New Sculpture Release by Artist Rene Sepulveda: “Angelina” Flowing Ivy, Wood and Lava Rock Natural Native American Inspired Sculpture

Angelina Flowing Ivy, Wood and Lava Rock Natural Native American Inspired Sculpture Artist Rene Sepulveda available at artistrenesepulveda.com or at Roadrunner Emporium & Fine Arts Gallery Alamogordo New Mexico

“Angelina” Flowing Ivy, Abstract Wooden Basket and Lava Rock Natural Native American Inspired Sculpture by Artist Rene Sepulveda

“Angelina” A Flowing Ivy, Abstract Wood Basket and Lava Rock Natural Sculpture by the Artist Rene Sepulveda was crafted as a piece to honor his 80-year-old aunt Bertha Angelina Sepulveda Rommel.
The historic symbolism of ivy, central to the sculpture by Rene Sepulveda as it reaches out of the wooden basket deals with connections of family, because of its propensity to interweave in growth. Ever furrowing and intertwining, the ivy is an example of the twists and turns our relationships and family connections take – but also a testimony to the long-lasting connections and bonds we form that last over the years. Ivy is further considered a symbol of survival and determination for the same reasons. It seems to be virtually indestructible and will often return after it has suffered damage or has been severely cut back symbolic of the indestructability of family.

This is an example of the human spirit and the strength we all have, to carry on regardless of how harrowing our setbacks may have been.

The basket is one of humankind’s oldest art forms, and it is certainly an ethnic and cultural icon filled with myth and motif, religion and symbolism, and decoration as well as usefulness. Taping in the artist Native American heritage of his ancestors he felt a wooden pieced basket was an essential part of this sculpture due to its symbolism and history as a not to his family roots. The Native Americans may well have left the greatest legacy to the world of baskets. The Indians of Arizona and New Mexico made basket-molded pottery from 5000 to 1000 B.C. as part of the earliest basket heritage. Their baskets (many of which have survived in gravesites) are heralded as a pure art form and one that was created not only by a primitive people but also by women. Basketry extended into the making of many other materials the Indians used daily including fishing nets, animal and fish snares, cooking utensils that were so finely woven that they were waterproof, ceremonial costumes and baskets, and even plaques. The Hopi, Apache, and other Pueblo tribes made coiled baskets with bold decorations and geometric patterns of both dyed and natural fibers. Thus, the bold geometric coloring and shape of the basket crafted into this artistic sculptured work by Rene Sepulveda.

The wood of which the basket hangs is of fallen branches that were gathered near the Apache Mescalero tribal basin and symbolize the strength of eternity. This strength lives on and transcends life and death representing the timeless strength of family.

The 5000-year-old lava rock of which is the sculptures base is composed of rock from the Valley of the Fire lava flow originating at Little Black Peak in Southern New Mexico. The selection of this material as the base was to signify the strength of the earth from deep within, as lava flows deep within the earth and periodically erupts, so do the emotional ties of a family. Those ties and emotional connections are buried deep and carry from one generation to the next, and on occasion erupt to show their true inner strength and strong bonds as the foundation of family.

Finally, the piece is capped with a metal Zia symbol. Given that this artistic creation was conceptualized, crafted and created with natural elements of New Mexico, Artist Rene Sepulveda found it only fitting to cap the piece with the Zia symbol which is sacred to the original people of New Mexico, from the Zia Pueblo and who regard the sun as sacred. Four is a sacred number of the Zia and can be found repeated in the points radiating from the circle.


The number four is embodied in:
The compass (north, south, east, and west)
The seasons of the year (spring, summer, autumn and winter)
The periods of each day (morning, noon, evening and night)
The stages of life (childhood, youth, middle years and elderhood)
The sacred aspects one must develop (a strong body, a clear mind, a pure spirit, and a devotion to the well-being of others)

That final aspect in symbolism of the Zia is what ties this artistic creation of Rene Sepulveda, entitled Angeline, together in each of those characteristics that speak of his aunt. She has always been one from youth to age 80 of strong body, clear mind, pure spirit and devotion to her family as well as the well-being of others.

Each component of this work of art independently is of beauty, but when combined into a sculptured work named “Angelina,” from the heart and mind of the Artist, Rene Sepulveda; one sees it spiritual relevance and reverence to family, presented as a visual piece of artistic beauty.

Available to be seen as part of the Valley of The Fire Collection Exhibition of Works of Artist Rene Sepulveda at 2nd Life Boutique and Gallery at Roadrunner Emporium and Fine Art Gallery, 928 New York Avenue, Alamogordo, New Mexico and is available online to ship for free anywhere in the US at https://www.etsy.com/listing/1007837864

Congratulations to the new owner of Artist Rene Sepulveda’s Abstract Sculpture titled “High Desert Bloom”

Congratulations to the new owner of Artist Rene Sepulveda’s Abstract Sculpture titled “High Desert Bloom.” This original abstract was showcased on exhibition at the Roadrunner Emporium & Gallery at the 2nd Life Art Gallery, 928 New York Avenue, Alamogordo, New Mexico and is SOLD and enroute to a collector of fine art in Austin, Texas, USA.

About the Piece: “High Desert Bloom” Artist Rene Sepulveda created this one-of-a-kind nod to the New Mexico high desert and white sands located near Alamogordo New Mexico. The piece was crafted with 5000-year-old Lava Rock from the Valley of the Fire Lave Flow, combined with ancient fallen driftwood and replicas of desert flowers that create a unique and inspiring view of natures “High Desert Bloom”. This one-of-a-kind piece is heavy, crafted from ancient lava flow rich in iron and heavy metals. The wood is ancient from the Lincoln Forest and the flowers are replicas of flowers colorized to the artists imagination and found in the High New Mexico Desert.

About the Collection: Artist Rene Sepulveda reaches from his Native American Tarahumara tribal roots and creates works of art from 5000-year-old New Mexican Volcanic Lava Rock paired with recycled metals fallen driftwoods to create art of nature for home, office or outdoor spaces. Highly prized and highly collectable. Approximately 5,000 years ago, Little Black Peak located in Southern New Mexico erupted and flowed 44 miles into the Tularosa Basin, filling the basin with molten rock. The resulting lava flow is four to six miles wide, 160 feet thick and covers 125 square miles. From a distance, the region appears as barren rock but when you visit the nature trails there are many varieties of flowers, cactus, trees, and bushes typical of the Chihuahuan desert. Animals include a variety of desert ants, bugs, bats, roadrunners, quail, cottontails, mule deer, barberry sheep, lizards, great horned owls, burrowing owls, turkey vultures, hawks, gnat catchers, cactus wrens, sparrows, and golden eagles and more.

This collection of works crafted by Artist Rene Sepulveda is inspired by his Tarahumara tribal roots as a tribute to the wildlife, flowers, cactus, and beauty of the region, crafted from recycled lava, woods and metals found from the Tularosa Basin and Sacramento Basin. The molten lava rock is repurposed rock pulled from abandoned homes and abandoned locations; repurposed into a “second life” as an “artistic sculpture” to bring joy and value to the owner of each unique piece.

#2ndLifeMedia#2ndLifeBoutique#LocalArts#AlamogordoArts#ArtistReneSepulveda#RoadrunnerEmporium#AlamogordoTownNews#AlamogordoMainStreet#NewMexicoArts#NativeAmericanArt#AbstractArt#DesertArt#2ndLifeGallery#RoadrunnerEmporiumArtGallery#NaturalArtSculptures

“Ventricle” A Tree Root Art Sculptured New Release by Artist Rene Sepulveda, 2nd Life Boutique Roadrunner Emporium, Alamogordo New Mexico

2nd Life Media with locations in California and New Mexico, representing Artist Artist Rene Sepulveda is proud to announce the launch of an amazing large new (8 foot by 6 foot in size) root art sculpture titled “Ventricle” has been released for exhibition and for sale.  “Ventricle” a root art sculpture by Rene Sepulveda, represents, “the emergence from a Covid winter into a spring of life with respect to to the systems of science and the communion with nature for humanity to move forward.”

“Ventricle” A Fine 8 foot large Root Art Sculpture by the Artist Rene Sepulveda 2nd Life Boutique Roadrunner Emporium

This piece is located in Alamogordo New Mexico and showcased and sold via the 2nd Life Boutique at the Roadrunner Emporium, 928 New York Avenue, Alamogordo, New Mexico.

This is a perfect selection for the art collector that has everything. Rene Sepulveda was inspired by his Native American roots and an appreciation for root artists world wide such as the renowned works of Henrique Oliveria

New Mexico, Artist Rene Sepulveda procures his roots from the depths of the Lincoln National Forest in Southern New Mexico and then relies on his inspiration from athletics and his masters in Epidemiology to ignite his passions for color, texture and an appreciation of the science then expresses himself using the beauty of nature as his canvas.

“Ventricle” is a one of a kind piece. When purchased, the artist will install on location anywhere in the continental US, to ensure proper accent lighting and care for this significant museum worthy piece.

Ideal for the art collector that has everything, a business wanting to make a statement or a museum or gallery piece.

Root art (tree root art) by former NCAA Coach turned Southwestern Sculptured Artist Rene Sepulveda, reaches our soul as a medium that is deep in engagement of our emotional senses to commune with nature. The medium of roots pleases an inner human emotion that symbolizes our personal growth.

Tree Root Art ROOTART helps to convey themes of security and stability, symbolizing the need to stay grounded so we remain safe. That feeling is even more needed and is tapped into even more so in this post Covid world we are coming out of. This piece is a tribute to that triumph to survive and to the stability of science and its interconnectedness to our inner being or the soul of humanity.

Many works of the root art pieces crafted by artist Rene Sepulveda have been showcased in the media and used in window displays as well as being additions to some of America’s finest homes and businesses. 

The most famous and largest root art collection in the world is located in the UK and is owned by Prince Charles. 

Tree Root Art ROOTART helps to convey themes of security and stability, symbolizing the need to stay grounded so we remain safe.

What is the origin of Root Art?

The root of a plant, of course, is the part that usually grows underground, secures the plant in place, absorbs minerals and water, and stores food manufactured by leaves and other plant parts. Roots grow in a root system and as such can be seen as reaching, thus inspiring and artistic in design.

Native American artist, Tibetan artist and few others believe in the essence of the root system, the beauty, and the symbolism  to the complexities of personal growth and being grounded to craft works of natural beauty. 

Art comes from Latin –Artem ‘skill’ that usually refers to the quality or expressions of what is beautiful or of great significance. For instance, the word artefact refers to an object of cultural interest made by a human being.

Thus ROOT ART is the combination of the wood from the natural root system combined with a skilled artists ability to combine color, texture and designs into a masterpiece that is eye catching and alludes to the grace of nature.  

Fitness Coach & Artist; Rene Sepulveda has developed a method of selecting interesting and entertaining root systems, combining them with color, texture, and the elements of nature.

Purchase this one of a kind piece today – “Ventricle’ A Post Covid Root Art Sculpture “dedicated to survival” by former NCAA Coach, now Author and Artist Rene Sepulveda.

Come see in person. Come and visit to see a majority of the 2nd Life Boutique, Valley of the Fires Collection of art; by Rene Sepulveda, window displays and books by visual artist and author Chris Edwards, the fabric creations of Rita Sepulveda, plus over 40 other partner artists, antiquities dealers, jewelers and vendors at Roadrunner Emporium, 928 New York Avenue, Alamogordo New Mexico

To learn more visit: https://artistrenesepulveda.co…

or 

https://2ndlifemedia.com/tree-root-art-rootart

or to see the full array of offerings visit

https://www.etsy.com/shop/2ndLifeBoutiqueStore

“Ventricle” Video behind the scenes of a root art sculpture by Artist Rene Sepulveda. “Ventricle” a root art sculpture by Rene Sepulveda, represents, “the emergence from a Covid winter into a spring of life with respect to to the systems of science and the communion with nature for humanity to move forward.”

2nd Life Boutique Artist Rene Sepulveda Introduces his Valley of the Fires Sculpture Collection

The Valley of The Fires Collection – Volcanic Lava Stone, Wood & Metal Sculptured Art by New Mexico Artist Rene Sepulveda on exhibition at the 2nd Life Boutique of Roadrunner Emporium, 928 New York Avenue Alamogordo, New Mexico.

Approximately 5,000 years ago, Little Black Peak located in Southern New Mexico erupted and flowed 44 miles into the Tularosa Basin, filling the basin with molten rock. The resulting lava flow is four to six miles wide, 160 feet thick and covers 125 square miles.

From a distance, the region appears as barren rock but when you visit the nature trails there are many varieties of flowers, cactus, trees, and bushes typical of the Chihuahuan desert. Animals include a variety of desert ants, bugs, bats, roadrunners, quail, cottontails, mule deer, barberry sheep, lizards, great horned owls, burrowing owls, turkey vultures, hawks, gnat catchers, cactus wrens, sparrows, and golden eagles and more.
This collection of sculptured works crafted by Artist Rene Sepulveda is a tribute to the wildlife, flowers, cactus, and beauty of the region, crafted from recycled lava, woods and metals found from the Tularosa Basin and Sacramento Basin. The molten lava rock is repurposed rock pulled from abandoned homes and abandoned locations; repurposed into a “second life” as an “artistic sculptured art piece” to bring joy and value to the owner of each unique piece.
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Artist Rene Sepulveda was introduced to the beauty of natural lava mixed with metal and wooden elements, during his childhood visits to the home of Mr. and Ms. Pack, of Alamogordo, whose exclusive estate was custom built and designed to showcase these unique local elements.

Years later Rene Sepulveda has designed this collection of natural sculptures in memory of their inspiration. Each is distinctly different as no two pieces of lava rock are the same. Each is cleaned, treated, sealed, and enhanced to preserve that natural elements of the artistic creation for generations of enjoyment.

Each comes with a letter of authenticity signed by the artist and each piece of art is marked with an identifier of its origin from the artist, Rene Sepulveda.

2nd Life Media and Boutique under the direction of Author, Artistic Director & Executive Coach, Chris Edwards is honored to be implementing the artistic vision of the Artist Rene Sepulveda and his Valley of the Fires Sculptured Arts Collection and that of our collective of artists and vendors showcased at Roadrunner Emporium and partner galleries.
View the collection in person at Roadrunner Emporium, 928 New York Avenue, Alamogordo, New Mexico.

This unique collection of Rene Sepulveda crafted designs may be seen in person or they may be purchased online at
https://www.etsy.com/shop/2ndLifeBoutiqueStore

Author/Artist/Coach Rene Sepulveda 1st Place Valentine Competition Winner Road Runner Emporium, 2nd Life Media

Thank you for the support and the public voting our entry as #1 in the Roadrunner Emporium Valentines Box Contest. We appreciate the public vote or confidence. Come on by Roadrunner Emporium, 928 New York Avenue, Alamogordo join, Author and Executive Coach Chris Edwards, owner Debra Reyes, Artist René Sepulveda and the over 40 artist and vendors offering many great values in home decor, women’s apparel, antiques, jewelry, photography, paintings, repurposed gifts, farm fresh eggs, local honey and more.

Check us out Monday thru Saturday 10 am to 5 pm.

If you drop by this Monday 2-15-2021 during the hours of 10 to 5, Author Chris Edwards on his Southwestern US Book tour will be on site, to sign Coach Bob Sepulveda the Early Days book 1 on sale at the gallery and online. Drop by this Monday

Also check out the stores on Etsy or learn more about Author Chris Edwards on Amazon

https://www.etsy.com/shop/2ndLifeBoutiqueStore?ref=search_shop_redirect

!#ShopLocal#ShopAlamogordo#AlamogordoMainStreet#ArtistReneSepulveda#2ndLifeMedia#2ndLifeBoutique#AlamogordoArts#ShopNewMexico#DiscoverAlamogordo

Remembering the Challenger 35 years later – Author Chris Edwards

The Space Shuttle Challenger disaster was a fatal incident in the United States’ space program that occurred on January 28, 1986, when the Space Shuttle Challenger (OV-099) broke apart 73 seconds into its flight, killing all seven crew members aboard. The crew consisted of five NASA astronauts, and two payload specialists. The mission carried the designation STS-51-L and was the tenth flight for the Challenger orbiter. The Challenger disaster should best be remembered for the sacrifice of seven astronauts who died in the accident-  Judith ResnikDick Scobee, Capt. Michael J. SmithEllison Onizuka,  Ronald McNairChrista McAuliffe, and Gregory Jarvis.

But for those currently in leadership positions, it should also be remembered as a colossal failure of process – a process designed by the best and the brightest. By the people who sent men to the moon. That was a sobering thought on January 28, 1986, and it remains so today.

The space shuttle Challenger disaster remains one of the most evocative events of the American 20th Century—and for more than just the obvious reasons.

Certainly, the 35th anniversary of this tragedy returns to mind a multitude of images, memories and emotions that prompt pause. But it also reminds us of the crucial importance of informed decision making and risk oversight which are as relevant today as they were on January 28, 1986.

As some will remember, the specific, highly technical cause of the Challenger accident was the notorious “O-Ring”; i.e. the failure of the pressure seal in the aft field joint of the right solid rocket motor. The failure was due to a faulty design unacceptably sensitive to a number of factors, including the effects of cold temperature (launchpad temperature was 36 degrees on January 28).

But more important to remember is the decidedly non-technical contributing cause: the multiple risk management errors that fatally flawed the Challenger launch decision. As documented by the presidential review commission, these were not errors arising from system complexities, but rather from the erosion of once-effective and redundant safety protocols. 

Space, space exploration and the benefits are not without risk. The risk is worth the reward however we should never sacrifice safety protocols and redundancy further the governments legislative branch has a responsibility of checks and balances in oversight to ensure safety is in place, contracts are not awarded unfairly and the value to the American people in life and treasure is never taken for granted.

Our hearts continue to bleed for the errors of that fateful day but our quest for what is out there amongst the stars should always continue…

A Photo of the Space Shuttle Challenger lifts off – January 26, 1986 seen on authorchrisedwards.com website.

Our heart pour out to our hero’s of the space program but our minds always look up and forward in the quest forward for what lies above us. We are not alone!

Celebrating Officer Eugene Goodman protecting Democracy- Send a Thank You

🚨ACTION🚨: Several of my friends are sending a heartfelt “Thank you” note to Officer Eugene Goodman, the hero that saved lives during the domestic terrorist attack on the Capitol. This is the officer that realized the Senate door was unguarded and tricked the rioters into following him away from the senate chamber doors and up stairs away from the elected officials. In doing so it has now been proven he potentially saved the Vice President and others as a few of those chasing him were indeed armed and one had restraints with the intention of holding senators hostage so as they would not be in session to count the votes for president. This officer with only a baton is an America Hero. He is who should be receiving the Presidential medal of Freedom. Show your support of this courageous officer and send a thank you in support of the Blue to:

Officer Eugene Goodman

US Capitol Police

119 D ST NE

Washington DC 20510

This officer protected democracy and is an example of the Blue Line

🚨ACTION🚨: Several of my friends are sending a heartfelt “Thank you” note to Officer Eugene Goodman, the hero that saved lives during the domestic terrorist attack on the Capitol. This is the officer that realized the Senate door was unguarded and tricked the rioters into following him away from the senate chamber doors and up stairs away from the elected officials. In doing so it has now been proven he potentially saved the Vice President and others as a few of those chasing him were indeed armed and one had restraints with the intention of holding senators hostage so as they would not be in session to count the votes for president. This officer with only a baton is an America Hero. He is who should be receiving the Presidential medal of Freedom. Show your support of this courageous officer and send a thank you in support of the Blue to:

Officer Eugene Goodman

US Capitol Police

119 D ST NE

Washington DC 20510