From the roots of Alamogordo High School athletics, excellence is handed from one generation to the next – the record of Greg Stephens class of 1985 and the success of his young daughter Madeline Stephens…

Alamogordo High School Sports Fun Fact:

Alamogordo has had 2 undefeated football seasons since its inception and first football game played in 1912. Those seasons were 1936 and 1985. In 1936 the Tigers tied Deming and were undefeated 7 games. The season of 1985, however set a record in that it was the first and only untied and undefeated season since 1912.

Photo Greg Stephen’s Alamogordo Football Quarterback in 1985 and Madeline Stephen’s his daughter, 2021 USATF Regional Hammer Throw Champion, Nationals qualifier and medalists in Javelin and Discus.

An Alamogordo Tiger Football recap -1985

Coach Hveem did a presentation kicking off the new season with a Century Club kickoff covered by the Alamogordo News on August 4, 1985. The spirit of Tiger football was burning bright according to Coach Gary Hveem who proceeded to discuss the team and recognize some key athletes.

                Wilson Holland was introduced as a returning letterman and Coach Hveem, said, “Holland exemplified the attitude shown by a serious player during the summer.” “Guys like this young man made a commitment and made it personally and taken and engulfed others with enthusiasm needed to play. The team wants to win, Alamogordo wants a winning team. These young men do not want to be part of a second losing record. They have prepared well,” he spoke passionately.

                He noted that Ted Cisneros and Jeff Fulton would be moving into coaching ranks.  He said they had 65 participants in the conditioning drills over the summer so the team would have depth.

The New Mexico Activities Association changed its’ policy beginning with the 1985/86 season that allowed for an 11th game for high school teams. Hveem’s thoughts were that this could prove to be a disadvantage, as Alamogordo was not able to pick up am extra game due to scheduling conflicts however, competitors such as Clovis, Roswell and Hobbs were able.

The team opened regular season September 13, 1985. The Tigers were to play 10 games in a row.

                By October 18th1985, things were looking particularly good for the Tiger football team for the 85 Season. They were gaining momentum and confidence with a 5-0 record and the community was rallying behind them with an unprecedented level of support.

                The team was hosting pre-game pep rallies that included the public. The business community was decorating their stores and showing the Tiger colors with pride.  But the season was about to get significantly more difficult, as they were soon to take on Carlsbad, Hobbs, Clovis and Roswell. The Clovis team was viewed as the biggest threat, but Coach Hveem spoke with confidence to the press about going for the gold this season.

                The AP also viewed this team from Alamogordo favorably in their ratings, thus the team was feeling the pressure to perform.

                The dream indeed came through the 85season with the game on Friday November 15th, 1985, bringing the Alamogordo team to a 10-0 season. The team entered the history books with a 32-16 victory over Roswell.

Besides winning the district championship outright, the perfect regular season performance represented the first time in the schools 73-year football history to have a team go through regular season with no losses and no ties.

Greg Stephen’s as quarterback was a young 16-year-old junior. He was only the 2nd Junior to ever start for Head Football Coach Gary Hveem and the only to lead a team to an undefeated season, a record still not broken under the leadership of a junior class quarterback.

Going into the season Coach Hveem was “not convinced” on Stephen’s abilities but JV Football Coach and Head Track and Field Coach, Robert Sepulveda convinced Hveem to give Stephens a chance, and take a second look at the “slow of foot” player for quarterback.

Coach Hveem had a quote before he started Stephens was, “Stephens, you look like a fish out of water moving, but you do great things once you get there.”

That indeed proved to be true.  A new school season record was broken prior to the last game of the season by Quarterback Greg Stephens.  He set a new school record with a total of 1660 yards made in the air, with an average of 16.6 per toss as of the Roswell game. Stephens got the lions share or 1604 yards with 102 completions in 181 attempts, for the season. Terry Davis made the remaining yardage. The previous record for the team, 1488 yards in 1978 in the air attacks.

The Tigers entered this regular season ending game coming from a tough game the prior week with Clovis. They had not beaten that district rival since 1980.

                As the season ended, Alamogordo had battled back from the prior seasons 4 to 6 showing. It was said that this season the Tigers ruled what some in New Mexico called the southern “Murderer’s row” at 10-0 and 4-0.

                The Tigers went into the state playoffs with the homefield advantage over Del Norte.

                For Senior Anthony Branch, the night was particularly sweet. Two years prior as a sophomore, he dropped what would have been the winning pass in the final game of the regular season against Roswell, a loss which kept the Tigers that year from the playoffs. He lived with that but carried forward with a passion and perseverance.

                This go around Branch showed the Coyotes how to play the game- he scored on a 3-yard run with 3:59 remaining in the 3rd Quarter- and then put the game away at the 6:06 mark in the fourth quarter on a second downplay for an 83-yard run.

                Anthony Branch’s run, in which he broke several tackles, came after the Tiger defense had stopped a Roswell drive at the Tigers 15-yard line.

On the night Branch rushed for 110 yards on 9 attempts and covered 47 yards in 3 receptions.

                The run made the night. Coach Hveem said of Branch and that night in the Alamogordo News, “Nothing was said, but we both know Anthony did not have to agonize anymore about what happened 2 years ago. He more than redeemed himself and has proven to be a formidable athlete.”

                Roswell fought hard. They pulled out all the stops frustrating the Tiger defense during the opening periods.

Roswell Quarterback Sean Reeves did some fancy running and throwing and was difficult to stop till the second period.

                Alamogordo’s Tony Gonzalez started the scoring with 8:52 remaining in the opening period. He ran in from the two after the Tigers had control of the ball over a 70-yard drive following the opening kickoff. The Tigers had a 7-0 first quarter lead after a Brad Adams kick.

                Roswell scored in the second after John Singleton ambled 3 yards and Peter Sanders made the two-point conversion at the 9:49 mark in the second period. This gave the Coyotes their only lead.

                Adams gave the Tigers back the lead with a 20-yard field goal with 1:29 remaining before the half.

                                Coach Hveem said, “he talked a long time with his team during the halftime and came out once and I felt we were flat, so we went back in and talked a little bit more as a team.”

                Alamogordo’s defense started to move. First came Branch’s score, followed by a two-point run by Terry Davis.

                In the fourth, Branch showed his stuff, followed by another Adams kick to etch the score 25-8.

                A costly 15-yard pass interference penalty against Alamogordo set up the final Coyote score- a 30-yard run by Peter Sanders in the 4th quarter.

                Alamogordo continued to work its ground game, eating up the clock. With 4 seconds remaining, the record setting performance was announced- and the crowd started to head onto the track ready to run onto the field in celebration.

                However, it was not over yet. Terry Davis, in as Quarterback, ran from 9 yards out and Adam’s kick was good, and time ran out.

                The field went crazy in celebration, this marked Coach Hveem’s 10th year at Alamogordo, the longest of any Varsity Football coach since the school was founded in 1912, and his first undefeated team in 22 years of coaching up to that point.

                That game night, Alamogordo made 206 yards on the ground and 222 in the air- thanks to the 15 of 20 successes from Quarterback Greg Stephens. Roswell was held to 141 on the ground and 42 in the air.

                Fullback Scotty Pierce has another successful night on the ground, making 56 yards in 13 carries. Jesse Harris had 41 in six tries.

                Gonzales led receivers with 85 yards in 4 catches. David Bailey had 24 yards in three receptions and Wilson Holland 66 in five.

                Alamogordo controlled the downs with 18 to Roswell’s 12. The Tigers were flagged for 5 penalties totaling 50 yards to Roswell’s 3 for 29 yards.

Tigers win again! The Tigers shut out Del Norte in the quarter finals 28-0.          Due to this victory the Tigers would only need two more wins to win the state title. Alamogordo won a state title under Rolla Buck but in the B small school division of the time. The nearest to a state title in the upper division has been Coach Gary Hveem. This makes another chance at the elusive title. Under his leadership there have been multiple state playoffs, but this team trended the best overall.

                During the quarter finals with Del Norte, they played better as the night progressed. Halfback Anthony Branch scored 2 touchdowns and rushed for 122 yards on 9 tries to lead the Alamogordo offense which finished the night with 202 yards rushing.

                It was the Tiger defense that controlled the tempo., holding Del Norte to 94 yards on the ground.

                Del Norte which finished the year 7-4 got inside the Tiger 25-yard line 6 times but was held each time.

                At the 6:36 mark in the 2nd Quarter the Tiger’s offense took off.

                Greg Davis took a punt and zipped his way through the Del Norte defense 66 yards.

                The Tigers struck back again 4 minutes later in the 2nd quarter after only 2 plays. Quarterback Greg Stephens hit Tony Gonzalez with a 25-yard throw to key the drive. Then it was Anthony Branch who strolled through the Del Norte defense for a 44-yard touchdown.

                Branch struck gold again at the &15 in the 3rd Quarter capping a 5-play drive, this time going 39 years in the 3rd Quarter to give the Alamogordo Tigers a 21-0 lead.

                Alamogordo scored once more in the 4th Quarter at 7:15 when Fullback Scotty Pierce ran from 1 yard out.

                Brad Adams who had only missed 2 conversion kicks in 11 games, was 4 for 4 for the night.

                Stephens finished the night with 104 yards with 7 of 9 completions. Gonzalez was 2nd in the Tiger rushing department with 50 yards in 9 tries. Gonzales let the Tigers in receptions with 34 yards and 2 tries with Branch with 32 yards and 1 catch and finally Wilson Holland with 30 yards in 3 catches.

                Matt Fleming of the Tigers was injured with an

Ankle sprain that came from an illegal block that was not called.

                Team spirit and community support was at an all-time high going into the Tigers attempt at victory in the State Semi-finals AAAA competition in football. The Mayor of Alamogordo declared Tiger Pride Day in a mayoral proclamation for Friday November 29, 1985. The proclamation noted the historic record set by Alamogordo setting a record in the schools 71-year history. It went on to congratulate the team for showing outstanding teamwork and sportsmanship, plus being good representatives of Alamogordo for the state tournament.

                Alamogordo moved into the semi-finals to compete against Albuquerque Highland High School hosted at Alamogordo. The game garnered so much support the band was moved to the field instead of the stands and extra temporary bleachers were erected to expand crowd capacity.

                Due to the excitement and the seriousness of play extra security was dispatched and the opposing team received a police escort in and out of town along with assistance of the state police.  KOB had circulated some stories in newscast of overly rambunctious fans on the Alamogordo side potentially creating havoc or having potentially created havoc in the quarterfinals game. Investigations occurred and it was deemed a non-issue.

                Alamogordo secured a win in the semi-finals against Albuquerque Highlands with a score of 28-6 adding a 12 straight game record to the Alamogordo books. Alamogordo’s season was thus 12-0 verses Highland finishing a 7-5 season.

                The leader on the night was Alamogordo fullback Scotty Pierce. Pierce scored all 4 touchdowns. He ran in from 3 yards out and 3 times from 1 yard out. He finished with 69 yards and 16 carries. He also passed the ball of 22 yards on a key play early in the game.

                After controlling the ball through most of the 1st Quarter, Alamogordo took an early lead in the opening seconds of the 2nd Quarter, when Pierce competed an 18 play, 80-yard drive with a 3-yard plunge on 4th down.

Brad Adams added the extra point- the first of 4 on the night.

                Later in the quarter, two Highland errors directly led to Tiger scores.

                Alamogordo took advantage of a short punt deep in Highland’s territory to set up Pierce’s first 1-yard run, making it 14-0. Alamogordo struck at the 8:44 mark.

                The Tigers struck 2 minutes later when following Tiger David Bailey’s interception of a Garrett Young pass, Anthony Branch returned it to the Highland 1 yard line. Pierce scored on a 1-yard run and Adams’s kick made it 21-0 at the 6:15 point.

Pierce gave the Tigers their final score with another 1-yard run in the opening seconds of the 4th quarter. 

                Highland Coach Bill Gentry credited the Tiger win to the teams “rolling right.” “Alamo did the right things”, he concluded in a recap conversation about his team’s loss. Alamogordo quarterback, Greg Stephens completed 9 of 17 passes for 134 yards with Wilson Holland catching 3 for 34 yards and Anthony Branch catching 3 for 59 yards. Jesse Harris was second behind Pierce in the rushing department with 35 yards on 7 runs.

                On the negative side, Alamo lost 2 fumbles and was flagged for 8 penalties for over 80 yards. The overall game was a huge victory for Alamogordo and placed them 1 game away from a historic 1st State Title as a AAAA competition.     Going into the state finals with Clovis was Coach Gary Hveem’s 200th game coaching. His career average going into the finals was 142 wins, 54 losses and 3 ties. At Alamogordo he had 10 years of coaching with 77 wins, 32 losses and 2 ties.

So close but No Cigar

                The Clovis Wildcats behind their powerful offense keyed by senior running back Daren Kelley and a defense that was playing for pride and a measure of revenge, crushed the Alamogordo Tigers 36-12 for the State Football Title. The Tigers had to again settle for a state second place trophy.

                A bet between Clovis Mayor, Frank Murray, who bet a bushel of grain that Clovis would win verses Alamogordo

Mayor Don Carroll, with a bushel of apples that Alamogordo would win. Unfortunately, the apples carried the bet, and were handed to the Clovis Mayor by Alamogordo Mayor Don Carroll pictured.

                Even in the face of a loss the Tiger fans were full of enthusiasm and proud their boys got a 2nd Place State Trophy.                             

Coach Gary Hveem & Co-Captains Anthony Branch and Tony Gonzalez claimed the state runner up trophy marking the winningest season in the history of Tiger football.

(Photo’s courtesy Alamogordo News.)

                “It’s tough,” said the wife of Tiger Coach Gary Hveem, Ms. Fran Hveem. Her husband had been chasing the New Mexico class AAAA state football title for 10 years. For the 2nd time in that decade, the title escaped his grasp in a title game and historically was the 2nd time in the school’s history as a class AAAA school.

                Former New Mexico State Senator Aubrey Dunn commented to the Alamogordo News, “The team played

great all year. These were two of the greatest teams in the state without question.”

                Chuck Montjoy another fan and supporter of the Tiger team said, “the team played terrific, the boys had a super season they are still #1 in my book.”

                The community was hungry for a win with a record 10,000 plus crowd in the stands filling both side and additional bleachers brought in for the game.

                The community showed support before the game and after. Trinity Lutheran Church Reverend Charles Ullman expressed, “this was a great opportunity for people to set aside their problems and unify around the local community.” One fan Rex (Doc) Hutchinson told the Alamogordo News, he had a dream that the Tigers won 39-6. The dream did not quite turn out as he envisioned as the final score was 36-12.

                Sue DeWolf one of the Tiger fans at the game that night told the Alamogordo News editor Mike Lamb as reported in the December 8th edition, that she had been supporting the Tiger Football program for over 30 years and every time she came to the game, she carried an exceptionally large stuffed Tiger with her. She said, “Every game he is with me, any bigger and they’d probably make me purchase a ticket for him” She was a determined fan indeed.

                Toots Green, state representative for Alamogordo at the time was at the game. He thought it was great Clovis was playing as that was his hometown but game night for the state title in 1986, he said he was, “rooting for Alamogordo.”

                State Senator Bill Vandergriff was in attendance and stated, “I think this is the greatest game for Alamogordo in 50 years. I do not think they have to be ashamed of anything, win or lose. There has been particularly good sportsmanship. I saw no problems on the field at all and the team is the best Alamogordo has put forward over the past 50 years.”

                Alamogordo Athletic Director Glen Markham said of the game, “It was a tremendous first half, I would like to have seen the game end at the half and call it quits in victory, whatever the outcome the team made Alamogordo proud.” Alamogordo ended the 1st half ahead 12-9.

                The Alamogordo game garnered attention not only in New Mexico but also in distant lands. Dickie Johnson, who was living at the Beirut Hilton in Beirut Lebanon who grew up in Clovis called the Alamogordo Daily News Sports office multiple times during the game from Beirut asking for updates on the game. Dickie had a connection to Clovis and the district as he was the quarterback for the championship team of 1966 and was happy with the outcome of this state competition. Johnson also played for the University of Texas when they were national champions in 1969 so he had a deep interest in regional football. Johnson was working in the oil industry is why he was in the middle east in 1986 or he said he would have been at the game.

                The game was awesome in two strong teams competed and gave their all. The night however favored Clovis sparked by the running feet of Darren Kelley and the Wildcat team took advantage of every opportunity presented to it.

                Kelly rushed for 228 yards on 29 carries on the day to lead the Cats to a stunning 418 yards on the ground.  His performance passed 2000 yards for the season in rushing and crashing though the Alamogordo Tiger defense which had limited past opponents to an average of under 10 points a game.

                “You are champions. Be proud of what have done, not disappointed. This has been my best year in coaching over 22 years,” Coach Gary Hveem told his Tiger team moments after the game ended. He concluded, “Hold your heads high. We had a great record-breaking season. The best team may have won today, but not the best guys.”

                The Tigers were strong the 1st half carrying a 12-9 lead after scoring a beautiful 66-yard pass from Quarterback Greg Stephens to Anthony Branch at 9:36 mark in the first period, and then a 3-yard pass from Stephens to Wilson Holland at 3:35 in the second.

                Not to be outdone, Clovis scored at 6:15 in the opening segment on an 18-yard run by Quarterback Drooper Greenwalt, and then Charles Deckard kicked a 36-yard field goal at the 7:05 point in the second quarter.

                Things started to fall apart for the Alamogordo Tigers in the 3rd quarter as several little things

Combined to break the backs of the Tigers winning streak.

Clovis’s Kelley scored on an 8-yard run at 8:45 in the period to give Clovis a 15-12 lead. In the next Tiger drive, Stephens was sacked at 7:09 to halt momentum.

                When Alamogordo again got the ball, a pass from Stephens to Tony Gonzales was intercepted, and then a short time later Alamo was hit for a holding penalty to further slow the drive.

                Wildcat Sam Dickery grabbed another Stephens pass at the 1:54 point to give Clovis the spark needed. Greenwalt kept his cool and the ball and less than a minute later ran 54 yards deep into Alamogordo’s territory to set up the next score.

                Clovis’s Ron Cook then scampered in from the 2-yard line and Deckard added the extra point to set the kill.

                The Tiger boys struggled valiantly in the 4th quarter but the fire of the last 13 wins was gone.

                A pass from Alamogordo’s Stephens to Holland was broken up at the 10:15 mark with Stephens and Duece Sullivan shaken up on the play. Reserve Quarterback Terry Davis came in – but the Alamogordo team could not keep control and Anthony Hall strolled in from 80 yards at the 7:36 point. Deckard’s kick was good.

                Clovis clobbered a Stephens pass again and forward motion slowed.

 Kelley of Clovis ran in one more score at 1:54 which combined with Deckard’s kick closed the door permanently to a state victory by the Alamogordo Tigers.

                The Alamogordo Tigers went into the state finals with a 12-0 season after finishing the first season in the schools 71-year history of football in 1986. This was a first in its history undefeated and untied. Clovis got into the playoffs thanks to Alamogordo’s district championship over Roswell and had to travel to Santa Fe and Cibola to make it to the finals.

                For the game Alamogordo’s lead rusher was Scotty Pierce with 37 yards in 10 tries. Jesse Harris was right behind with 34 yards in 6 runs.

                On the night, Alamo’s Stephens passed for 137 yards, making 10 of 22 tries with 4 interceptions.

                Anthony Branch was Stephen’s favorite receiver with 64 yards in 3 catches, and Tony Gonzalez was second with one 44-yard grab. Wilson Holland had 22 yards on four tries.

                Strong play was shown by Terrance Roberts, Ruby Rivera, and Matt Fleming.

                “Fans on both sides for 3 hours had nothing to think about but football, I am personally just excited for the kids and a good clean game,” said Clovis Coach, Eric Roanhaus.

                The season was the best season in the career of Coach Gary Hveem while at Alamogordo. Gary Hveem maintains the record as the longest tenured varsity football coach for Alamogordo High. He also continues to hold the record, of the coach with the most state football trophies – 2 of the 3, Alamogordo owned 2nd Place State AAAA trophies, that Alamogordo holds, were secured during his tenure.

                The irony of the season, Alamogordo was undefeated, but the record also played against the team when it came to state playoffs.

                Gary Hveem told AP Sportswriter, Pete Herrera of the 1986 state finals, “I knew all along it would come to this – to a football civil war punctuated by touch of irony and a ton of pressure.”

                The seasons ironic twist is that had it not been for an assist from Alamogordo 3 weeks prior, Clovis would not have been in the finals and Clovis would not have been chasing their bid for a record 5th straight state championship.

                By beating Roswell on the final week of regular season, Alamogordo clinched the district 4AAAA title but in the process handed Clovis the runner up spot in the district and a berth in the playoffs.

                Coach Hveem to the AP, “I knew all along it would be Clovis in the state finals. I’m glad, that the actual best 2 teams, in the state in 86, got to settle the title.”

                Coach Hveem and the Alamogordo boys were trying to do what has never been done to Clovis Coach Eric Roanhaus’s team, which was “to beat them twice in the same year.” Alamogordo beat Clovis 12-7 in district play.

                Clovis Coach, Roanhaus throughout the season had downplayed the significance of being in the running for a potential 5th straight AAAA State Varsity Football Title. He was equally complimentary of Alamogordo and did not want to underestimate their abilities or those of Alamogordo’s Coach Gary Hveem. Roanhaus told the AP’s Pete Herrera, “They (Alamogordo) team members were playing better in the championships than when they at any time in memory. That was a team that was a credible threat and each of those boys should be proud of their efforts.”

Coach Hveem’s legacy was that of the longest tenured football coach in Alamogordo’s history. His legacy also continues to this day, as the winningest coach and the only football coach in its 109-year history to compete in the finals for 2 state titles in 4AAAA play. Though, during his tenure the team never brought home the 1st Place State Trophy, of the 4 State Football Trophies that Alamogordo received in its’ 109-year history, 2 2nd Place State Trophies belong to the decade of Coach Hveem’s leadership.  During the 2006 season Alamogordo Varsity Football won a 2nd Place trophy under Coach Bruce Dollar.

                The NMAA has awarded one 1st Place New Mexico State Football Title to Alamogordo. It was under Coach Rolla Buck in 1950 when Alamogordo won it as a class B school. In 1950 there were 3 divisions Class A, B and C.

While remembering the past of the glory days of the 1985 football season and Greg Stephen’s lest we not forget the title of the article,from the roots of Alamogordo High School athletics, excellence is handed from one generation to the next and the successes of his daughter Madeline Stephens

Greg Stephen’s of Alamogordo Football stardom has an incredibly talented young daughter Madeline Stephens. A student in Texas she has proven herself to be an extremely talented Hammer, Shot, Javelin and Discus Throw competitor. To the point she qualified to compete in the USATF Junior Olympics Regional finals in Texas in the Hammer Throw event.

As we edge through Olympic trials and head toward the Olympics in Japan it is worth noting that the USA Track and Field Junior Olympics are moving forward as well.  With roots tracing back to Ancient Greece, track & field is the centerpiece of the Olympic Games. From the 100-meter dash to the discus throw, hammer throw etc. athletes set new standards for excellence in sport. USATF’s Junior Olympic Track & Field program is a wellspring of this excellence.

America’s next generation of track & field stars compete throughout the summer–and over 6,000 of these athletes qualify for the USATF National Junior Olympic Track & Field Championships held during the last week of July. Entry for the national championship is based on athlete performances at preliminary, Association, and regional levels.

And so, for Greg Stephen’s the legacy of athleticism has shown it does carry down from one generation to the next, as his daughter Madeline Stephens Qualified and Won 1st Place at Regionals in the Hammer Throw.

                As an 8th grader this is an awesome achievement and one of which Mr. and Mrs. Stephen’s should be proud but equally proud of course is Coach Gary Hveem and Alamogordo High Schools Winningest Track and Field Coach in its history, Coach Bob Sepulveda as well as the Alamogordo community as well as her Texas community.

                Congratulation Madeline, your fathers star burned bright in Alamogordo and beyond, but we have great expectations that your star may shine even brighter, with your demonstrated excellence and talent at such an early age. We wish you the absolute best on your journey at the USA Track and Field junior Olympics finals. Know deep in your heart you have fans all over the country rooting for your success.

                Have fun, take in the moments before you and know, though not officially a Tiger, Tiger blood and Tiger Spirits is within you!

Source:

The History of the Alamogordo Class of 1985 is an excerpt from the book, Coach Bob Sepulveda & Gary Hveem, Alamogordo’s Golden Years, by Authors Chris Edwards & Rene Sepulveda, to be released August 30, 2021, at Roadrunner Emporium, 928 New York Avenue, Alamogordo, New Mexico, and at independent bookstores and Amazon.com in 46 countries worldwide.

Details of Madeline Stephen’s courtesy of USA Track & Field.

Author Chris Edwards, 2nd Life Media Inc.

New Mexico led the way to today’s NCAA announcement that it will allow athletes to earn money.

$1.5 billion annually, that’s how much college football’s 25 most valuable teams earn in combined profit in an average year, according to Forbes‘ most recent “College Football’s Most Valuable Teams” list.

College sports generates a tremendous amount of money for universities, but college athletes have long been given little more than a scholarship in return.

Polling has consistently shown a majority of Americans believe college athletes should be paid more though, and NCAA officials have started showing support for allowing players to profit off the use of name, image and likeness, until today.

New Mexico Led The Nation

New Mexico SB 94. Titled STUDENT ATHLETE ENDORSEMENT ACT, Sponsored by Mark Moores, Bill B. O’Neill, and Antonio “Moe” Maestas passed the New Mexico Senate with 39 yes votes and 0 no votes on 2/19/21. The bill then passed the New Mexico House of Representatives with 43, yes votes and 21, no votes.  The governor signed the bill into law on 4/7/21 to take effect July 1st, 2021.

The text of the actually bill signed by the governor is available to read via the text:

The law goes into effect on July 1st, the same day that a similar law will go into effect in the state of Florida, becoming the first two states that will have the laws in effect. 

“The NCAA model is not working for the athletes who drive the product,” Lujan Grisham’s press secretary told the Albuquerque Journal following the pass of the bill on Wednesday.

New Mexico’s law includes that athletes can receive food, shelter, having medical expenses paid for by a third party, or making money based off the use of their name, image, and likeness. Meaning that athletes featured on billboards, in commercials, or in video games can now begin to make money without fear of being declared ineligible. Athletes can also hire agents to set up endorsement deals but cannot hire them to represent them in contact with professional teams.

A total of 10 state have similar laws taking effect in July based on the New Mexico model. The NCAA wants to have federal laws or its own permanent rules regarding the issue known as NIL, but was forced to seek a temporary solution rather than have athletes in some states eligible for compensation while others were not.

Without NCAA action, athletes in some states could be making money without putting their college eligibility in jeopardy while their counterparts in other states could be in danger of breaking NCAA rules.

The NCAA’s stopgap measure comes less than two weeks after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled against the association in a case involving education-related benefits. That 9-0 ruling is expected to impact issues related to compensation for athletes.

The NCAA cleared the way for athletes to profit off their name Thursday, the eve of legislation becoming the law in New Mexico and Florida that would allow for such compensation.

The expected approval from the NCAA Board of Directors came a few days after a recommendation from the Division I Council to allow athletes in every state to pursue compensation for their name, image and likeness without jeopardizing their college eligibility.

The NCAA’s stunning reversal came after California passed a Fair Pay to Play Act, which would go into effect in 2023. Other states are looking at possible legislation. The California law would allow athletes to sign endorsement deals and licensing contracts, something NCAA rule makers will address.

NCAA officials said they were aiming to have a nationwide rollout of the recommendations made among their 1,100 members.

Figuring out all the details of it, it’s going to be a challenge. It’s a much more complex issue than most people see it as. I think schools are going to be able to work through this process and come up with rules that makes great sense for the student athletes and allow universities to continue their collegiate model of athletics, NCAA Officials have said.

NCAA officials said the working group will continue to get feedback on how to deal with state legislation and that will help guide future recommendations.

A very interesting argument in favor of athlete pay was made by the New Mexico Law Review and can be found in the link below…

 New Mexico Law Review -Let’s Get Serious – The Clear Case for Compensating the Student
Athlete – By the Numbers
Neal Newman
Texas A&M University – School of Law

This move follows compliance to a New Mexico state law that takes effect July 1st. 

The New Mexico legislature found itself on the cutting edge beating out typical states such as New York, California or Washington State on a progressive approach to student athlete compensation. What is even more impressive is the bi-partisan support this bill got in the New Mexico legislature with unanimous approval by all New Mexico Senate Republicans and Democrats and example of true bi-partisanship.

The fallout to this new regulation will become a true headache for college coaches and compliance officers creating a whole new set of pressure on those professional staffs. It is conceivable with a superstar collegiate athlete whose likeness is used often could be high paid than the millions of dollars paid to college football coaches. That in itself will ultimately create an interesting dynamic that social scientist and college administrators will be studying for decades into the future. 

When it comes to sports we indeed do live in interesting times in the 21st Century. 

Alamogordo Town News Sports Tiger Girls Track & Field Win 5A State Title & Title History

Congratulations to Alamogordo Track & Field Girls on winning the 5A State Championship!




Alamogordo Girls Interscholastic Track and Field Program began in 1972 under the leadership of Coach Marilyn Sepulveda. Under her leadership she brought home the first State Track and Field Titles for either the Boys or Girls Team in 1982 when there were only 4 divisions. She won the division AAAA State titled in 1982. Following upon the legacy she built of a sound program the team won a state title again in 1990. Leading the team that season was coach Joe Jaramillo
who had been an assistant to Coach Marilyn Sepulveda. The team won the victory in 1990 in honor of Coach Marilyn Sepulveda who died of cancer in 1989. Several of her athletes carried the banner in 1990 in her honor and eventually the prestigious Coach Marilyn Sepulveda Invitational State Qualifying Meet was created in her honor.

The Alamogordo Girls went on to win a state title again in 2017 under Coach Jason Atkinson. Coach Atkinson again proceeded to carry his team this unusually difficult post Covid-19 year to a second title under his leadership winning the girls state title today for 2021. Great job Coach Atkinson!!!

The Western Sky Community Care Class 5A Girls State Track & Field Championships awarded Alamogordo Tiger Girls with the first place title with a score of 79.50, second place went to La Cueva with 53 points and the third place trophy went to Sandia with 51 points. 

The High Point athlete for the day was Adriana Tatum, Sandia with 19 points.

The Tiger Girls Individual Awards went to…

 – 1st (Vanesa Najar, Gabi Sandoval, Janae Shaklee, Ellary Battle – 10:05.51) – State Record800 – Ellary Battle 1st (2:20.69)

Sprint Medley – 2nd (Rebecca Adams, Sydney Thomas, Gabi Sandoval, Michaela Neilson)

4×100 – 2nd (Yvonne Stinson, Justyse Martin, Gracie Walker, Kaelan Duchene – 47.99)

100 – Justyse Martin 2nd (12.05), Yvonne Stinson 3rd (12.15)

200 – Yvonne Stinson 2nd (25.59), Justyse Martin 3rd (25.63)

Discus – Macy Marquez 3rd (117-02)

300 Hurdles – Kaelan Duchene 3rd (46.58)

4×200 – 3rd (Gracie Walker, Kaelan Duchene, Rebecca Adams, Sydney Thomas – 1:48.94)

High Jump – Yvonne Stinson T-3rd (4-10)

4×400 – 4th (Gabi Sandoval, Justyse Martin, Michaela Neilson, Yvonne Stinson)

Pole Vault – Eva Gerou 5th (9-00)

Javelin – Sierra Lessentine 5th (105-03)- Ellary Battle 5th (5:35.42), Janae Shaklee 6th (5:37.53)

Triple Jump – Alyssa Esquero 6th (33-07.75)

Awesome job!!!!

On the boys side:]

Alamogordo High School began an organized sports program in 1912 for Caucasian boys offering PE, Track & Field and Basketball and Football.  In 1913, the authorities of the University of New Mexico believing that one of the great needs of the High Schools of the state was an opportunity to meet, at least once a year in athletic and other contests, organized the University of New Mexico Track Athletic Association. A track meet was held in the spring of that year at Albuquerque, and two high schools, Santa Fe and Albuquerque contested for the banner.

Although the beginning was small, a great deal of interest from across the state was aroused.

Alamogordo High School won its first state medals in 1916/17 School Year and they were in Track and Field via the High Jump and the Triple Jump.

Alamogordo High School boys won the first State Title under Coach Rolla Buck the year that Alamogordo integrated with High School with African American and Hispanic Athletes in 1951.

The results of the State Competition winners include…

  • Bobby Lee, 1st Place, 100 Yard Dash, 9.8
    • Bobby Lee, 1st Place,220 Yard Dash, 21.21.6
    • Bobby Lee, 1st Place, Long Jump, 21’-01.375
    • Norman Kinder, 1st Place, Pole Vault, 10’-10.50”
    • Benny Garcia, 1st Place. Javelin, 193’-01.325

The Alamogordo Tigers Track and Field Team of 1951/52 smashed the competition at the state finals of that year.

They took and won the state competition with 48.5 points. Albuquerque High, the 1951 State Champion scored 21.5 points less for a 2nd place finish of 27 points.

  • Lee in addition to setting 2 state records personally scored 24 ¾ points. He broke the state records in the 100-yard dash by .2 seconds and the 220 by .8 seconds better than the record.
    • Lee was also 3rd Place in Shot Put
  • Benny Garcia shattered the state record in Javelin 11’ 3 ⅛” of 5 state records; the Tigers broke 3 of them.
  • Norman Kinder Placed 1st in Pole Vault with 10’-10.50”
  • Ed McAlpine, 2nd Place. in the state competition in Javelin behind Garcia.
  • Bobby Fritz, 3rd Place, Broad Jump
  • In the sprints in addition to the 1st Place wins of Bobby Lee, Oliver Lee, 4th Place 180 Low Hurdles.
  • The 880 Yard Relay Team consisting of Henderson, Fritz, O Lee and Bobby Lee placed with a 3rd place medal.
  • Benny Garcia shattered the state record in Javelin 11’ 3 ⅛” of 5 state records; the Tigers broke 3 of them.
  • Norman Kinder, 1st Place, Pole Vault, 10’-10.50”

Benny Garcia went on to join the 1956 Olympics…

Alamogordo continued a winning tradition of building a strong track and field team and under Coach Bob Sepulveda the Boys won state titles in 1985, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996 and under Coach Joe Bryant in 2007.

The Alamogordo Boys did a fine showing this difficult 2021 year continuing the tradition of bringing home individual medals to Alamogordo from the State.

 The Alamogordo Boys finished 7th overall this post Covid  5A Track and Field Championships

Individual Scorers Boys

4×400 – 2nd (Ezequiel Barraza, Harlon Gilbert, Omar Enriquez, Gabe Kotter – 3:25.68)

Discus – Kaden LoCoco 3rd (144-08)400 – Harlon Gilbert 3rd (49.63)

200 – Harlon Gilbert 5th (22.76)

Long Jump – Harlon Gilbert 5th (21-04)

4×800 – 5th (Aiden Kepfer, Celso Garcia, Isaiah Dalmas, Omar Enriquez – 8:37.97)

Congratulations to these young men for their commitment and determination to carry on a tradition of Tiger success.

Congratulations to ALL of the athletes that competed this most difficult season, you are each winners and demonstrate the best of New Mexico pride!

To learn more of the history of Alamogordo Track and Field check out Coach Robert Sepulveda The Early Days Book 1 – part of a 3 part book series on Alamogordo Athletics and its history from 1912 to 1976 is Available at Roadrunner Emporium, 928 New York Avenue, Alamogordo, New Mexico or on Amazon and available in 36 countries. Book 2 the Alamogordo Track and Field History and all district and state title holders named from 1976 to 1996 will be available soon!

Some video highlights of the Alamogordo Track and Field 2021 Season and heading to the state meet!<!– EMBEDDED YOUTU.BE URL: https://youtu.be/MeOik5IuLkA –>



Bill Swartz Crossing America for Charity Stops By Roadrunner Emporium & Fine Arts Gallery, 928 New York Avenue, Alamogordo, New Mexico

Dateline: Alamogordo, New Mexico, June 8, 2021

In case you missed the jovial guy on a bike zipping around Alamogordo yesterday, you missed a man of commitment and compassion.

Meet Mike Swartz. While some people have sat back and complained during this dark period of Covid-19 and the new awakening as we come out of it, there are some individuals that didn’t just sit back in self pity but some individuals set a goal and a path forward to help the greater good of their community and followed through on that path forward in enlightenment and action.A view of Bill Swartz journey 

Mike Swartz is one of those individuals. He is bicycling across America from Harbor New Jersey to San Diego to raise awareness and funds for charity.  His solo ride of about 4000 miles in total down the east coast and across the country is to raise money for Bell Socialization Services which began in 1966 as “The Bell Club,” a social gathering for people being discharged from local psychiatric hospitals into the greater York, PA community.  Created with support of the York chapter of Mental Health America and a financial donation from the York Jaycees, early Bell programs included meals and activities hosted by churches and organizations such as the Catholic Women’s Club, the Jewish War Veteran’s Auxilliary, the Jaycees Wives, etc., as well as dances, presentations, and outings.

The organization then engaged to enrich mental health services, in 1977, programs were also added to assist individuals with intellectual disabilities , and in 1986, the agency added shelter services to meet the needs of York County’s homeless families.

Over the years Bell services continued to evolve and expand and, today, about 2,500 people are served each year through dozens of programs offering an array of housing and basic living supports, guided by our Vision, Mission, & Values. Many Bell programs are licensed and/or accredited to meet strict standards of quality care. With more than 50 properties throughout York and Adams counties, people using Bell services are an integral part of the greater community.

You can follow along the remaining parts of Mr. Swartz journey and read his commentary and blog over his encounters along the way ata variety of social media pages which are  devoted to this bicycle ride. ‍ You’ll see photos, video clips and stories about my experiences and the interesting folks I meet as I bicycle across America.
* FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/coasttocoastbicycleride/
* INSTAGRAM: @billswartz3
* WEBSITE for this COASTtoCOASTbicycleride: www.thisclearbluesky.com

We were fortunate to meet this jovial man at Roadrunner Emporium on New York Avenue yesterday. He explained his journey and his passion and moved us with his experiences.

Mr Swartz said he was attracted to the street and to come into Roadrunner Emporium as he heard John a Lennon’s famous “Imagine” being coming from the Emporium and he knew from that inspiring sound he had to check out the Emporium and the historic New York Avenue. Proving once again “music unites us.”Artist Dalia Lopez Halloway and Author Chris Edwards Photographed by Bill Swartz on His Journey

His journey reminds us all that there are good people out there, not just sitting back but taking action from the darkness to bring light to causes and issues that are important to the community and the nation at large.

Humanity is out there if we just keep our eyes open and look for it. Good luck Mr. Swartz.

And to make a donation to the charity follow the link attached:

https://gofund.me/5b660142

To learn more about the charity he is supporting visit:

https://bellsocialization.com/aboutbell/

To see a FOX News Clip on his journey visit The Fox 43 TV news  affiliates video clip that gives a good overview of this coast to coast bicycle ride fundraiser and the charity for which I’m riding:

https://www.fox43.com/mobile/article/news/local/york-county-man-biking-across-the-country-to-raise-money-for-bell-socialization/521-0da649dc-48bb-4053-a4c2-7dde9b59e747?fbclid=IwAR2XGpbTP1JN_RCTKU3wJLQ2VorxOqTvSRc3x8EIwn98XCMLIuTqHD9Q6

SIGN UP!

Alamogordo Town News Sports Report: Alamogordo Sports: Alamogordo High Tigers Boys & Girls Win Bob Sepulveda Invitational Track & Field Meet 6/4/21

Congratulations to the Alamogordo Tigers Track and Field Boys (203 points) and Girls Team (219 Points) Winning the Bob Sepulveda Invitational Meet in competition with Tularosa, Centennial, Las Cruces, Deming and Silver. This win comes on the back of Alamogordo Boys and Girls both winning the Thurman Jordan Relays in Deming on May 28th.

The Lady Tigers again placed First Place with 219 team points

2) Centennial High School 71

3) Las Cruces High School 63 

4) Silver High School 25

5) Deming High School 10 

6) Tularosa High School 5

The Alamogordo Tiger Boys Placed First with 203 points

 2) Centennial High School 72

3) Deming High School 59

4) Las Cruces High School 45

5) Silver High School 15

6) Tularosa High School 7

Individual results supplied by Mile Split NM include…

Event 1 Girls 4×100 Meter Relay Finals
1 Alamogordo High School ‘A’ 49.49
1) Stinson, Yvonne 2) Martin, Justyse
3) Walker, Gracie 4) Adams, Rebecca
2 Las Cruces High School ‘A’ 52.22

Event 2 Boys 4×100 Meter Relay
1 Alamogordo High School ‘A’ 44.95
1) Moser, Landon 2) Kotter, Gabe
3) Gilbert, Harlon 4) Sell, Zack
2 Deming High School ‘A’ 47.06
1) Reyna, Fabian 2) Au, Esau
3) Villegas, Gabriel 4) Ramirez, Cesar

Event 3 Girls 800 Meter Run
1 Battle, Ellary Alamogordo H 2:21.29
2 Najar, Vanesa Alamogordo H 2:34.68
3 Shaklee, Janae Alamogordo H 2:36.59
4 Soe, Saung Alamogordo H 2:44.41
5 Armendariz, Lauren Silver High 2:52.79
6 Romero, Miranda Las Cruces H 2:56.13
7 Guzman, Valerie Centennial H 3:01.76
8 Santistevan, Kathleen Deming High 3:04.98
9 Marjmelejo, Valeria Las Cruces H 3:09.87
10 Cardoza, Clorinda Centennial H 3:17.19
11 Trujillo, Arianna Centennial H 3:27.39

Event 4 Boys 800 Meter Run
1 Garcia, Celso Alamogordo H 2:05.81
2 Aguilar, Daniel Deming High 2:11.42
3 Enriquez, Omar Alamogordo H 2:13.86
4 Dalmas, Isaiah Alamogordo H 2:18.30
5 Bernal, Eric Las Cruces H 2:19.95
6 Lara, Aaron Centennial H 2:22.28
7 Ball, Evan Centennial H 2:34.82
8 Hibpshman, Jared Alamogordo H 2:43.90
9 Leuenberger, Jonathan Centennial H 3:21.24

Event 5 Girls 100 Meter Hurdles
1 Duchene, Kaelan Alamogordo H 16.60 2
2 Bates, Trezure Alamogordo H 18.09 2
3 Riordan, Anna Alamogordo H 18.19 2
4 Leal, Ayanna Centennial H 18.26 2
5 Handley, Billie Las Cruces H 20.27 1
6 Contreras, Nikki Las Cruces H 20.56 1
7 Castillo, Juliana Alamogordo H 21.90 1

Event 6 Boys 110 Meter Hurdles
1 Sell, Zack Alamogordo H 16.69
2 Kotter, Gabe Alamogordo H 16.84
3 Mcrae, Crystan Las Cruces H 17.17
4 Hernandez, Daniel Centennial H 18.19
5 Mitchell, Aiden Centennial H 19.59
6 Sell, Matthew Alamogordo H 19.70
7 Madrid, Diego Silver High 19.92

Event 7 Girls 100 Meter Dash
1 Martin, Justyse Alamogordo H 12.69 2
2 Alexander, Leih’Asiyah Silver High 13.78 2
3 Thomas, Sydney Alamogordo H 13.83 2
4 Adams, Rebecca Alamogordo H 13.93 2
5 Barrio, Audrey Centennial H 14.34 2
6 Navarette, Janessa Centennial H 14.45 1
7 Woffard, Isabella Las Cruces H 14.52 1
8 Misquez, Kaley Silver High 14.83 1
9 Walker, Arriana Alamogordo H 14.87 1
10 Ocampo, Lauren Centennial H 15.28 2
11 Reinhold, Delia Las Cruces H 15.75 1
12 Sedor, Khrystal Centennial H 16.11 1
13 Rojas, Alyssa Las Cruces H 19.82 1

Event 8 Boys 100 Meter Dash
1 Johnson, Derrik Las Cruces H 11.47 3
2 Gilbert, Harlon Alamogordo H 11.53 3
3 Reyna, Fabian Deming High 11.81 3
4 Baeza, Isaac Deming High 12.11 1
5 Parra, Jose Silver High 12.21 3
6 Chacon, Josiah Silver High 12.37 1
7 Madrid, Richie Las Cruces H 12.41 2
8 Abeyta, Isaiah Centennial H 12.44 2
9 Mediola, Napu Alamogordo H 12.50 3
10 Ocoha, Jesus Alamogordo H 12.62 1
11 Vasquez, Ricky Silver High 12.66 2
12 Bitar, Juan Centennial H 12.68 2
13 Ortega, Israel Tularosa Hig 12.70 3
13 Moser, Landon Alamogordo H 12.70 3
15 Villegas, Gabriel Deming High 12.84 2
16 Rios, Joshua Silver High 13.07 1
17 Gibson, Whitney Centennial H 13.69 2
18 Fort, Craig Centennial H 14.07 2

Event 9 Girls 1600 Meter Run
1 Battle, Ellary Alamogordo H 5:37.37
2 Green, Lindsey Silver High 5:49.09
3 Shaklee, Janae Alamogordo H 5:57.92
4 Hoyle, Deianira Centennial H 6:05.25
5 Santistevan, Kathleen Deming High 7:33.56

Event 10 Boys 1600 Meter Run
1 Garcia, Celso Alamogordo H 4:41.13
2 Rogers, Colton Silver High 4:55.34
3 Rios, Dax Centennial H 5:00.11
4 Avila, Angel Alamogordo H 5:11.95
5 Gagnon, Michael Alamogordo H 5:17.37
6 Hallbeck, Jack Alamogordo H 5:35.68
7 Ball, Evan Centennial H 5:45.60
8 Lara, Aaron Centennial H 5:50.40

Event 11 Girls 4×200 Meter Relay
1 Alamogordo High School ‘A’ 1:50.76
1) Duchene, Kaelan 2) Sandoval, Gabi
3) Shaw, Haley 4) Thomas, Sydney
2 Las Cruces High School ‘A’ 1:59.63
1) Cylear, Katrina 2) Noopila, Maija
3) Reinhold, Delia 4) Sneed, Madison

Event 12 Boys 4×200 Meter Relay
1 Alamogordo High School ‘A’ 1:36.34
1) Moser, Landon 2) Sell, Zack
3) Dalmas, Isaiah 4) Mediola, Napu
2 Deming High School ‘A’ 1:41.95
1) Villegas, Gabriel 2) Hofacket, Charlie
3) Baeza, Isaac 4) Ramirez, Cesar
3 Centennial High School ‘A’ 1:43.55
1) Bitar, Oscar 2) Lundien, Deven
3) Lara, Nathan 4) Mayers, Julian

Event 13 Girls 400 Meter Dash
1 Barrera, Isabella Las Cruces H 1:02.12 2
2 Reinhold, Alegra Las Cruces H 1:02.29 2
3 Walker, Gracie Alamogordo H 1:04.32 2
4 Neilson, Michaela Alamogordo H 1:04.42 2
5 Gunn, Devyn Centennial H 1:04.91 2
6 Gerou, Eva Alamogordo H 1:06.22 2
7 Esquero, Alyssa Alamogordo H 1:09.37 2
8 Navarette, Janessa Centennial H 1:11.20 1
9 Armendariz, Lauren Silver High 1:11.24 1
10 Miller, Zia Las Cruces H 1:13.25 1
11 Goff, Sailer Tularosa Hig 1:15.92 1
12 Amador, Catrianna Centennial H 1:22.12 1
13 Skinner, Hannah Silver High 1:27.40 1

Event 14 Boys 400 Meter Dash
1 Barraza, Ezequiel Alamogordo H 53.29 3
2 Au, Esau Deming High 53.75 3
3 Kepfer, Aiden Alamogordo H 54.51 2
4 Enriquez, Omar Alamogordo H 54.64 3
5 Reyna, Fabian Deming High 55.04 3
6 Fort, Craig Centennial H 55.21 2
7 Aguilar, Daniel Deming High 55.51 3
8 Bernal, Ivan Alamogordo H 55.92 2
9 Reyes, Isaiah Tularosa Hig 56.93 1
10 Ortega, Israel Tularosa Hig 57.13 3
11 Barraza, Matthew Tularosa Hig 57.67 1
12 Bryant, Ricky Tularosa Hig 58.26 2
13 Weir, Levi Las Cruces H 58.99 1
14 Ortiz, Christian Centennial H 59.26 2
15 Herrera, Marcus Centennial H 59.46 1
16 Sedor, Paul Centennial H 1:02.24 3

Event 15 Girls 300 Meter Hurdles
1 Duchene, Kaelan Alamogordo H 47.85 2
2 Sandoval, Gabi Alamogordo H 52.69 2
3 Castillo, Evelyn Alamogordo H 55.57 2
4 Harrison, Syella Centennial H 56.35 2
5 Leal, Ayanna Centennial H 57.43 2
6 Handley, Billie Las Cruces H 59.28 1
7 Woffard, Isabella Las Cruces H 1:03.26 1
8 Fillmore, Marie Alamogordo H 1:04.83 1

Event 16 Boys 300 Meter Hurdles
1 Kotter, Gabe Alamogordo H 42.14 2
2 Mcrae, Crystan Las Cruces H 43.61 2
3 Sell, Zack Alamogordo H 44.20 2
4 Mitchell, Aiden Centennial H 46.39 2
5 Baeza, Isaac Deming High 46.55 2
6 Hernandez, Daniel Centennial H 47.01 2
7 Sifuentes, JonHenry Alamogordo H 48.89 1
8 Sell, Matthew Alamogordo H 48.91 1
9 Madrid, Diego Silver High 50.79 1

Event 17 Girls 1600 Sprint Medley
1 Las Cruces High School ‘A’ 4:46.28
1) Reinhold, Alegra 2) Gutierrez, Linette
3) Romero, Miranda 4)
2 Alamogordo High School ‘A’ 4:49.34
1) Riordan, Anna 2) Esquero, Alyssa
3) Koehler, Lynley 4) Soe, Saung

Event 18 Boys 1600 Sprint Medley
1 Las Cruces High School ‘A’ 3:49.03
1) Madrid, Richie 2) Lucero, Nicolas
3) Saiz, Zack 4) Hadley, Thomas
2 Alamogordo High School ‘A’ 4:05.92
1) Dalmas, Isaiah 2) Enriquez, Omar
3) Holt, Wyatt 4) Bond, Thomas

Event 19 Girls 200 Meter Dash
1 Martin, Justyse Alamogordo H 26.03 3
2 Stinson, Yvonne Alamogordo H 26.12 3
3 Gunn, Devyn Centennial H 27.95 3
4 Walker, Gracie Alamogordo H 28.47 3
5 Alexander, Leih’Asiyah Silver High 28.60 3
6 Barrio, Audrey Centennial H 29.28 3
7 Ocampo, Lauren Centennial H 29.37 2
8 Misquez, Kaley Silver High 31.27 2
9 Duran, Hailey Tularosa Hig 31.41 2
10 Reinhold, Delia Las Cruces H 32.86 2
11 Goff, Sailer Tularosa Hig 33.59 2
12 Sedor, Khrystal Centennial H 34.68 1
13 Wooldridge, Emily Alamogordo H 35.41 1
14 Rojas, Alyssa Las Cruces H 41.13 1

Event 20 Boys 200 Meter Dash
1 Gilbert, Harlon Alamogordo H 22.76 4
2 Johnson, Derrik Las Cruces H 24.01 4
3 Reyna, Fabian Deming High 24.14 4
4 Abeyta, Isaiah Centennial H 25.01 1
5 Mediola, Napu Alamogordo H 25.24 4
6 Aguilar, Daniel Deming High 25.30 4
7 Parra, Jose Silver High 25.33 4
8 Villegas, Gabriel Deming High 25.79 3
9 Spencer, Klevon Alamogordo H 25.85 3
10 Chacon, Josiah Silver High 25.97 3
11 Diaz, Joe Silver High 26.41 3
12 Pierce, Mason Centennial H 26.47 1
13 Weir, Levi Las Cruces H 26.85 2
14 Rios, Joshua Silver High 28.31 2
15 Pollock, Chris Alamogordo H 29.79 1

Event 21 Girls 3200 Meter Run
1 Najar, Vanesa Alamogordo H 12:52.06
2 Santistevan, Kathleen Deming High 16:31.29

Event 22 Boys 3200 Meter Run
1 Rogers, Colton Silver High 10:44.12
2 Rios, Dax Centennial H 10:53.93
3 Winder, Ben Las Cruces H 10:55.89
4 Krizek, Matthew Las Cruces H 10:57.41
5 Avila, Angel Alamogordo H 11:58.69
6 Hallbeck, Jack Alamogordo H 12:16.45

7 Ball, Evan Centennial H 13:27.50

Event 23 Girls 4×400 Meter Relay
1 Alamogordo High School ‘A’ 4:11.38
1) Adams, Rebecca 2) Stinson, Yvonne
3) Neilson, Michaela 4) Martin, Justyse
2 Centennial High School ‘A’ 4:37.26
1) Gunn, Devyn 2) Barrio, Audrey
3) Harrison, Syella 4) Hoyle, Deianira
3 Las Cruces High School ‘A’ 4:51.06

Event 24 Boys 4×400 Meter Relay
1 Alamogordo High School ‘A’ 3:30.86
1) Barraza, Ezequiel 2) Gilbert, Harlon
3) Kepfer, Aiden 4) Kotter, Gabe
2 Centennial High School ‘A’ 3:49.27
1) Fort, Craig 2) Sedor, Paul
3) Abeyta, Isaiah 4) Ortiz, Christian

Event 25 Girls Long Jump
1 Stinson, Yvonne Alamogordo H 16-02.00
2 Barrera, Isabella Las Cruces H 15-11.00
3 Duchene, Kaelan Alamogordo H 15-04.25
4 McCain, Jordan Silver High 14-02.75
5 Walker, Gracie Alamogordo H 13-10.50
5 Duran, Hailey Tularosa Hig 13-10.50
7 Barrio, Audrey Centennial H 13-02.50
8 Skinner, Hannah Silver High 11-04.00
9 Goff, Sailer Tularosa Hig 10-11.50

Event 26 Boys Long Jump
1 Moser, Landon Alamogordo H 19-05.00
2 Abeyta, Isaiah Centennial H 19-01.25
3 Ortega, Israel Tularosa Hig 18-05.25
4 Reyes, Isaiah Tularosa Hig 17-10.50
5 Hernandez, Daniel Centennial H 17-07.50
6 Mediola, Napu Alamogordo H 17-04.25
7 Bernal, Ivan Alamogordo H 16-11.50
8 Baeza, Isaac Deming High 16-08.50
9 Barraza, Matthew Tularosa Hig 16-07.00
10 Parra, Jose Silver High 16-06.50
11 Ocoha, Jesus Alamogordo H 16-03.00
12 Chacon, Josiah Silver High 16-02.00
13 Vasquez, Ricky Silver High 16-00.00
14 Madrid, Diego Silver High 15-06.00
15 Hofacket, Charlie Deming High 14-11.25
16 Bitar, Oscar Centennial H 13-06.75

Event 27 Girls Triple Jump
1 Esquero, Alyssa Alamogordo H 33-10.00
2 Harrison, Syella Centennial H 30-10.50
3 Riordan, Anna Alamogordo H 29-09.00
4 Koehler, Lynley Alamogordo H 29-05.25
5 Neilson, Michaela Alamogordo H 28-09.50

Event 28 Boys Triple Jump
1 Gilbert, Harlon Alamogordo H 42-09.50
2 Garcia, Celso Alamogordo H 38-00.00
3 Herrera, Marcus Centennial H 34-04.25
4 Holt, Wyatt Alamogordo H 34-04.00
5 Lara, Nathan Centennial H 33-02.00
6 Umphress, Jonathan Centennial H 32-01.00
7 Hofacket, Charlie Deming High 31-07.00

Event 29 Girls High Jump
1 Stinson, Yvonne Alamogordo H 4-10.00
2 Castillo, Evelyn Alamogordo H 4-08.00
3 Navarette, Janessa Centennial H 4-04.00
3 Soe, Saung Alamogordo H 4-04.00
3 Amador, Catrianna Centennial H 4-04.00
3 Duran, Hailey Tularosa Hig 4-04.00

Event 30 Boys High Jump
1 Sell, Zack Alamogordo H 5-10.00
2 Kotter, Gabe Alamogordo H 5-08.00
3 Spencer, Klevon Alamogordo H J5-08.00
4 Ramirez, Cesar Deming High J5-08.00
5 Hofacket, Charlie Deming High 5-02.00

Event 31 Girls Pole Vault
1 Gerou, Eva Alamogordo H 8-09.00
2 Contreras, Nikki Las Cruces H 8-03.00
3 Bates, Trezure Alamogordo H 6-09.00
4 Moore, Victoria Centennial H 5-09.00

Event 32 Boys Pole Vault
1 Whitelock, Paul Centennial H 10-09.00
2 Hamilton, Chris Las Cruces H 10-03.00
3 Marquez, Joey Alamogordo H 9-09.00

Event 33 Girls Discus Throw
1 Marquez, Macy Alamogordo H 118-01
2 Ocampo, Lauren Centennial H 113-08
3 Leal, Ayanna Centennial H 93-04
4 Pili, Aveolela Centennial H 87-10
5 Salas, Alexys Silver High 82-11
6 Gaston, Layla Tularosa Hig 82-05
7 Vela, Prisila Las Cruces H 78-03
8 Baca, Victoria Deming High 73-04
9 Flourney, Liz Deming High 67-11
10 Salopek, Shaylie Las Cruces H 62-08
11 Pattinson, Maliah Alamogordo H 58-03
12 Kennedy, Kayelee Alamogordo H 54-04

Event 34 Boys Discus Throw
1 Gunn, Jayden Centennial H 141-11
2 LoCoco, Kaden Alamogordo H 137-10
3 Kennedy, Christian Alamogordo H 130-05
4 Ortiz, Ian Deming High 116-09
5 Coyazo, Daniel Alamogordo H 109-07
6 RamIrez, Marcos Deming High 101-00
7 Coyazo, Aiden Alamogordo H 93-01
8 Lewis, Dominic Centennial H 92-10
9 Ortiz, Brandon Silver High 91-00
10 Washam, Dalton Centennial H 83-09
11 Fresquez, Joshua Centennial H 78-10
12 Ellis, Alexander Silver High 73-04
13 Begay, Dace Silver High 66-11

Event 35 Girls Javelin Throw
1 Ocampo, Lauren Centennial H 121-08
2 Lessentine, Sierra Alamogordo H 109-01
3 Torres, Ariana Alamogordo H 102-04
4 Pili, Aveolela Centennial H 99-05
5 Martinez, Makayla Silver High 94-08
6 Sneed, Madison Las Cruces H 80-00
7 Lina, Jayden Las Cruces H 78-02
8 Gaston, Layla Tularosa Hig 74-02
9 Skinner, Hannah Silver High 66-08
10 Flourney, Liz Deming High 62-06
11 Baca, Victoria Deming High 58-07

Event 36 Boys Javelin Throw
1 Bowen, Jimmy Alamogordo H 142-06
2 Ortiz, Ian Deming High 120-00
3 Anthony, Connor Alamogordo H 98-07
4 Cruz, Joaquin Alamogordo H 96-10
5 Fresquez, Joshua Centennial H 94-00
6 RamIrez, Marcos Deming High 92-03
7 Washam, Dalton Centennial H 86-05

Event 37 Girls Shot Put
1 Pili, Aveolela Centennial H 35-03.00
2 Marquez, Macy Alamogordo H 30-10.00
3 Salas, Alexys Silver High 29-07.00
4 Vela, Prisila Las Cruces H 28-05.00
5 Baca, Victoria Deming High 27-01.00
6 Flourney, Liz Deming High 25-11.00
7 Parraz, Teresa Las Cruces H 23-06.00
8 Pattinson, Maliah Alamogordo H 19-01.00

Event 38 Boys Shot Put
1 LoCoco, Kaden Alamogordo H 45-02.00
2 Gunn, Jayden Centennial H 44-02.00
3 Cruz, Joaquin Alamogordo H 40-08.00
4 Kennedy, Christian Alamogordo H 39-01.00
5 Ortiz, Ian Deming High 38-06.00
6 Coyazo, Daniel Alamogordo H 37-00.00
7 Lewis, Dominic Centennial H 36-06.00
8 Ellis, Alexander Silver High 35-03.00
9 Ortiz, Brandon Silver High 33-00.00
10 Washam, Dalton Centennial H 32-11.00
11 Fresquez, Joshua Centennial H 32-07.00
12 Ramirez, Marcos Deming High 29-07.00
13 Begay, Dace Silver High 29-04.00
14 Bennett, Anthony Deming High 27-00.00


Congratulations to all the student athletes from all 6 schools that participated in this odd post Covid-19 Season. Next week the Alamogordo boys will compete at the Gadsden Meet on Friday, Tularosa will compete at District 3-2A Meet at Cloudcroft next Friday.

STAY CONNECTED! SUBSCRIBE TO FREE EMAIL UPDATES FROM 2ND LIFE MEDIA ALAMOGORDO

SIGN UP!  I’m interested

Replies

New Mexico History & Politics- 1910 to 2020: On the back Soledad C. Chacón climbs the New Mexico Round House and the Congressional Delegation of Rep. Deb Haaland, Yvette Herrell and Teresa Leger Fernandez

On the back Soledad C. Chacón climbs the New Mexico Round House and the Congressional Delegation of Rep. Deb Haaland, Yvette Herrell and Teresa Leger Fernandez

Was 2014 the flashpoint for women in executive leadership and politics for the state of New Mexico? A lot of dialog has been created about the number women in politics in New Mexico of recent but not much has been published about the pathway that led to the success of women in power. There are a few key leaders, key organizations and the path fell on the backbone or foundation of some strong and determined women to get New Mexico to where it is now. Not only is it a leader in the number of women in political power it is also the national leader of women of color in political power. Let us look at a little insight into the history of what created the pathway to female equity in New Mexico political leadership.

The history of women impacting New Mexico politics begins in excess of 100 years ago…

New Mexico during its founding had been among the more politically conservative states in the West when it came to women’s suffrage, refusing to extend women the right to vote until after the passage of the 19th Amendment. The fight for women’s suffrage in New Mexico was incremental and had the support of both Hispanic and Anglo women suffragists. When New Mexico was a territory, women only had the right to vote in school board elections. Women under the Republic of Mexico in the land that became New Mexico had more rights than women in the United States did at the time. During the time that New Mexico was a territory of the United States, women were allowed to vote in school board elections.

The New Mexico State Constitutional Convention of 1910…

In 1910, New Mexico was eligible to become a state and a state constitutional convention was held. Just before the convening of the convention, the New Mexico Women’s Christian Temperance Union (WCTU) held a public debate on women’s suffrage. This debate took place in August in Mountainair, New Mexico and featured the president of the University of New Mexico and a socialist.

Most delegates to the convention did not women participating in politics. Nevertheless, during the convention which began on October 3, librarian, Julia Duncan Brown Asplund, attended each day and petitioned delegates to provide partial suffrage for women in the right to vote in school elections Delegate Solomon Luna, uncle of prominent New Mexican suffragist, Nina Otero-Warren, and H.O Bursum were both pro-suffrage.

Delegate Reuben Heflin, a Democrat from Farmington introduced the school election provision early on during the convention. On November 8, the convention’s Committee on Elective Franchise sponsored a “motion to strike out the limited franchise for women.” Two of the delegates were very opposed to women voting even in school elections were Delegates Dougherty and Sena. Dougherty stated that he didn’t believe women in New Mexico wanted to vote and Sena claimed that voting would lead to harm for women.

After this, the Woman’s Club of Albuquerque presented a petition for partial suffrage to the convention through Delegate Stover. The provision to allow women to vote did pass and was adopted in the final draft of the constitution which was passed on November 21. However, the constitution was also written in such a way that adding other voting rights would be difficult. The constitution required that three-fourths of all voters in each county in New Mexico would have to approve any changes to suffrage in the state.

When New Mexico created its state constitution in 1910, it continued to allow women to vote only in school elections. Upon creation of the state constitution, it was deemed impossible to modify the constitution to extend the voting rights of women any further.

Women in the suffrage fight in the state of New Mexico chose to pursue advocating for a federal women’s suffrage amendment. They organized among both English and Spanish speaking groups from the Alfred M. Bergere House which is on the National Register of Historic Places. That house was the flashpoint and the origin of the suffrage movement in New Mexico. The home originally built in the early 1870s on the Fort Marcy Military Reservation became the home of the Otero Bergere family, including Adelina (Nina) Otero Warren, a noted suffragist, author, and businesswoman. Her suffrage work in New Mexico caught the attention of suffrage leader Alice Paul, who tapped Nina in 1917 to head the New Mexico chapter of the Congressional Union (precursor to the National Woman’s Party). Nina insisted that suffrage literature be published in both English and Spanish, in order to reach the widest audience. Under their leadership in galvanizing women of color to unite with Caucasian women pressure then was put on the many male New Mexico politicians who then were forced to support suffrage on a federal level. Continued advocacy on behalf of suffragists in the state allowed New Mexico to become the 32nd state to ratify the Nineteenth Amendment on February 21, 1920.

The Nations First Female Statewide Office Holder A New Mexican and a Woman of Color…

In 1922, two years after the 19th Amendment guaranteed women the right to vote, the people of New Mexico elected Soledad Chávez de Chacón (August 10, 1890–August 4, 1936) as the first woman elected to be the Secretary of State of New Mexico, and the first Hispanic woman elected to statewide office in the United States.

She served as acting Governor of New Mexico for two weeks in 1924, becoming the second woman to act as chief executive of a U.S. state.

The Growth Curve and Roadblock to Women In Politics…

The trend of women in political power continued to grow in New Mexico. The trends favored a growth of women in political office nationwide. In New Mexico and nationally the proportion of women among statewide elective officials had grown substantially during the 1960s to 1971. From 1971 to 1983 the increases were small and incremental. Then, between 1983 and 2000, a period of significant growth, the number and proportion of women serving statewide almost tripled, reaching a record of 92 women, constituting 28.5 percent of all statewide elected officials, in 2000. Since 2000, the numbers and proportions dropped notably. As a result, dialog began on what to do to help train and groom women for leadership and into political office.

The decline in women statewide elected officials continued following the 2010 elections. Despite the election of three new women governors, the number of women serving in statewide elective offices nationwide actually decreased by two, and fewer women, 69 held statewide offices in 2011 than in 1995 when there were 84 women.

A review of the 2010 election results in 2011 showed some major issues of concern, women held 21.8 percent of the 317 statewide elective positions nationwide. In addition to the six women governors, 11 women (four Democrat, seven Republican) served as lieutenant governors in the 44 states that elect lieutenant governors in statewide elections. This was considerably fewer than the record number of 19 women who served as lieutenant governors in 1995.

Other women statewide elected officials included: 11 secretaries of state (eight Democrats, three Republicans), seven state auditors (five Democrats, two Republicans), six state treasurers (five Democrats, one Republican), seven attorneys general (five Democrats, two Republicans), five chief education officials (two Democrats, two Republicans, one nonpartisan), four public service commissioners (three Democrats, one Republican), four state comptroller/controllers (one Democrat, three Republicans), two commissioners of insurance (one Democrat, one Republican), three corporation commissioners (one Democrat, two Republicans), one commissioner of labor (Republican), one railroad commissioner (Republican), and one public regulatory commissioner (Democrat).

In addition to the two women of color who served as governors, the women serving in statewide elective office included four African-Americans (the lieutenant governor of Florida, the attorney general of California (Kamala Harris), the state treasurer of Connecticut and the corporation commissioner of Arizona); three Latinas (the secretary of state of New Mexico, the attorney general of Nevada and the superintendent of public instruction for Oregon); and one Native American (the public regulatory commissioner of New Mexico).

The decreases of women in politics became and alarming trend not only in the US but south of the border in the country of Mexico as well. However, they took an interesting approach and made it the law of the land to engage more women into leadership…

The country of Mexico approved a political reform package that, among other things, included new measures aimed to ensure the greater participation of women in politics in 2014. The law now requires gender parity, which means that at least fifty percent of the candidates fielded by a political party in either federal or state legislative elections must be female.

Mexico had a history of encouraging the participation of women in politics and has impressive rates of participation in the federal Congress. Women in 2014 accounted for 38% of the legislators in Mexico’s lower house and 35% of the senators, rates in line with the Nordic countries (in 2014 the US, 18% of the seats in the House of Representatives and 20% of the Senate seats are filled by women). Mexico’s high rate of female participation is due in large part to previous affirmative action policies, which included several loopholes that the new law closes. Formerly, in order to comply with established quotas, women who were put on the ballot were later encouraged to cede their place to a male listed as a reserve replacement (oftentimes their husband) –the political party’s preference in the first place. Furthermore, women were included on the list to be assigned by their party under proportional representation but were so far down in the pecking order that they were rarely tapped to serve.

The new reform increased the quota requirement for candidates to 50%, with more stringent rules related to how the quota is implemented. Now, for example, the candidate and her replacement will have to be female.

Demographics favor women and most especially women of color in New Mexico…

The state of New Mexico took notice of what was happening in the country south of her border and of the trends within the United State. It was determined demographics actually work in the favor of women in key states such as New Mexico. As such women especially the Democratic leadership reviewed options in keys states such as New Mexico.

New Mexico’s population is a majority Latino or Hispanic and an additional 11 percent American Indian or Alaska Native, making it one of the few states, in which most of its residents, are non-white. The Latino population has grown over the past few decades, meaning a Chicanx or Latina candidates share a similar ethnic background now with a majority of the population.

The percentage of racial and ethnic minorities — people who identify as Hispanic, black, Asian, or “other” — in New Mexico eclipsed the percentage of white residents’ way back in 1994. California, New Mexico, and Texas were not far behind.

And by the year 2060, a total of 22 states are projected to have what demographers call, somewhat oxymoronically, “majority-minority” populations.

Four states — Arizona, Florida, Georgia, and New Jersey — are set to tip in the 2020s. In the 2030s, Alaska, Louisiana, and New York will follow. Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, Mississippi, Oklahoma, and Virginia will obtain race-ethnic majority-minority status in 2040s. And Colorado, North Carolina, and Washington are on track to make it in the 2050s.

New Mexico as one of the first majority-minority states is the trendsetter into the future of politics…

New Mexico politics has also become increasingly dominated by Democrats, which may have helped some women of color, as women of color are disproportionately likely to run — and win — on the Democratic side of the ticket. But recruiting women of color has also become a higher priority for groups that aim to propel more women into elected office, like Emerge, a national Democratic organization that opened an office in New Mexico in 2005. Emerge New Mexico, claims that over the past 14 years, 350 women have gone through their six-month training program. Of those, over half have run for office and over half of the program members are also women of color. 98 Emerge New Mexico Alumnae are actively in Public Office per their 2020 data on their website to include…

U.S. Cabinet Secretary

Deb HaalandU.S. Secretary of the Interior, ENM ’07;

New Mexico Statewide Office

Commissioner Stephanie Garcia Richard Commissioner of Public Lands, ENM ’08; Chair Marg Elliston Chair of the Democratic Party of New Mexico, ENM ’13

New Mexico Supreme Court

Justice Barbara VigilNew Mexico Supreme Court Justice, ENM ’12Justice Julie VargasNew Mexico Supreme Court Justice, Statewide, ENM ’14Justice Shannon Bacon New Mexico Supreme Court Justice, ENM Founding Board Member

New Mexico Court of Appeals

Judge Jennifer Attrep New Mexico Court of Appeals, Statewide, ENM ’15: Judge Kristina Bogardus New Mexico Court of Appeals, Statewide, ENM ’17Judge Megan Duffy Mexico Court of Appeals, Statewide, ENM ’18; Judge Shammara Henderson New Mexico Court of Appeals, Statewide, ENM ’10Judge Jacqueline Medina New Mexico Court of Appeals, Statewide, ENM ’14Judge Jane Yohalem New Mexico Court of Appeals, Statewide, ENM ’18

State Senate

Senator Shannon Pinto Senate District 3, Tohatchi, ENM ’20;
Senator Katy Duhigg Senate District 10, Albuquerque, ENM ’11; Senator Siah Correa Hemphill Senate District 28, Albuquerque, ENM ’19Senator Carrie Hamblen Senate District 38, Albuquerque, ENM ’15

State House

Rep. D. Wonda Johnson House District 5, Gallup, ENM ’14; Rep. Patricia Roybal Caballero House District 13, Albuquerque, ENM ’07; Rep. Dayan “Day” Hochman-Vigil House District 15, Albuquerque, ENM ’18; Rep. Debbie Armstrong House District 17, Albuquerque, ENM ’12; Rep. Meredith Dixon House District 20, Albuquerque, ENM ’20; Rep. Debbie Sariñana House District 21, Albuquerque, ENM ’16; Rep. Liz Thomson House District 24, Albuquerque, ENM ’09; Rep. Georgene Louis House District 26, Albuquerque, ENM ’10; Rep. Marian Matthews House District 27, Albuquerque, ENM Bootcamp ’19; Rep. Melanie Stansbury House District 28, Albuquerque, ENM ’17; Rep. Joy Garratt House District 29, Albuquerque, ENM ’16; Rep. Natalie Figueroa, House District 30, Albuquerque, ENM ’16; Rep. Angelica Rubio House District 35, Las Cruces, ENM ’13; Rep. Joanne Ferrary House District 37, Las Cruces, ENM ’13; Rep. Kristina Ortez House District 42, Las Cruces, ENM ’20; Rep. Christine Chandler House District 43, Los Alamos, ENM Bootcamp ’18; Rep. Linda Serrato House District 45, Las Cruces, ENM ’18; Rep. Andrea Romero House District 46, Santa Fe, ENM ’18; Rep. Tara Lujan House District 48, Santa Fe, ENM ’12; Rep. Karen Bash House District 68, Albuquerque, ENM ’18

Judges

Judge Maria Sanchez-Gagne 1st Judicial District, Div II, ENM ’16; Judge Shannon Broderick Bulman 1st Judicial District, Div III, ENM ’19; Judge Sylvia Lamar 1st Judicial District, Div IV, ENM ’15; Judge Kathleen McGarry Ellenwood 1st Judicial District, Div X, ENM ’20; Judge Catherine Begaye 2nd Judicial District, Children’s Court, ENM ’14; Judge Beatrice Brickhouse 2nd Judicial District, Div IV, ENM ’10 Judge Nancy Franchini 2nd Judicial District, Div V, ENM ’14; Judge Lisa Chavez Ortega 2nd Judicial District, Div XIII, ENM Bootcamp ’19; Judge Marie Ward 2nd Judicial District, Div XIV, ENM ’06 Judge Erin O’Connell 2nd Judicial District, Div XVII, ENM ’19; Judge Amber Chavez Baker 2nd Judicial District, Div XXII, ENM Bootcamp ’19; Judge Debra Ramirez 2nd Judicial District, Div XXIV, ENM ’15; Judge Jane Levy 2nd Judicial District, Div XXV, ENM ’17; Judge Clara Moran 2nd Judicial District, Div XXVIII, ENM ’16; udge Melissa Kennelly 8th Judicial District, Div IX, ENM Bootcamp ’19; Judge Amanda Sanchez Villalobos 13th Judicial District, Div IX, ENM Bootcamp ’19; Judge Rosemary Cosgrove Aguilar Metropolitan Court, Bernalillo County, ENM ’08; Judge Brittany Maldonado Malott Metropolitan Court, Bernalillo County, ENM ’19; Judge Courtney Weaks Metropolitan Court, Bernalillo County, ENM ’13; Judge Elizabeth Allen Municipal Judge, District 32, ENM Bootcamp ’18; Judge Cristy Carbón-Gaul Probate Court Judge, Bernalillo County, ENM Founding Board Member

Municipal

Councilor Diane Gibson Albuquerque City Councilor, District 7, ENM ’11, Councilor Tessa Abeyta-Stuve Las Cruces City Councilor, District 2, ENM ’18; Councilor Johana Bencomo Las Cruces City Councilor, District 4, ENM ’18; Councilor Renee Villarreal Santa Fe County Councilor, ENM ’18; Councilor Guadalupe Cano Silver City Town Councilor, ENM ’11

County

Assessor Tanya Giddings Bernalillo County Assessor, ENM ’14; Assessor Linda Gallegos Sandoval County Assessor, ENM Bootcamp ’18; Clerk Linda Stover Bernalillo County Clerk, ENM Bootcamp ’19; Clerk Amanda López Askin Doña Ana County Clerk, ENM ’19; Clerk Katharine Clark Santa Fe County Clerk, ENM ’17; Clerk Naomi Maestas Los Alamos County Clerk, ENM ’20; Treasurer Nancy Bearce Bernalillo County Treasurer, ENM ’14; Treasurer Jennifer Manzanares Santa Fe County Treasurer, ENM ’19; Commissioner Charlene Pyskoty Bernalillo County Commission, District 5, ENM ’18; Commissioner Adriann Barboa Bernalillo County Commissioner, District 3, ENM ’17; Commissioner Diana Murillo-Trujillo Doña Ana County Commissioner, District 2, ENM ’15; Commissioner Alicia Edwards Grant County Commissioner, District 3, ENM ’15; Commissioner Sara Scott Alamos County Councilor, Position 1, ENM Bootcamp ’18; Commissioner Katherine Bruch Sandoval County Commissioner, ENM Bootcamp ’18; Commissioner Anna Hansen Santa Fe County Commissioner, District 2, ENM ’14; Commissioner Anna Hamilton Santa Fe County Commissioner, District 4, ENM ’16; Commissioner Anjanette Brush Taos County Commissioner, District 4, ENM ’19

New Mexico Public Regulation Commission

Commissioner Cynthia Hall PRC District 1, ENM ’15

New Mexico Public Education Commission

Commissioner Melissa Armijo PEC District 1, ENM ’19; Commissioner Glenna Voigt

PEC District 3, ENM ’18

New Mexico County/Municipal School Boards

Yolanda Cordova APS Board of Education, District 1, ENM ’18; Elizabeth Armijo APS Board of Education, District 6, ENM ’09; Nancy Baca CNM Governing Board, District 5, ENM ’10; Teresa Tenorio Las Cruces School Board, District 4, ENM ’18; Chris Bernstein Los Alamos School Board, District 3, ENM ’18; Mara Salcido Lovington School Board, District 3, ENM ’15; Hilda Sanchez Roswell School Board, District 4, ENM ’17; Jody Pugh Santa Fe Community College Board of Trustees, Position 3, ENM ’18; Carmen Gonzales Santa Fe Public Schools Board of Education, ENM ’18; Kate Noble Santa Fe Public Schools Board of Education, District 3, ENM ’17; M. Paulene Abeyta To’hajiilee School Board, ENM ’17

Democratic Party

Flora Lucero Bernalillo County Democratic Party, Chair, ENM ’19; Laura Childress Lincoln County Democratic Party, 1st Vice-Chair, ENM ’20; Leah Ahkee-Baczkiewcz Sandoval County Democratic Party, Vice-Chair, ENM ‘18

Middle Rio Grande Conservation District

Stephanie Russo Baca MRGCD Board Director, Position 5, ENM ‘19

Soil and Water Conservation District

Teresa Smith De Cherif Valencia Soil & Water Conservation District Board Supervisor, ENM ‘14

New Mexico Women by the Numbers after 2020…

Many women are now being elected as witnessed by this training of groups like Emerge and the training paid off in strong numbers in 2020. After the election of 2020, the real story in New Mexico is, it was the year of the woman and the year of the woman of color. Women made state history by winning most seats in the New Mexico State House of Representatives. Though still in the minority in the New Mexico Senate, women set a record in that chamber, too, with 12 seats. Out of 70 State Representatives, women now make up 37 of them on the house side, and of course the Governor is a woman.

New Mexico now ranks fourth in the nation for the ratio of women to men who will hold House chamber seats in January, said Jean Sinzdak, associate director of the Center for American Women and Politics at Rutgers University in New Jersey, per the Santa Fe New Mexican publication.

New Mexico continued to make its mark in political history by becoming the first state in history to elect an all-female delegation to the U.S. House of Representatives. It also made history as the first state in the continental US to elect all three members of this historic delegation as also women of color. Incumbent Rep. Deb Haaland, D-N.M., Yvette Herrell (Republican) and Teresa Leger Fernandez (Democrat) in New Mexico’s three congressional districts were the three women elected. (Note Deb Haaland has since been appointed to the US Secretary of the Interior as the first Native American to hold that title, her seat is now up for special election) The first U.S. state to have an all women of color House delegation was Hawaii in 1990, when Rep. Patsy Mink (D-Hawaii) and Rep. Pat Saiki (R-Hawaii) took office, however New Mexico is the first state to do so in the continental US.

Haaland is an enrolled citizen of the Pueblo of Laguna and made history in 2018 when she became one of the first Native American congresswomen. Herrell is a member of the Cherokee nation and former N.M. state representative. Leger-Fernandez is the first woman and Latina to ever represent northern New Mexico in U.S. Congress.

Our hope our future New Mexico…

Each of the proud and deserving women have a long difficult road ahead of them to represent a diverse population within New Mexico. Much has been said about the poor rankings of the state in academics, the reliance upon the oil industry to keep the state budget afloat and the many challenges with crime and poverty within the state. The men proceeding these women have not made it an easy job for them to step into. However, the editorial staff of the publication has the hope that each of these 3 elected women and the 98 others in the variety of offices showcased above will step up to the challenges ahead. Our hope is they will reach across the isle and put partisan ideology aside and work together as women with compassion and strength to craft policy that carries New Mexico forward into jobs creation for the 21st Century.

Each woman highlighted in this article is a woman of convictions and of talent to gain the position they have ascended to. Our hope is they will read this, remember the battles of suffrage fought by Julia Duncan Brown Asplund, Alice Paul, Nina Otero-Warren and others from 1910 that gained them the right to hold the office they are in today and the right to vote. Our hope is they will honor the memory of Soledad Chávez de Chacón by leading, not pandering to special interest and money like the men have for so many decades but by honestly leading and listening to the diversity of constituents to put them there.

Are you up to the challenge?

Rep. Deb Haaland and her ultimate successor, D-N.M., Yvette Herrell (Republican) and Teresa Leger Fernandez (Democrat) the baton was handed to you. Now are you listening? Will you reach across the diversity that is New Mexico and represent all of the diverse opinion’s ideas and constituencies? Will you step up and above the fray and show that women can lead differently and with more compassion than men? History will be judging you and we hope it will be a kind judgement in the years ahead!

Author Chris Edwards

Follow Executive Coach and Author, Chris Edwards via the Alamogordo Town News, 2nd Life Media or his Podcast, 2nd
Life Media Present. Published books by Author Chris Edwards include Coach Bob Sepulveda: The Early Days, 2 Hours Unplugged Unplug and Reconnect, 90 Days to a Glass Half Full Lifestyle, and has published essays on criminal justice reform Removing Barriers to State Occupational Licenses to Enhance Entrepreneurial Job Growth: Out of Prison, Out of Work.

Research for the story above sourced from:

Soledad Chávez Chacón: A New Mexico Political Pioneer. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Printing Services. Retrieved August 27, 2020, “Woman Wielding Power: Pioneer Female State, Legislators”. nwhm.org. National Woman’s History Museum. Retrieved 23 March 2015., “National Register of Historic Places Inventory/Nomination: Salvador Armijo House”. National Park Service. October 8, 1976., knowledgecenter.csg.org, Vox Media- Here’s when you can expect racial minorities to be the majority in each state, Five Thirty-Eight Why New Mexico Elects More Women of Color Than the Rest Of The Country, EMERGE, Ballotpedia, Wikipedia, NCLS.org, nmlegis.gov, AP News, MSN.com, US.gov

Alamogordo, New Mexico Sports History, Alamogordo History: Look Back Girls Track & Field Success 1977 District Win & Remembering Coach Lawrence E. Johnson

The year as 1977 and the Alamogordo Girls Track and Field Team continued to show the state they were a team to take serious as they captured the 3AAAA district crown as the top team in the district. The Tigers earned 134 points placing 1st with Mayfield at 122 points in 2nd place and Las Cruces in 3rd
place with 104 points. 

Ruthie Fatheree collected a total of 33 points to pace Alamogordo’s effort for a victory.

District Medalist included:

  • Ruthie Fatheree, 1st Place, 50 Yard Dash, 6.0
    • 1st
      Place, 220 Yard Dash, 26.9
    • 2nd
      Place, Long Jump, 17’ 3”
  • Vicki Lee, Susan Lee, Debbie Salcido, Fatheree, 1st Place, 440, 50.4
  • Susan Lee, Fatheree, Salcido and Donna Scroggins, 1st Place, 880, 1:48.3
  • Vicki Lee, 1st Place, 100 Yard Dash, 11.3
  • Carmen Smith, 1st Place, Shot Put
  • Ruth Turning, 2nd Place, High Jump, 4’ 10”
  • Vicki Lee, Susan Lee, Cathy Frederick, Karen Guerrero, 2nd Place, Mile Relay, 4:14.9
  • Debbie Salcido, 3rd Place, Soft Ball Throw, 183’ 3”
  • Kim Campbell, 3rd Place, 110 Low Hurdles, 15.8
    • 4th
      Place, High Jump 4’ 8”
    • 5th
      Place, 80 Yard Hurdles, 11.9 (state qualified time)
  • Cathy Frederick, 3rd Place, 440 Yard Dash, 63.0
  • Toni Irvine, 3rd Place, Shot Put 34’ 8”
  • Salcido, Scroggins, Cheryl Greer and Guerrero, 3rd Place, Medley Relay, 1:59.6
  • Susan Lee, 4th Place 100 Yard Dash, 11.8 (state qualified)
  • Karen Guerrero, 4th Place, 440 Yard Dash, 63.4
  • Delinder Compton, 4th Place, 440 Yard Dash, 65.4
  • Angela Holloway, 4th Place, Shot Put, 34’ 5”
  • Janet Haug, 6th Place, 440 Yard Dash 65.9
  • Lisa Busick, 6th Place, Mile Run, 6:14.0

Coming off the district meet 10 girls qualified for state in 11 events. Ruthie Fatheree led the team in 5 events at the state meet. Susan Lee and Vicki Lee also feel the team pressure as both are competing in 7 events.

Albuquerque Manzano wins top team honors in girls AAAA Track & Field for the 1977 season. Alamogordo  Girls placed 6th at the state meet. 

Medalist at the state meet included:

  • Vicki Lee, Susan Lee, Debbie Salcido, Fatheree, 2nd, Place 440 Relay, 50.30
  • Vicki Lee, 5th Place, 100 Yard Dash, 11.38
  • Ruthie Fatheree, 6th Place, 50 Yard Dash, 6.26
    • 4th
      Place, 220, 26.45
  • Carmen Smith, 2nd Place, Shot Put, 40.3
  • Susan Lee, Fatheree, Salcido and Donna Scroggins, 3rd Place, 880 Relay, 1:47.5
  • Kim Campbell, 4th Place, Long Jump, 16’ 2 ¼

The 1977 Athletics season seemed to be coalescing with the coaches working more closely together under a new football coach now in full force that being coach Gary Hveem. At Alamogordo High School in 1977 both the girl and boy student athletes began working closer together. 

Cross Country, Track & Field, Golf and Tennis had boys and girls training together and sharing coaching staffs. Girls Track under the leadership of Head Coach Marilyn Sepulveda was assisted by Kay Morgan and Joe Bryant and beginning to garner attention from around the state. In the years to come many great things would be seen based on this solid foundation of excellence.

Most athletic programs were growing at Alamogordo High in 1977, but the result of Title IX and expanded girls athletics, the decision was made to cut the wrestling program to ensure all other programs were funded appropriately and all students had the opportunity to compete.

The 1977 school year also saw the return of Lawrence Johnson from a former star athlete and student to a teacher and coach who assisted the boys and girls track programs. As outlined in book one in the series he had an amazing career at Alamogordo, became a guidance counselor who assisted hundreds of students and ultimately became the Athletic Director in future years.

Lawrence Johnson was born July 15, 1949 in Dallas, Texas, to Rubin Lee and Susie Mae Johnson. His nickname was Slick and was famous with his student athletes for his sunglasses. He graduated from Alamogordo High School in 1969. He was an athlete under Coach Sepulveda and others. He was a district track and field champion in broad jump.

He went to college at Western New Mexico University in Silver City where he earned his bachelor’s in 1972 and master’s degree in 1975.

“I graduated from high school here in Alamogordo in 1968 and went off to college, I came back in 1972 and I got a job,” Johnson said in a 2014 Daily News article about his retirement. “I started teaching physical education and social studies at the middle school and I just continued from there. I really enjoyed teaching the kids, I also enjoyed coaching. I started the learning process at that time and I really enjoyed myself.”

He served 42 years at Alamogordo as a coach, teacher, guidance counselor and athletic director.

In 1982, Johnson began working at Alamogordo High School as a track and boys basketball coach, which he did for five years after prior experience as the JV Basketball Coach and Coach at the Middle High. He aided Coach Sepulveda from the beginning of his tenure with the Alamogordo school systems and throughout his career.

He also served as a guidance counselor for six years. Johnson became the assistant athletic director at AHS in 1993, the following year he became the athletic director. Johnson served as athletic director at AHS for 21 years, the longest tenured Athletic director in the school’s history.

He served on the New Mexico High School Coaches Association Board of Directors. In addition, Johnson was a member of the New Mexico Athletic Directors Association, (NMADA) board for 20 years. From 1998 to 1999, New Mexico Athletic Directors Association (NMADA) board for 20 years. From 1998 to 1999, he was president of NMADA.

In 2017, Johnson was honored with the Distinguished Service award from the National Interscholastic Athletic Administrators Association (NIAAA). He was one of 11 educators nationwide to receive the award.

In 1972, Johnson began working at Alamogordo High School as a track and boys basketball coach, which he did for five years after prior experience as the JV Basketball Coach and Coach at the Middle High. He aided Coach Sepulveda from the beginning of his tenure with the Alamogordo school systems.

Alamogordo School Board members unanimously approved the renaming of the Tiger Pit sports complex at Alamogordo High School to honor Lawrence E. Johnson for his many years of contribution to the community and the thousands of students and athletes he positively affected as a mentor and role model. His legacy continues in that facility today…

https://2ndlifemediaalamogordo.town.news/g/alamogordo-nm/n/30819/alamogordo-sports-history-look-back-girls-track-field-success-1977-district

Excerpted from Coach Bob Sepulveda The Early Days a joint collaboration of Author Chris Edwards and Artist Rene Sepulveda, available at Roadrunner Emporium, 928 New York Avenue, Alamogordo, New Mexico and on Amazon in 36 countries. Soon to be released, Coach Bob Sepulveda The Golden Years 1977 to 1995 soon to be released on Amazon and fine independent bookstores everywhere. 

Who was the fastest man on earth, was responsible for the Murphy’s Law “whatever can go wrong will go wrong, and championed the seatbelt you wear daily?

A resident of Alamogordo, who worked at Alamogordo New Mexico’s Holloman Air Force Base, made history in the U.S. space program and history for travel at a speed faster than a .45-caliber bullet in an experiment to test the limits of human endurance.

That same Alamogordo resident was known as the “fastest man on Earth” during the research phase of the US space program to the moon. He accelerated in five seconds from a standstill to 632 m.p.h. The New York Herald Tribune called this Alamogordo resident “a gentleman who can stop on a dime and give you 10 cents change.”

He won what will perhaps be even more lasting fame in a test five years earlier, when he suffered injuries owing to a mistake by a US Airforce Captain Murphy. The result was the phrase “Murphy’s Law, Whatever Can Go Wrong, Will Go Wrong .”

Who was this remarkable Alamogordo resident? Seven years before the US sent the other famous Alamogordo resident Ham, (the three-year-old chimpanzee) into space aboard the Mercury Capsule Number 5, this Alamogordo resident, was himself a live monkey, in many speed and endurance tests that tested the limits of man verses speed and gravity.

This individual of remarkable endurance was John Paul Stapp. Dr. Stapp was a flight surgeon in the U.S. Army Air Forces at the end of World War II, continued in the field of aviation medicine after the war, and transferred to the U.S. Air Force when it was established in 1947, to continue his work on the human response to flight.

His interests from the beginning were in the limits of the human body, when subjected to the increasing forces provided by faster and faster aircraft. In the early 1950s, no one knew what humans could withstand when it came for g-forces, rapid spins, oxygen deprivation, and exposure to cosmic rays.  Stapp began a program of human testing to determine those limits, becoming chief of the Aeromedical Field Laboratory at Holloman Air Force Base, New Mexico and living in Alamogordo.

Dr. Stapp made history aboard the Sonic Wind I rocket sled on December 10, 1954, when he set a land speed record of 632 mph in five seconds, subjecting him to 20 Gs of force during acceleration.

Although he had many individuals, available from a group of volunteers for this dangerous test ride, Dr. Stobb chose himself for the mission. He claimed he did not want to place another person into such a potentially hazardous position.

When the sled stopped in just 1.4 seconds, Dr. Stapp was hit with a force equivalent to 46.2 Gs, more than anyone had yet endured voluntarily on the planet to that point. He set a speed record and was a man of much scientific study. Upon ending the ride, he managed half a smile, as he was pulled from the sled. Dr. Stapp was in significant pain, and his eyes flooded with blood from the bursting of almost all of capillaries in his eyes. As Dr.  Stapp was rushed to the hospital, his aids, doctors, scientist and he all worried that one or both of his retinas had detached, leaving him blind. Thanks to a studious medical team ready with treatment on the standby, by the next day, he had regained enough of his normal vision to be released by his doctors. His eyesight would never fully recover back to the status prior to the tests but he felt the test was well worth the risk and was happy that he did it verses sending one of the volunteers due to the risk. A less strong man might not have survived the test intact.

Acclaimed by the world press as “The Fastest Man on Earth,” Dr. Stapp became an international sensation, appearing on magazine covers, television, and as the subject of an episode of “This is Your Life!” He appeared on the cover of Time Magazine…

Dr. Stapp was a modest man, in person and was approachable. He lived in Alamogordo after leaving the Air Forece and till the end of his life. He used his public acclaim not for personal gain but to pursue his dream of improving automobile safety. As a proponent for public safety, he felt that the safety measures he and his teams were developing for military aircraft should also be used for civilian automobiles.

Dr. Stapp understood the power of celebrity. As such he used his celebrity status to push for the installation of seat belts in American cars. He understood how to politic, navigate the government bureaucracy and use his public persona to push the Department of Transportation to review and eventually implement many now standard safety features. The success of his campaign efforts for public safety is measured in thousands of lives saved and injuries lessened every year by the safety precautions he championed during his lifetime not only in the US but around the world as his measures were adopted as standard world-wide.

In those early years of the mid 1950’s Dr. Stapp had hoped to make more runs on the Sonic Wind, with a goal of surpassing 1000 mph, however in June 1956, the sled flew off its track during an unmanned run and was severely damaged beyond appropriate repair.

Dr. Stapp would later ride an air-powered sled known as the “Daisy Track” at Holloman, but never again would he be subjected to the rigors of rocket-powered travel.

Dr. Stapp as an Airforce Colonel next planned and directed the Man-High Project, three manned high-altitude balloon flights to test human endurance at the edge of space. Conducted in June and August 1957, the project’s highlight was the second mission, during which Lieutenant David G. Simons reached an altitude of almost 102,000 feet. Project Man-High was a tremendous scientific success and helped prepare for America’s initial manned space which of course did not happen until after Alamogordo’s other famous resident “Ham” the three-year-old chimpanzee had successfully been launched and returned safely.

Dr. Stapp retired from the Air Force as a colonel in 1970. He went on to become a professor at the University of California’s Safety and Systems Management Center, then a consultant to the Surgeon General and NASA.

He next served as the president of the New Mexico Research Institute in Alamogordo, New Mexico, as well as chairman of the annual “Dr. Stapp International Car Crash Conference.”

 In 1991, Stapp received the National Medal of Technology, “for his research on the effects of mechanical force on living tissues leading to safety developments in crash protection technology.” He was also honorary chairman of the Stapp Foundation, underwritten by General Motors to provide scholarships for automotive engineering students.

Dr. Stapp was a well-regarded Alamogordo resident and spoke often at the public high school, in lectures at NMSU Alamogordo and as a guest lecturer at the Space Hall of Fame in Alamogordo.  He was always open to talking with young impressionable individuals encouraging the study of science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

Colonel Dr. John Stapp died in Alamogordo on November 13, 1999, at the age of eighty-nine. His many honors and awards included enrollment in the National Aviation Hall of Fame, the Air Force Cheney Award for Valor and the Lovelace Award from NASA for aerospace medical research.

Alamogordo, New Mexico has been called the cradle of America’s space program and offers a museum that applauds our exploration of the heavens with a mix of high-tech entertainment and dramatic exhibits. The United Space Hall of Fame and Space Museum in Alamogordo, New Mexico continues to honor Dr. John P. Stapp naming the Air & Space Park after him. Named after International Space Hall of Fame Inductee and aeromedical pioneer Dr. John P. Stapp, the Air and Space Park consists of large space-related artifacts documenting mankind’s exploration of space. Examples of exhibits include the Sonic Wind I rocket sled ridden by Dr. Stapp and the Little Joe II rocket which tested the Apollo Launch Escape System. At 86 feet tall, Little Joe II is the largest rocket ever launched from New Mexico. Many major breakthroughs in technology occurred in the Alamogordo area, and the museum offers a variety of exhibitions to showcase those milestones. Other features showcased are a tribute to the Delta Clipper Experimental; and the Clyde W. Tombaugh Theater and Planetarium, featuring a giant dome-screen and state-of-the-art surround sound to fully immerse the audience. If in the Alamogordo area or in Southern New Mexico this is a do not miss stop for anyone with an interest in space or the history of space exploration.

New Mexico Museum of Space History

LOCATION: Next to the New Mexico State University, Alamogordo at the Top of NM 2001, Alamogordo, NM

PHONE:(575) 437-2840

HOURS: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday, closed on Monday and Tuesday

ADMISSION: Adults are $8, Senior/Military/NM Resident $7, Children (4-12) $6, Tots (3 & Under) Free. New Mexico foster families are admitted free. Additional fees for theater and planetarium.

On the Web: www.NMSpaceMuseum.org

Article Author Chris Edwards, Alamogordo Town News, 2nd Life Media.

Excerpts and Source of Information: New Mexico Museum of Space History, The History Channel, Time Magazine September 12, 1955, The Discovery Channel, “Space Men: They were the first to brave the unknown (Transcript)”. American Experience. PBS. March 1, 2016. Retrieved January 2, 2019. “Building 29: Aero Medical Laboratory”. Historic Buildings & Sites at Wright-Patterson AFB. United States Air Force. August 12, 2002. Archived from the original on June 22, 2008. Retrieved November 15, 2008. Spark, Nick T. “The Story of John Paul Stapp”. The Ejection Site. Stapp JP (August 1948). “Problems of human engineering in regard to sudden declarative forces on man”. Mil Surg. 103 (2): 99–102. PMID 18876408.  Aviation Week for 3 January 1955 says he accelerated to 632 mph in five seconds and 2800 feet, then coasted for half a second, then slowed to a stop in 1.4 seconds. It says the track was 3500 feet long. Spark, Nick T. (2006). “

A resident of Alamogordo, who worked at Alamogordo New Mexico’s Holloman Air Force Base, made history in the U.S. space program and history for travel at a speed faster than a .45-caliber bullet in an experiment to test the limits of human endurance.

That same Alamogordo resident was known as the “fastest man on Earth” during the research phase of the US space program to the moon. He accelerated in five seconds from a standstill to 632 m.p.h. The New York Herald Tribune called this Alamogordo resident “a gentleman who can stop on a dime and give you 10 cents change.”

He won what will perhaps be even more lasting fame in a test five years earlier, when he suffered injuries owing to a mistake by a US Airforce Captain Murphy. The result was the phrase “Murphy’s Law.”

Who was this remarkable Alamogordo resident? Seven years before the US sent the other famous Alamogordo resident Ham, (the three-year-old chimpanzee) into space aboard the Mercury Capsule Number 5, this Alamogordo resident, was himself a live monkey, in many speed and endurance tests that tested the limits of man verses speed and gravity.

Text

Description automatically generated

This individual of remarkable endurance was John Paul Stapp. Dr. Stapp was a flight surgeon in the U.S. Army Air Forces at the end of World War II, continued in the field of aviation medicine after the war, and transferred to the U.S. Air Force when it was established in 1947, to continue his work on the human response to flight.

A picture containing outdoor, transport, aircraft, old

Description automatically generated

His interests from the beginning were in the limits of the human body, when subjected to the increasing forces provided by faster and faster aircraft. In the early 1950s, no one knew what humans could withstand when it came for g-forces, rapid spins, oxygen deprivation, and exposure to cosmic rays.  Stapp began a program of human testing to determine those limits, becoming chief of the Aeromedical Field Laboratory at Holloman Air Force Base, New Mexico and living in Alamogordo.

Dr. Stapp made history aboard the Sonic Wind I rocket sled on December 10, 1954, when he set a land speed record of 632 mph in five seconds, subjecting him to 20 Gs of force during acceleration.

Although he had many individuals, available from a group of volunteers for this dangerous test ride, Dr. Stobb chose himself for the mission. He claimed he did not want to place another person into such a potentially hazardous position.

When the sled stopped in just 1.4 seconds, Dr. Stapp was hit with a force equivalent to 46.2 Gs, more than anyone had yet endured voluntarily on the planet to that point. He set a speed record and was a man of much scientific study. Upon ending the ride, he managed half a smile, as he was pulled from the sled. Dr. Stapp was in significant pain, and his eyes flooded with blood from the bursting of almost all of capillaries in his eyes. As Dr.  Stapp was rushed to the hospital, his aids, doctors, scientist and he all worried that one or both of his retinas had detached, leaving him blind. Thanks to a studious medical team ready with treatment on the standby, by the next day, he had regained enough of his normal vision to be released by his doctors. His eyesight would never fully recover back to the status prior to the tests but he felt the test was well worth the risk and was happy that he did it verses sending one of the volunteers due to the risk. A less strong man might not have survived the test intact.

Acclaimed by the world press as “The Fastest Man on Earth,” Dr. Stapp became an international sensation, appearing on magazine covers, television, and as the subject of an episode of “This is Your Life!” He appeared on the cover of Time Magazine…

A magazine with a person's face on it

Description automatically generated with medium confidence

Dr. Stapp was a modest man, in person and was approachable. He lived in Alamogordo after leaving the Air Forece and till the end of his life. He used his public acclaim not for personal gain but to pursue his dream of improving automobile safety. As a proponent for public safety, he felt that the safety measures he and his teams were developing for military aircraft should also be used for civilian automobiles.

Dr. Stapp understood the power of celebrity. As such he used his celebrity status to push for the installation of seat belts in American cars. He understood how to politic, navigate the government bureaucracy and use his public persona to push the Department of Transportation to review and eventually implement many now standard safety features. The success of his campaign efforts for public safety is measured in thousands of lives saved and injuries lessened every year by the safety precautions he championed during his lifetime not only in the US but around the world as his measures were adopted as standard world-wide.

In those early years of the mid 1950’s Dr. Stapp had hoped to make more runs on the Sonic Wind, with a goal of surpassing 1000 mph, however in June 1956, the sled flew off its track during an unmanned run and was severely damaged beyond appropriate repair.

Dr. Stapp would later ride an air-powered sled known as the “Daisy Track” at Holloman, but never again would he be subjected to the rigors of rocket-powered travel.

Dr. Stapp as an Airforce Colonel next planned and directed the Man-High Project, three manned high-altitude balloon flights to test human endurance at the edge of space. Conducted in June and August 1957, the project’s highlight was the second mission, during which Lieutenant David G. Simons reached an altitude of almost 102,000 feet. Project Man-High was a tremendous scientific success and helped prepare for America’s initial manned space which of course did not happen until after Alamogordo’s other famous resident “Ham” the three-year-old chimpanzee had successfully been launched and returned safely.

Dr. Stapp retired from the Air Force as a colonel in 1970. He went on to become a professor at the University of California’s Safety and Systems Management Center, then a consultant to the Surgeon General and NASA.

He next served as the president of the New Mexico Research Institute in Alamogordo, New Mexico, as well as chairman of the annual “Dr. Stapp International Car Crash Conference.”

 In 1991, Stapp received the National Medal of Technology, “for his research on the effects of mechanical force on living tissues leading to safety developments in crash protection technology.” He was also honorary chairman of the Stapp Foundation, underwritten by General Motors to provide scholarships for automotive engineering students.

Dr. Stapp was a well-regarded Alamogordo resident and spoke often at the public high school, in lectures at NMSU Alamogordo and as a guest lecturer at the Space Hall of Fame in Alamogordo.  He was always open to talking with young impressionable individuals encouraging the study of science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

Colonel Dr. John Stapp died in Alamogordo on November 13, 1999, at the age of eighty-nine. His many honors and awards included enrollment in the National Aviation Hall of Fame, the Air Force Cheney Award for Valor and the Lovelace Award from NASA for aerospace medical research.

Alamogordo, New Mexico has been called the cradle of America’s space program and offers a museum that applauds our exploration of the heavens with a mix of high-tech entertainment and dramatic exhibits. The United Space Hall of Fame and Space Museum in Alamogordo, New Mexico continues to honor Dr. John P. Stapp naming the Air & Space Park after him. Named after International Space Hall of Fame Inductee and aeromedical pioneer Dr. John P. Stapp, the Air and Space Park consists of large space-related artifacts documenting mankind’s exploration of space. Examples of exhibits include the Sonic Wind I rocket sled ridden by Dr. Stapp and the Little Joe II rocket which tested the Apollo Launch Escape System. At 86 feet tall, Little Joe II is the largest rocket ever launched from New Mexico. Many major breakthroughs in technology occurred in the Alamogordo area, and the museum offers a variety of exhibitions to showcase those milestones. Other features showcased are a tribute to the Delta Clipper Experimental; and the Clyde W. Tombaugh Theater and Planetarium, featuring a giant dome-screen and state-of-the-art surround sound to fully immerse the audience. If in the Alamogordo area or in Southern New Mexico this is a do not miss stop for anyone with an interest in space or the history of space exploration.

New Mexico Museum of Space History

LOCATION: Next to the New Mexico State University, Alamogordo at the Top of NM 2001, Alamogordo, NM

PHONE:(575) 437-2840

HOURS: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday, closed on Monday and Tuesday

ADMISSION: Adults are $8, Senior/Military/NM Resident $7, Children (4-12) $6, Tots (3 & Under) Free. New Mexico foster families are admitted free. Additional fees for theater and planetarium.

On the Web: www.NMSpaceMuseum.org

Article Author Chris Edwards, Alamogordo Town News, 2nd Life Media.

Excerpts and Source of Information: New Mexico Museum of Space History, The History Channel, Time Magazine September 12, 1955, The Discovery Channel, “Space Men: They were the first to brave the unknown (Transcript)”. American Experience. PBS. March 1, 2016. Retrieved January 2, 2019. “Building 29: Aero Medical Laboratory”. Historic Buildings & Sites at Wright-Patterson AFB. United States Air Force. August 12, 2002. Archived from the original on June 22, 2008. Retrieved November 15, 2008. Spark, Nick T. “The Story of John Paul Stapp”. The Ejection Site. Stapp JP (August 1948). “Problems of human engineering in regard to sudden declarative forces on man”. Mil Surg. 103 (2): 99–102. PMID 18876408.  Aviation Week for 3 January 1955 says he accelerated to 632 mph in five seconds and 2800 feet, then coasted for half a second, then slowed to a stop in 1.4 seconds. It says the track was 3500 feet long. Spark, Nick T. (2006). “Whatever Can Go Wrong, Will Go Wrong”: A History of Murphy’s Law. Periscope Film. ISBN 9780978638894. OCLC 80015522″: A History of Murphy’s Law. Periscope Film. ISBN 9780978638894. OCLC 80015522

Coaches Bill Aldridge & 28 year veteran Tommy Standefer have set the standard for Southern New Mexico Golf in a program with roots to the 1950s

Alamogordo has a long history of golf success dating back to the 1960’s under coach Billy Aldridge. To learn more and to hear coach Billy Aldridge’s story check our story archives or listen to our podcast on Spotify at https://open.spotify.com/episode/3RNff9f7XPuS6pMcZJBb4l

the New Mexico Activities association offered State Tournaments in Golf for boys beginning in 1933. The first Boy in the state of New Mexico to win a State Golf Title was Ralph Petty of Carrizozo in 1933.

Alamogordo High School Boys Golf program began to gain some tracking in the 50’s was was not recognized as truly competitive until the 1960s and 1970s under the leadership of Billy Aldridge. He was credited with creating a legitimate program that was a model high schools and community colleges around the country. The Alamogordo Boys Golf program has won 3 state titles and 4 individuals titles in the boys division since inception. 

State Individual Boys Title holders include:

  • 1966 AA Bruce McKenzie
  • 1971 AAAA Brad Bryant
  • 1973 AAAA Brad Bryant
  • 2008 AAAAA Jeffery O’Dell with scores of 76-73 total 149

State Boys Gold Team Titles were won in:

  • 1965 AA Alamogordo Coach Bill Aldridge
  • 1971 AAAA Alamogordo Coach Bill Aldridge
  • 1972 AAAA Alamogordo Coach Bill Aldridge

Girls Golf was not sanctioned as an interscholastic sport until 1973. The first girl to wine a state title was Nancy Romero of Socorro in 1973.

State Individual Girls Title holders include:

  • 1995 AAAA Dianne Overstreet
  • 1999 AAAA Tiada Lane with a total score of 160
  • 2003 AAAAA Destini Esquero  with scores of 78-78 totaling156
  • 2011 AAAAA Kacey Dalpes  with score of 79-77 totaling 156
  • AAAAA Kacey Dalpes with a score of 69-76 totaling 145

State Boys Girls Team Titles were won in:

  • 1996 AAAA Alamogordo Coach Scott Summers 
  • 2001 AAAAA Alamogordo Coach Tommy Standefer
  • 2002 AAAAA Alamogordo Coach Tommy Standefer 
  • 2003 AAAAA Alamogordo Tommy Standefer

Coach Tommy Standefer won 3 girls golf state titles in a row between 2001 and 2003. Coach Standefer has coached for Alamogordo for almost 28 years and is still coaching and assisted by Coach Billy Hays. The Alamogordo Girls have attended a state tournament 28 times in the last 30 years. Fifteen times, the girls have finished with a trophy, either first, second or third, at state a record to be very proud of.

The Alamogordo Golf Teams most recent play was Wednesday at the Chaparral Invitational.

 The Alamogordo Boys finished 2nd at Chaparral on Wednesday. 

  • Boys Tyler Cullers – 82
  • Michael Overstreet – 92
  • Bradley McMillen – 92
  • Colin Silva – 93
  • Marco Terrazas – 100

In Girls Golf competition the girls did not have a complete team at Chaparral.

  • Sophia Fredrick – 100
  • Chloe Johnston – 110
  • Kylie Rideout – 133

Both teams next compete at Deming Tournament May 7th, 2021.