.00 5

3 Savage, Baylee Sue Clevelan 4-07.00 4-06.00 4 

4 Castillo, Evelyn Alamogordo H 4-06.00 4-04.00 3 Baca, Esperanza Sue Clevelan 4-03.00

NH — Soe, Saung Alamogordo H 4-04.00 

NH Event 73 Boys High Jump ========================================================================Name Year School Seed Finals Points 

1 Savage, Cole Sue Clevelan 5-06.00 6-01.00 7 

2 Kotter, Gabe Alamogordo H 5-10.00 5-07.00 5

3 Spencer, Klevon Alamogordo H 5-06.00 5-05.25 4 

4 Wedlow, Amarius Alamogordo H 

5-06.00 5-05.00 3 

Sell, Zack Alamogordo H 5-08.00 NH 

Event 74 Girls Long Jump ========================================================================Name Year School Seed Finals Points

1 Stinson, Yvonne Alamogordo H 15-02.00 16-05.75 7 

2 Mamuya, Nia Sue Clevelan 14-10.00 14-11.50 5 

3 Duchene, Kaelan Alamogordo H 15-01.50 13-11.75 4 

4 Jamerson, Arianna Sue Clevelan 15-03.75 13-07.00 3 

5 Riordan, Anna Alamogordo H 13-08.25 12-11.50 2 

6 Fresquez, Selena Belen High S 14-11.00 12-10.00 1 

7 Tuttle, Alisha Belen High S 13-09.00 12-07.50

8 Wright, Jada Belen High S 10-10.50 

9 DeAguero, Alanna Pojoaque Val 10-00.00 10-08.00

10 Chavez, Emma Belen High S x9-09.50

Castillo, Juliana Alamogordo H 14-00.00 ND 

Event 75 Boys Long Jump ======================================================================== Name Year School Seed Finals Points 

1 Wysong, Luke Sue Clevelan 22-05.50 22-02.50 7

2 Avila, Antonio Sue Clevelan 21-04.25 5 

3 Wysong, Evan Sue Clevelan 20-10.00 19-11.50 4 

4 Moser, Landon Alamogordo H 20-01.00 19-03.25 3

5 Murphy, David Sue Clevelan 20-01.00 x18-09.00 

6 Sanchez, Jesse Belen High S 18-03.00 18-03.00 2 

7 Rodriguez, Edgardo Belen High S 16-08.50 1 

8 Tibbs, Sam Belen High S 17-10.00 16-05.75 

9 Bernal, Ivan Alamogordo H 17-05.00 16-04.25 

10 Leyba Holmes, Devonn Pojoaque Val 19-01.00 16-02.00 

11 Ocoha, Jesus Alamogordo H 14-09.50

12 Melloy Chavez, Ethan Pojoaque Val 

13-02.50 14-07.50 

Fresquez, Nicholas Belen High S 14-06.00 ND

Event 76 Girls Javelin Throw ========================================================================Name Year School Seed Finals Points 

1 Lessentine, Sierra Alamogordo H 103-00 100-03 7

2 Ulmer, Kennedy Sue Clevelan 100-09 99-11 5 

3 Torres, Ariana Alamogordo H 98-00 94-03 4 

4 Bonbrake, Riley Sue Clevelan 73-11 75-09 3 

5 Carrica, Isabel Sue Clevelan 71-10 72-10 2 

6 Saiz, Serena Belen High S 83-09 70-06 1 

7 Baca, Nikki Belen High S 69-10 

8 Lowe, Ava Sue Clevelan 66-00 x67-02

9 Calabaza, Hennessei Pojoaque Val 55-00 64-04

10 Archuleta, Maya Pojoaque Val 60-04 58-08 

11 Trujillo, Leah Pojoaque Val 72-04 51-01

12 Teague, Ashlyn Belen High S 49-03 

13 Archuleta, Alexis Pojoaque Val 50-06.50 x45-08 

14 Hernandez, Yatzhiry Belen High S x44-03 

Event 77 Boys Javelin Throw ======================================================================== Name Year School Seed Finals Points 

1 Jenson, Tyler Sue Clevelan 183-03 182-06 7 

2 Gray, Jason Sue Clevelan 144-00 149-00 5

3 Enriquez, Esteban Belen High S 140-06 136-08 4 

4 Lopez, Adan Belen High S 118-00 131-11 3 

5 Pacheco, Adam Pojoaque Val 111-03 130-09 2 

6 Bowen, Jimmy Alamogordo H 144-05 128-00 1 

7 Gonzales-rogers, Aidan Belen High S 121-00 120-05 

8 Cruz, Joaquin Alamogordo H 105-09 104-00 

9 Tibbs, Sam Belen High S x99-08 

10 Anthony, Connor Alamogordo H 91-02.50 99-01 

11 Padilla, Alan Pojoaque Val 94-10 

12 Manwill, Matthew Pojoaque Val 79-02 90-01

13 Vanchaik, Josh Pojoaque Val 82-00 x71-02.50 

Davison, Jeff Sue Clevelan 152-00 ND 

Event 78 Girls Pole Vault ======================================================================== Name Year School Seed Finals Points 

1 Gerou, Eva Alamogordo H 8-07.00 7-09.25 7 

2 Dannenberg, Ashley Sue Clevelan 7-09.00 5 

Medina, Jade Sue Clevelan NH — Jones, Gabrielle Sue Clevelan 6-03.00 NH 

Event 79 Boys Pole Vault ======================================================================== Name Year School Seed Finals Points

1 McKinney, Logan Sue Clevelan 10-00.00 10-03.00 7 

2 Marquez, Joey Alamogordo H 10-06.00 9-09.25 5 

3 Joseph, Michael Sue Clevelan 10-00.00 9-09.00 4 

4 Melendrez, Xavier Alamogordo H 8-06.00 8-09.00 3 

Ford, Brayden Sue Clevelan NH

Event 80 Girls Triple Jump ========================================================================Name Year School Seed Finals Points

1 Esquero, Alyssa Alamogordo H 31-11.00 31-04.00 7 

2 Riordan, Anna Alamogordo H 31-01.00 28-05.25 5 

3 Neilson, Michaela Alamogordo H 28-03.50 27-10.25 4 

4 Koehler, Lynley Alamogordo H 29-10.00 x27-08.75 

5 Mbonifor, Kaileen Sue Clevelan 27-11.00 27-05.25 3

6 Garcia, Aaliyah Belen High S 28-09.75 26-09.25 2 

7 Castillo, Sofia Belen High S 28-05.50 26-03.75 1 

8 Tuttle, Alisha Belen High S 26-09.50 25-05.50 

Event 81 Boys Triple Jump ========================================================================Name Year School Seed Finals Points

1 Gilbert, Harlon Alamogordo H 42-05.00 41-02.00 7 

2 Sanchez, Jesse Belen High S 37-04.00 39-06.50 5

3 Moser, Landon Alamogordo H 38-05.50 38-02.50 4

4 Holt, Wyatt Alamogordo H 34-04.00 33-08.50 3

5 Sheets, Blaze Belen High S 33-08.75 32-08.25 2 

Hidalgo, Marques Belen High S ND — Martinez, Diego Belen High S 29-01.50 ND 

========================================================================

Women – Team Rankings – 20 Events Scored 

1) Alamogordo High School 208 

2) Sue Cleveland High School 114

3) Belen High School 63 

4) Pojoaque Valley High Scho 53 

========================================================================

Men – Team Rankings – 20 Events Scored 

1) Sue Cleveland High School 221 

2) Alamogordo High School 138 

3) Belen High School 73 

4) Pojoaque Valley High Scho 31

Congratulations Tigers for a job well done.

For a complete history of the Alamogordo Track and Field and Football program to include a listing of ALL District and State Tiger Medalist from 1914 to 1976 check out the book series

Coach Bob Sepulveda The Early Days available at Roadrunner Emporium, 928 New York Avenue Alamogordo and sold online in 36 countries on Amazon.

To see photos of past track and field winners from the 60’s, 70’s and 80’s visit the historical photo archive of Tiger Track and Field at

https://2ndlifemedia.com/coach-bob-sepulveda-books

“Don’t follow your dreams, chase them!” Alamogordo Town News Positive Thoughts

As we remind our readers, podcast listeners and partners daily concerning our affirmations; a habit is “a settled or regular tendency or practice, especially one that is hard to give up.” Habits become a lifestyle a “glass half full” mindset becomes a lifestyle and that leads to permanent results. Science and real-world experience tell us that it actually takes a minimum of 28 days to begin to form a habit, but on average its really between 60 to 90 days. For most of us 90 days is a much more effective and realistic timeframe to incorporate a new behavior into our life, thus 90 Days To A Glass Half Full Lifestyle.

Our Daily Action Steps Are To:

  • Commit to taking 5 minutes each morning as you begin your day to read the daily quote.
  • If you are moved or inspired by the quote; share it in an email, phone call, conversation, text, tweet or on your social media network or platform. When we share something, it becomes more real to us.
  • In your own words write in a journal how the quote or thought applies to you or your circumstances, today. If it doesn’t write on your page the first thing that comes into your mind after reading the quote.
  • The end of the day, prior to bed, take 5 more minutes for yourself. Re-read the quote again and write or think of how you applied or took an action today with a person, situation or referenced the daily quote in mind. Reflect on the day, was there any event in the day where your thinking was impacted differently because of the quote or the affirmation.
  • Let’s have fun with the system and commit.
  • Now, Let’s begin with today’s affirmation:
“Don’t follow your dreams, chase them!”

Beginning of Day: How’s the above quote apply to me or what comes to mind when reading the quote above?

End of day: Re-read the quote. Did I share the quote or apply any of its meaning into any part of my day? What issue or situation made me think of or refer to the quote above? Did it help me bridge a positive outcome or mindset?

We encourage you to write or journal your thoughts or reflections on today’s quote.

“Don’t follow your dreams, chase them!”

It’s your life, express yourself as your true and honest self and let’s work together for self improvement and a Glass Half Full mindset.

Author Chris Edwards lectures, has his podcast and writes. His book series 90 Days to a Glass Half Full Lifestyle is 3 part series that garnered much acclaim from many coming out of rehab and those coming out of incarceration and beginning anew. His other book series, book 1 Coach Bob Sepulveda The Early Days is an inspirational sport history of interscholastic sports in New Mexico. All of his books are found at fine independent book sellers such as Roadrunner Emporium, 928 New York Avenue, Alamogordo, New Mexico and available via Amazon in 36 countries.

Listen to our report and positive affirmations via our podcasts or check us out online at

https://2ndlifemediaalamogordo.town.news/g/alamogordo-nm/n/29501/positive-news-daily-affirmation-5-10-21-28-days-habit-90-days-lifestyle

History and A Spotlight on Women’s Entrepreneurship – New Mexico Leads the Nation-Author & Positivity Coach Chris Edwards

A spotlight on women’s entrepreneurship and the changes in business over the last several decades nationally, in New Mexico and in Alamogordo.

Per Wendy Diamond who is CEO and Founder of Women’s Entrepreneurship Day Organization“Today, women account for 85 percent of consumer purchases and control $20 trillion in global spending. At the same time, they perform 66 percent of the world’s work (both paid and unpaid) yet only earn 10 percent of the world’s income. In the U.S., there are approximately 10 M woman-owned businesses, generating $1.3T in revenue and employing 7.8 M people. This number is expected to increase by 90 percent in the next five years, with 500,000 new businesses being created each year in the U.S. alone. At the same time, 1 in 3 women in America lives in poverty and of the 1.3M people living in severe poverty globally, 70 percent are women and girls.

Women in developed and developing nations alike are becoming increasingly active participants in local and global economies at a rapid rate. Today, in the United States, 38% of new businesses are founded by women, but only between 2-6% of them receive VC funding. One recent survey of 350 woman-owned tech startups revealed that 80% of founders used their own savings to launch their businesses. At the same time, an increase of women in leadership positions from zero to just 30% is associated with a 15% increase in profitability. Women are the world’s most responsible borrowers, paying back microloans worldwide today at a 97% rate of return. 90% of the money they earn is used to educate their children and to provide for their families.”

Terry Powell ofForbes Coaches Council reports, “In 1972, women-owned businesses represented just 4.6% of all businesses, but today, that number has skyrocketed to 42%, according to a 2019 American Express report.”

With the world of Covid-19 small businesses and female owned businesses took a huge hit. However research is showing female owned businesses are bouncing back and were quicker to adapt to the changes in the market.

Today more than 11.6 million businesses are owned by American women. That’s according to the National Association of Women Business Owners. Those firms employ almost 9 million people and, generate around $1.7 trillion in sales.

In 2019, 1,817 new women-owned businesses were created every day in America. While we don’t yet know how many women-owned businesses were formed during the Covid-19 pandemic yet, it seems likely that the numbers continued to increase. Some evidence suggests that far more startups were created than usual; applications for employer identification numbers, a sign that new people are starting companies, also increased.

Women are increasingly turning to franchises as a way to start a business. It has become commonplace for women to be interested in buying a franchise. Women own or co-own about 265,000 franchises, which is about 35% of all U.S. franchises. That’s about a 24% rise from ten years ago.

Female Entrepreneurship and empowerment is not just limited to business in New Mexico it began in government and led to leadership in business.

In New Mexico, women have broken glass ceilings throughout history. Women have served in elected office since before statehood: The first Hispanic female legislators in the United States served in New Mexico’s territorial legislature in 1895. Soledad Chávez Chacón was elected secretary of state in 1922 and was the first woman to serve as acting governor in the United States. Following statehood in 1912, Fedelina Gallegos and Porfirria Hidalgo Saiz, who both served in the New Mexico Legislature from 1931 to 1932, were the first Hispanic women state legislators in the United States.

New Mexican women continue to be history makers and influencers. According to Rutgers University’s Center for American Women and Politics, two of the three women of color who have been elected governor are from New Mexico, including our current governor, Michelle Lujan Grisham. U.S. Rep. Deb Haaland, D-N.M., is one of two Native women to ever be elected to Congress and is now the first Native American to be named to the Cabinet Post as the Secretary of the Department of the Interior.

There have been recent leaps in women’s representation in the Legislature — 35 percent of the state legislators are women and nearly 50 percent of the New Mexico House members are women.

New Mexican women have held commanding roles in other sectors, too. New Mexico ranks first in the nation for female-owned businesses, with nearly 52 percent of New Mexico businesses owned or co-owned by women, in comparison to the national rate of 42 percent.

Within Alamogordo in 1997 only 29.1% of the businesses registered were female owned, more recently that number of female owned verses male owned or public companies has elevated to 41.4%. Still lagging the state average and more inline with the national average. The number shows progress but also shows the city, county and state can do better in partnering and fostering growth and support of female entrepreneurship.

Alamogordo is in a transitional state. There are 1000s of square feet of retail space that is vacant, yet there was a recent upgrade to White Sands National Monument to National Park Status. Now is the opportunity as the city and region comes out of a Covid-19 dark winter to bring some light, to work with women, POC and the minorities communities to expand the business community and bring about a huge economic turnaround to the city, state, region and nation.

Our congressional leaders, state, county and city government leaders must partner with the business community to nurture women into business within Alamogordo and Southern New Mexico.

The goal of the women entrepreneurship education and training should be to:
• Empower women through entrepreneurship to enable them achieve economic self –
sufficiency;
• To help women gain strong business and life management skills that will enable
them to become leaders in their work and personal lives, and become strong role
models;
• To spur the growth of locally controlled business and create new jobs within
neighborhood;
• To provide business experience;
• To promote entrepreneurship by emphasizing the importance of small business as
the creator of jobs, leading to prosperity;
• To enable to potential entrepreneurs to emerge by assisting them in evaluating
their training program;
• To encourage business start-ups by offering a comprehensive entrepreneurship their
training program;
• To develop new markets and help mobilize the capital resources needed; and
• To introduce new technology, industries and products and to create new
employment opportunities.

Entrepreneurship among women, no doubt improves the wealth of the city, state and nation in
general and of the family in particular. Women today are more willing to take up activities
that were once considered the preserve of men, and have proved that they are second to
no one with respect to contribution to the growth of the economy. November 19th is Women’s Entrepreneurship Day; today, as we begin the Spring and awaken from the Covid-19 Winter, let’s each in a position of responsibility commit to mentor, encourage, support and empower more females into business leadership and business ownership and then on November 19th reflect on the good opportunities this partnership led to and the prosperity that will soon follow.

https://2ndlifemediaalamogordo.town.news/g/alamogordo-nm/n/26999/history-and-spotlight-womens-entrepreneurship-new-mexico-leads-nation

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