Excerpt from: Get F–ing Real, Get Right! Harsh Motivation for a Rough & Tough World

Harsh Motivation for a Rough & Tough World Get Fuc-ing Real, Get Right! From Best Selling Self Help Author Chris Edwards of 90 Days to a Glass Half Full Lifestyle and 2 Hours Unplugged: Unplug & Reconnect

This book is also dedicated to some of my rough and tough formal co-workers in the trucking and distribution side of the business. Roslyn and Miranda cornered me one day and said, “I get it Chris, I get the positive thinking and the quotes but I need them real. They need grit or vulgarity to be real to me.”
So, Roslyn & Miranda and to the group that worked with you on the dock and in the trucks. This one is real and just for you. This one consists of a little humor, some vulgarities in wit, some quotes that will make you think and take action and other that may make you say WTF?
Thank you for the motivation to do a book with a little grit and to be real.
Enjoy, Chris Edwards, Napa California, Spring

Lesson 1

Put down the fu—ing phone, get off Facebook, stop with the Tweets. Quit making excuses and blaming all the dumb-as-es around you. Take a moment each day and take some responsibility for yourself. Open a book. Fu—ing read and realize that you can actually become something if you get your head out of your ass and actually educate yourself.

Now, a few of you asked me to be real with you so here it is. You have potential, but you are so stuck into the drama around you and just bitching about it rather than do something about it. You have the potential as you have been through a lot of shit. I know it, you know it and everyone that knows you, knows it. Hell, it may even be a miracle you are still alive and survived the shit in your past to get you here.

So now stop. Take 15 minutes each day aside and put a plan in place to get your shit together. You are a good person under that tough foul exterior.

You Get Fu–ing Real, Get Right! You want things and deserve a good life. So, take 15 minutes a day and let’s evaluate the day.

Begin the day by reading one of our daily quotes and put it into action. Some are actionable, some will just make you think. Others will make you go, WTF.

But here is the plan.

First put down the phone and put things in life in perspective.

• In 1900, <10% of families owned a stove, or had access to electricity or phones

• In 1915, <10% of families owned a car

• In 1930, <10% of families owned a refrigerator or clothes washer

• In 1945, <10% of families owned a clothes dryer or air-conditioning • In 1960, <10% of families owned a dishwasher or color TV

• In 1975, <10% of families owned a microwave in 1990,

Today, at least 90% of the country has a stove, electricity, car, fridge, clothes washer, air-conditioning, color TV, microwave, and cell phone. We are living in a faster paced world that is adopting the use of technology faster then ever before.

When you bitch about how bad your work or life is remember how your grandparents lived 50 years ago or your grand parents before them.

Remember what life was like for you when Get Fu–ing Real, Get Right! You were either incarcerated, or in the streets or involved with drugs, or in an abusive relationship or just totally miserable.

There is always hope if we give a fuc- to recognize it. So “unplug” for a few minutes and work with me to work with you through the book or podcast before us.

Now here is the shitter of how that phone is impacting us and we don’t even see it. People don’t want to put down their phones to focus or even read this book or listen to an educational podcast. I see it everywhere…

• Young couples out to dinner pull out their smartphones to check messages, emails and social networks even before scanning the menu, and check their phones repeatedly throughout the meal.

• Shoppers and commuters standing in line, people crossing busy streets, even cyclists and drivers whose eyes are on their phones instead of their surroundings. (I recently got into an discussion online via an app Facebook), with a member of the Napa City Council; Doris, who suggested “making cell phone usage on the downtown sidewalks illegal.” I expressed my frustration in her comment, but I do empathize with where she was coming from in the dialog of people being distracted. (However, as much as we want to, we cannot legislate common sense.)

• Toddlers in strollers playing with a smart-phone instead of observing and learning from the world around them. (And, we wonder what contributes to Attention Deficit Disorder?)Get Fu–ing Real, Get Right!

• People driving down the street with eyes on their phones, texting or playing apps, nearly bumping into other cars and running off the road or over curbs or crashing into obstacles.

There is an argument that the access to digital technology bombarding us and beginning at ever-younger ages, is transforming modern society. The transformation may be in ways that can have negative effects on physical and mental health, neurological development and personal relationships. Or as some suggest they are making us Zombies, driving our brains to mush and in a loss of true human interaction or true connections.

Have we forgot how to “unplug” meaning put the phone on sleep mode or (gosh forbid), turn it off? Have we actually forgot how to go for a walk with a dog, meet and actually chat with friends, acquaintances and strangers while being unplugged?

Can we do it without feeling anxious?

As with everything in life, moderation in the use of our smart-phone should be the hallmark of a healthy interaction with technology.

Too many of us have become slaves to the devise that was supposed to free us, connect us and give us more time; to experience life and the people we love. Instead, we’re constantly bombarded by bells, buzzes and chimes that alert us to messages that we feel compelled to view and respond to immediately.

We get anxious with every ding or chime. A 2015 study released by Deloitte found that Americans collectively check their smart-phones upwards of 8 billion times per day. That means we as individuals check at least 59 times per day, to check emails, text or those Facebook Likes, those amazing Tweets or the most recent Instagram cat photos.

More disturbing trends Deloitte also found that ….

• 81% of Americans spend time looking at their phones while dining out in restaurants.

• 26% of those in the 18-24 age range said they look at their phones immediately upon waking up.

So have you replaced your addiction to drugs, alcohol, porn, cigarettes or whatever with cell phone overdrive. You bet your sweet ass you are getting close.

Let’s look at the signs.

In an article for Health & Trends, Signs & Symptoms of Mobile Phone Addiction and How to deal with it? By Deepak Kumar September 5, 2015; we learn the signs of Smart-phone App Addiction… 20 Signs and Symptoms of Mobile Phone Addiction:

• You keep your phone in your hand all the time remains in your hand more rather than in your pocket or bag. • You get tensed when your phone goes out of your site.

• You spend more time on watching the mobile phone screen rather than any other activity.

• Your phone battery rarely lasts for a day.

• The very first thing you check while leaving any place is your phone. • You even take your phone to the bathroom.

• You keep on checking mobile notifications even when there aren’t any.

• Your day starts with checking notifications on your mobile phones and it ends in the same way.

• The mobile phone is the first thing you look out for just after waking up and you keep your phone near the pillow while sleeping.

• You feel a constant urge to just check whether your phone is with you or not. • You feel like your phone is vibrating even when it isn’t.

• You care for your phone more than your life or anything else in the world.

• Even the thought of losing or misplacing phone scares the hell out of you.

• You carry an extra battery or your charger/power bank with you all the time so that you never run out of battery while using your phone.

• You just unlock and lock your phone time to time without any need.

• Even a small scratch on your phone or a crack on display hurts you a lot.

• You have almost each and every app on your phone and you keep your phone much more organized then your cupboard, desk or bedroom.

• In a group meeting or even at your work station, you are the first to pick the phone out from a pocket and last to keep it back.

• You are constantly scolded by your loved ones or your boss for your growing closeness to your smart-phone.

• You are fighting the work no cell phone policy while on the work floor.

• You are ready to live alone only on the condition that you have your smart-phone with you.

Almost everyone I know, shows some of the signs, above. Does that mean they are a smart-phone addict? Not necessarily. Is Smart-phone addiction real? Yes, it is real.

According to Psychguides.com, An American Addiction Center Resource; Cell phone addiction, sometimes referred to as problematic mobile phone use, is a behavioral addiction thought to be similar to that of an Internet, gambling, shopping, or video game addiction and leads to severe impairment or distress in one’s life.

Their resource article continues: “In a study conducted by Baylor University, cell phone addiction was linked to:

•Impulsiveness and materialism.

•A preoccupation with material objects as opposed to intellectual, spiritual, or cultural values.

•The obsessive use of a smart-phone has been compared to that of credit card misuse and compulsive buying.

Smart-phones have become a representation of social status and thus, there is pressure to own the newest release and to have all of the best applications. People suffering from this condition often times have what has been coined “nomophobia,” or the fear of being without one’s cell phone. Problematic cell phone users can develop a social media addiction as well, which has a number of harmful effects on the user, such as:

•Impaired self-esteem.

•Impaired work performance.

•Interpersonal conflicts.

With the widespread accessibility of cell phones at a younger age now, teenagers are especially prone to developing an addiction to their cell phones or social media. Whether you or a loved one suffers from a cell phone addiction, there is hope for recovery and resources available.

Refer to the website Psychguides.com, for further resources. This book, nor my tamer one: 2 Hours Unplugged: Unplug & Reconnect, is not an indictment of Smart Phones, how you fuc-ing use them; nor apps nor about overcoming addiction.

This is not a treatment plan but a recommended lifestyle recommendation. So put down the damn phone and pay attention to yourself and the real people around you.

These lessons paired with those 90 Days to a Glass Half Full Lifestyle which is less blunt, serves as a reminder to “unplug or disconnect” and to “reconnect to those around you. Quit, being a Zombie or a slave to the smart-phone devise and its apps. Participate again, even if just for 2 hours a day, and enjoy those and the wonders of the life around you. The premise of these idea and those that follow in other posts, podcasts and the book series is for you to get real with yourself, unplug or disconnect from the smart-phone gadget, so that you may re-plug or reconnect yourself into the present joy of living!

Now put it down and let’s live a life in the present!

Author Chris Edwards speaks around the country on disconnecting and being present in daily living. To find out more about him and his lessons visit 2ndlifemedia.com

History- The 1920’s The Rise of High School Athletics Associations, the founding of the New Mexico Athletics Association & Alamogordo’s 1st State Winners -Author Chris Edwards

This article and podcast continues our series with excerpts and research from our book series on the history of New Mexico High School Athletics centered around Alamogordo High School from 1912 forward. The book series began with book 1 –Bob Sepulveda: The Early Days focuses us on a history lesson of the founding of interscholastic athletics and carries us to 1976.  Soon to be released Bob Sepulveda The Golden Years book 2 goes into the years 1977 forward to more modern times.

This book series along with complimentary articles, blog posts and pod casts are a historical review reflecting a tapestry of stories and emotions, of the political and social tensions and policies of the times, the medals that were won and stories behind some of those medals. A few stories can be uncomfortable in the outcome while others are inspiring.

Today’s excerpts follows the founding of high school activities associations and some of the politics around that founding.

Interscholastic Sports at the High School level via organized physical education programs did not begin in the US until around 1903 but had roots dating to the 1880s. Organized sports began with economically challenged or lower-class children competing under non-parental adult supervision, while their upper- class counterparts participated in non- competitive activities like dancing and music lessons, often in their homes. Children’s tournaments, especially athletic ones, came first to economically challenged children, most often immigrants living in large urban areas or the larger US cities.

Massachusetts was the first state to make schooling compulsory in 1852. It was not until 1917 that the final state of the union at the time, Mississippi, passed a similar law.

While on the east coast the focus was on social progress, education and organized school sports programs; the wild west was playing catch up. New cities like Alamogordo, New Mexico founded 1898 were creating new opportunities for Americans and America’s youth. January 6, 1912, New Mexico was admitted into the United States union as the 47th state. With that our history of interscholastic High School Athletics Track & Field in Alamogordo soon begins. New Mexico, even while a territory, took a progressive view to public education and made public education compulsory in urban areas in 1891. It became compulsory everywhere by the time New Mexico became a state in 1912.

With the institution of mandatory schooling in New Mexico and in most states, children and families experienced a profound shift in the structure of their daily lives, especially in the social organization of their time. This change in social view resulted in thinking about how to challenge a child and occupy his day especially in urban areas.

The answer lay partly in competitive sports leagues, which started to evolve to hold the interest of children. Urban reformers were particularly preoccupied with poor low skilled economically and socially challenged immigrants who, because of overcrowding in tenements or inner cities, were often on the streets. Initial organization efforts focused on the establishment of city parks and playgrounds. Powerful, organized playground movements developed in New York City and Boston. But because adults did not trust boys, especially immigrant boys, to play unsupervised without significant issues, attention soon shifted to organized sports. Sports were important in teaching immigrants and those economically challenged and from rural areas; the “American values of cooperation, hard work, and respect for authority.”

According to historian Robert Halpern, “progressive reformers thought athletic activities could prepare children especially boys for the new industrial society that was emerging, which would require them to be physical laborers.” There was a distinct business interest in organized youth sports early on, to ensure a robust and healthy workforce for an economy changing from, rural based to urban based, in the decades to follow.

Organized youth groups backed by the influence of business interests took on the responsibility of providing children with sports activities. In 1903, New York City’s Public-School Athletic League for Boys was established by Luther Gulick, and formal contests between children, organized by adults, emerged to keep the boys coming back to school. Formal competition ensured the boys’ continued participation since they wanted to defend their school team’s record and honor. The purpose per the PSLA was to encourage a healthy, strong body and mind through competitive exercises.

The PSAL initially conducted “class athletics” in grades five through eight at specific times each year, not interschool competition as it is known today. Class athletics included seasonal track and field events. PSAL’s also emphasized swimming, popular sports of the times (baseball, football, basketball), and several minor games.

Concurrent with the activities on the east coast; the first recorded games involving High School, school sponsored teams in the Dallas Texas area occurred in 1900. St. Matthew’s grammar school of Dallas played the Wall School of Honey Grove, found in Fannin County just south of the Texas-Oklahoma border, on Oct. 12, 1900, as a prelude to the intercollegiate level Texas-Vanderbilt game the same day. Honey Grove won 5-0. The event was a milestone in Texas history: the first recorded interscholastic football game between two high-school teams.

The Wall school was founded in 1898 by Simon Venable Wall, who moved to Honey Grove from Franklin, Tenn. Accounts of the school’s history noted its football team frequently played two games a day and that it was not uncommon for the team to catch a train on weekends and play in area towns. Austin College, in nearby Sherman, was a frequent opponent for the Wall boys.

Until the formation of interscholastic programs and games such as the one in Dallas Texas, most American boys had played football in the haphazard way of boys the world over: ambling onto fields and into alleys for pickup games or challenging other loosely affiliated groups of students to a match. Cheating was rampant, and games looked more like brawls than organized contests.

By 1910, 17 other cities across the United States had formed their own competitive athletic leagues modeled after New York City’s PSAL. Physical education reformers in the high schools followed the colleges in taking over sports programs with the catchphrase “Athletics are educational.” Their reform was tied to the overall reform in American education and overall reform in American society during the Progressive Era.

The establishment of leagues and state associations by educators in the years after 1900 bringing about institutional control over interscholastic sports was neither seamless nor uniform across the nation nor the western region of the US to include Texas, New Mexico, Arizona and California.

In most areas of the country, educator-sponsored high school leagues were formed in most big cities and in many rural areas, usually two ways, from whole cloth or by taking over existing student-run or joint student-faculty-run leagues. In many areas, especially rural areas like most of Texas and New Mexico there were few leagues, and only gradually did league formation spread nationwide.

Settlement houses and ethnic clubs soon followed suit. The number of these boys’ clubs grew rapidly through the 1920s, working in parallel with school leagues.

In 1914 the first organized events for school children were held and 2040 boys competed for the City Championships Track and Field held at Madison Square Gardens. Events at this event included standing long jump, chinning the bar, running sprints, disc throwing, relays and hurdles. (Today competing at Madison Square Garden in Track & Field is considered hallowed grounds by many a Track & Field athlete.) By 1915 177 school systems around the country had formed competitive leagues.

By 1916, the United States was starting to educate its children for more years than most other countries, even while admitting a surge of immigrants. The ruling elite feared that all this schooling would make Anglo-Saxon boys soft and weak, in contrast to their brawny, newly immigrated peers. Oliver Wendell Holmes Sr. warned that cities were being overrun with “stiff-jointed, soft-muscled, paste-complexioned youth.”

Sports, the thinking went, would both protect boys’ masculinity and distract them from vices like gambling and prostitution. “Muscular Christianity,” fashionable during the Victorian era, prescribed sports as a sort of moral vaccine against the tumult of rapid economic growth. “In life, as in a football game,” Theodore Roosevelt wrote in an essay on “The American Boy” in 1900, “the principle to follow is: Hit the line hard; don’t foul and don’t shirk, but hit the line hard!”

Athletics succeeded in entertaining not just students, but entire communities and local school teams became a sense of pride. As athletic fields became the cultural centers of towns across America, educators became coaches and parents became boosters. Organized sports allowed small towns to compete against large cities in Track & Field, Football and Basketball putting small town schools on the map so to speak with large reputations of athletic excellence.

As the organized school sports programs evolved so did organized fee-based clubs which were more exclusive and not for the poor. Fee-based groups, such as the YMCA, began, but usually only middle-class kids could afford to take part. National pay-to-play organizations, such as Pop Warner Football came into being in 1929.

The National Collegiate Athletic Association had appeared by this time, as a means of reforming the increasingly brutal sport of college football. As the NCAA appeared it began collaboration efforts and recruiting efforts from High Schools for its track & field, football and basketball programs around the country. This partnership ultimately led to scholarship programs and further engrained organized high school sports into the American Experience.

In New Mexico and specifically Alamogordo, following the lead of the nationwide reform of governance in interscholastic sports with the imposition of adult-sponsored leagues and state associations students acquiesced to the new faculty control and passively accepted the new order of things. In many areas, however, educators faced persistent student resistance, stiffened by rebellious high school

Greek-letter societies and continued abuses in the decade leading up to World War I. In Chicago student resistance to control and reform was especially acute.

New Mexico, towns such as Alamogordo and the western states; less resistance existed, as the school systems were newer institutions and did not have the history or mindset of those on the east coast. Progressive politics towards education and athletics prevailed without institutional histories, politics and interests fighting for dominance.

Alamogordo High School began an organized sports program in 1912 for Caucasian boys offering PE, Track & Field and Basketball and Football.

In 1913, the authorities of the University of New Mexico believing that one of the great needs of the High Schools of the state was an opportunity to meet, at least once a year in athletic and other contests, organized the University of New Mexico Track Athletic Association. A track meet was held in the spring of that year at Albuquerque, and two high schools, Santa Fe and Albuquerque contested for the banner.

Although the beginning was small, a great deal of interest from across the state was aroused. Seven state high schools competed in the next meet when the Spalding Trophy was awarded for the first time for the winning High School Track & Field Team. After that, the number of competing schools grew.

At the time of the meeting of the Educational Association of Albuquerque in November 1915, the New Mexico High School Athletic Association was formed, and the 1916 meet was held under the joint auspices of this association and the University of New Mexico. Alamogordo was represented at that 1916 meet. A new feature of that event was a basketball tournament which was added, and the meet was the most successful of the series to date.

The yearly function was a big deal toward the standardization and unification of consistent athletic standards around the state, and in bringing high schools into a closer and more cordial relationship though they were athletic competitors.

Because of the success of that meet at the annual meeting of the New Mexico Athletic Association in Santa Fe, November 29th, 1916 an agreement was made whereby the athletic and oratorical associations would merge and become united under one set of officers or board of directors as the New Mexico High School Athlete & Lyceum Association.

Alamogordo High School won its first state medals in 1916/17 School Year and they were in Track and Field via the High Jump and the Triple Jump.

This first state competition was held by the New Mexico High School Athletic and Lyceum Association.

This first New Mexico Interscholastic Competition for which Alamogordo took part consisted of three areas of competition…

  • The Basketball Tournament – (Boys Only)
  • The Track and Field Meet and included: (Boys Only)
  • Running 100 Yard Run
  • Putting 12 Pound Shot
  • Half Mile Run
  • Pole Vault
  • 120 Yards Hurdle
  • Running High Jump
  • 440 Yards Run
  • Running Broad Jump
  • 220 Yard Hurdle
  • Running Hop, Step &Jump
  • 220 Yards Run
  • 1 Mile Run
  • 1 Mile Relay Run between 4 men ¼ mile each
  • The Oratorical & Declamatory Contest (Boys Oratorical, Girl Declamatory)

The very first state medal winner in 1917 for an athlete from Alamogordo High School was named Wohlenberg who scored a 5 foot 7.75 inches and New Mexico State Medalist in High Jump.

Also, in 1916/17 Alamogordo High School won the Triple Jump with an athlete named Saulsberry winning the state at 40 feet 5 inchesThese two state interscholastic medal wins were the first state medal wins in statewide competition for Alamogordo High School.

In 1921 The New Mexico Activities Association (NMAA) was formed as a nonprofit organization that regulates interscholastic programs for junior and senior high schools in New Mexico. It became the official host and record keeper for the statewide sports championship games each year thereafter and collaborated with the University of New Mexico to continue to host events. It is the organization that continues the tradition of record keeping and leading interscholastic events within New Mexico today.

NMAA was organized in 1921 by John Milne, James Bickley, F. H. Lynn, and J.D. Shinkle as the New Mexico High School Athletic Association. In 1953 it began adding non-athletic activities and changed its name to New Mexico High School Activities Association. It continued to broaden its coverage and in 1961 changed its name to the present New Mexico Activities Association. The Hall of Pride and Honor was opened in 1992.

The NMAA continues into this century and has adapted along the way.

This year the NMAA has been a strong advocate for student athletes and ensuring safety precautions are in place to again allow student athletes to compete in the post Covid-19 environment leading the way with adaptive processes, modified schedules and still hosting district and state level competitions.

Additionally the NMAA is providing student athletes and those involved in extracurricular activities the opportunities for scholarships and the level of attention necessary to garner opportunities for the students it serves in preparation for entry to the college and university environments.

Future articles and podcasts will carry the reader and listener further into the history, discuss the racial tensions and solutions that evolved in the 50s and beyond and the the launch of Title IX and girls interscholastic sports. All along the way we will highlight stories of some of the athletes and coaches that were of interest to the history books of interscholastic sports in Alamogordo, New Mexico and across the USA.

To learn more or to see photos online from the 50’s, 60s, 70s, 80’s and beyond of the Alamogordo High School athletics programs visit

https://2ndlifemedia.com/coach-bob-sepulveda-books

1917 First Interscholastic State Meets in New Mexico Program 2nd Life Media Alamogordo Town News Courtesy Coach Bob Sepulveda Book Series1917 First Interscholastic State Meets in New Mexico Program 2nd Life Media Alamogordo Town News Courtesy Coach Bob Sepulveda Book Series1917 First Interscholastic State Meets in New Mexico Records 2nd Life Media Alamogordo Town News Courtesy Coach Bob Sepulveda Book Series1917 First Interscholastic State Meets in New Mexico Program 2nd Life Media Alamogordo Town News Courtesy Coach Bob Sepulveda Book Series1917 First Interscholastic State Meets in New Mexico Program 2nd Life Media Alamogordo Town News Courtesy Coach Bob Sepulveda Book Series1917 First Interscholastic State Meets in New Mexico Records 2nd Life Media Alamogordo Town News Courtesy Coach Bob Sepulveda Book Series1917 First Interscholastic State Meets in New Mexico Program 2nd Life Media Alamogordo Town News Courtesy Coach Bob Sepulveda Book SeriesPreviousNext

STAY CONNECTED! SUBSCRIBE TO FREE EMAIL UPDATES FROM 2ND LIFE MEDIA ALAMOGORDO

SIGN UP!

https://2ndlifemediaalamogordo.town.news/g/alamogordo-nm/n/27158/history-1920s-rise-high-school-athletics-associations-founding-new-mexico

Daily Affirmation for 4/9/2021 – 28 Days A Habit, 90 Days A Lifestyle Author Chris Edwards

As we remind our readers, podcast listeners and partners daily concerning our affirmations; a habit is “a settled or regular tendency or practice, especially one that is hard to give up.” Habits become a lifestyle a “glass half full” mindset becomes a lifestyle and that leads to permanent results. Science and real-world experience tell us that it actually takes a minimum of 28 days to begin to form a habit, but on average its really between 60 to 90 days. For most of us 90 days is a much more effective and realistic timeframe to incorporate a new behavior into our life, thus 90 Days To A Glass Half Full Lifestyle.

Our Daily Action Steps Are To:

  • Commit to taking 5 minutes each morning as you begin your day to read the daily quote.
  • If you are moved or inspired by the quote; share it in an email, phone call, conversation, text, tweet or on your social media network or platform. When we share something, it becomes more real to us.
  • In your own words write in this book how the quote or thought applies to you or your circumstances, today. If it doesn’t write on your page the first thing that comes into your mind after reading the quote.
  • The end of the day, prior to bed, take 5 more minutes for yourself. Re-read the quote again and write or think of how you applied or took an action today with a person, situation or referenced the daily quote in mind. Reflect on the day, was there any event in the day where your thinking was impacted differently because of the quote or the affirmation.
  • Let’s have fun with the system and commit.
  • Now, Let’s begin with today’s affirmation:

“Are you having a rough morning or day? Place your hand on your heart. Feel that? That is called PURPOSE. You are alive for a reason. Don’t give up.” – Chris Edwards

As we begin today: Take a moment and think how’s the above quote apply to me or what comes to mind when reading or hearing the quote? Again the quote is: “Are you having a rough morning or day? Place your hand on your heart. Feel that? That is called PURPOSE. You are alive for a reason. Don’t give up.”

As we end our day: Re-read the quote and ask yourself, did I share the quote or apply any of its meaning into any part of my day? What issue or situation made me think of or refer to the quote or affirmation of today? Did it help me bridge a positive outcome or mindset? Did I find my purpose for today?

We encourage you to write or journal your thoughts or reflections on todays quote. It’s your life, express yourself as your true and honest self and let’s work together for self improvement and a Glass Half Full mindset.

Author Chris Edwards lectures, has his podcast and writes. His book series 90 Days to a Glass Half Full Lifestyle is 3 part series that garnered much acclaim from many coming out of rehab and those coming out of incarceration and beginning anew. His other book series, book 1 Coach Bob Sepulveda The Early Days is an inspirational sport history of interscholastic sports in New Mexico. All of his books are found at fine independent book sellers such as Roadrunner Emporium, 928 New York Avenue, Alamogordo, New Mexico and available via Amazon in 36 countries. Alamogordo Girls Track Team in 1979 Showing “Purpose” At the State Track Meet Photo Courtesy Marilyn Sepulveda Collection 2nd Life Media Alamogordo Town News

STAY CONNECTED! SUBSCRIBE TO FREE EMAIL UPDATES FROM 2ND LIFE MEDIA ALAMOGORDO

SIGN UP!

Positive News – Daily Affirmation: 28 Days A Habit, 90 Days A Lifestyle 90 Days to a Glass Half Full Lifestyle

28 Days A Habit, 90 Days A Lifestyle 90 Days to a Glass Half Full Lifestyle

In my book series and lectures on the national circuit, on past blog post and podcasts, I’ve recapped how we started the day when I led a group of 30 ladies out of incarceration into professional corporate leadership roles with a quote or affirmation email and how it became a part of our daily routine. This lesson and those that continue is an act of love to carry that routine further, to a broader audience and to help others discover a pathway to A Glass Half Full Lifestyle.

Social Science and Psychology teach us, that is generally takes 28 days to change a habit. This theory is reinforced by those that have been through a 28 Day program of recovery from addictions or other issues. 28 Days of consciously trying to make change helps lead to permanent change by deliberately focuses on changes we wish to make. After the 4 weeks are up less effort is needed to sustain it.

“We are what we repeatedly do.

Therefore, excellence is not an act, but a habit.”

– Aristotle

A definition of a habit is “a settled or regular tendency or practice, especially one that is hard to give up.” Habits become a lifestyle a “glass half full” mindset becomes a lifestyle and that leads to permanent results. Science and real-world experience tell us that it actually takes a minimum of 28 days to begin to form a habit, but on average its really between 60 to 90 days. For most of us 90 days is a much more effective and realistic timeframe to incorporate a new behavior into our life, thus 90 Days To A Glass Half Full Lifestyle.

What follows as we move forward are daily affirmations, quotes, or thoughts to start the day and each day for the next 90 days we will continue that path with one posted.

The thesis behind this self help series is to commit to a program of positive reinforcement and to get into a habit of viewing people and situations through a glass is half full lens or mentality.

This is a working system to use. Contrary to how we were raised, I want you to write your thoughts rather its on scrape paper a journal or a notebook. Writing helps one to commit. If you are driving and listening to this as a Podcast repeat the affirmations 3 times to better commit to them and then later in the day write them down and make notes, make it sloppy and use it for personal growth.

To reinforce your experience some people find it makes it more real or tangible to share their experiences, thoughts, or their journey.

Feel free to write in a journal or share the experience of your journey in social media or to blog it. (If blogging or sharing personal thoughts, attach hashtag #90dayshalffull. We also want hear about your experience or email us or comment on any of our various sites where we post and teach).

Some people are more private and don’t want to share. Either is great, it is your journey, just commit and enjoy it.

Action Steps

  • Commit to taking 5 minutes each morning as you begin your day to read the daily quote.
  • If you are moved or inspired by the quote; share it in an email, phone call, conversation, text, tweet or on your social media network or platform. When we share something, it becomes more real to us.
  • In your own words write in this book how the quote or thought applies to you or your circumstances, today. If it doesn’t write on your page the first thing that comes into your mind after reading the quote.
  • The end of the day, prior to bed, take 5 more minutes for yourself. Re-read the quote again and write or think of how you applied or took an action today with a person, situation or referenced the daily quote in mind. Reflect on the day, was there any event in the day where your thinking was impacted differently because of the quote or the affirmation.
  • Let’s have fun with the system and commit.
  • Now, Let’s begin with todays quote and action steps…

“Every morning we get a chance to be different. A chance to change. A Chance to be better. Your past is your past. Leave it there.”

Beginning of Day: How’s the above quote apply to me or what comes to mind when reading the quote above?

End of day: Re-read the quote. Did I share the quote or apply any of its meaning into any part of my day? What issue or situation made me think of or refer to the quote above? Did it help me bridge a positive outcome or mindset?

Write or journal your thoughts or reflections on todays quote. It’s your life, express yourself as your true and honest self and let’s work together for self improvement.

STAY CONNECTED! SUBSCRIBE TO FREE EMAIL UPDATES FROM 2ND LIFE MEDIA ALAMOGORDO

SIGN UP!

https://2ndlifemediaalamogordo.town.news/g/alamogordo-nm/n/27046/positive-news-daily-affirmation-28-days-habit-90-days-lifestyle-90-days

History and A Spotlight on Women’s Entrepreneurship – New Mexico Leads the Nation-Author & Positivity Coach Chris Edwards

A spotlight on women’s entrepreneurship and the changes in business over the last several decades nationally, in New Mexico and in Alamogordo.

Per Wendy Diamond who is CEO and Founder of Women’s Entrepreneurship Day Organization“Today, women account for 85 percent of consumer purchases and control $20 trillion in global spending. At the same time, they perform 66 percent of the world’s work (both paid and unpaid) yet only earn 10 percent of the world’s income. In the U.S., there are approximately 10 M woman-owned businesses, generating $1.3T in revenue and employing 7.8 M people. This number is expected to increase by 90 percent in the next five years, with 500,000 new businesses being created each year in the U.S. alone. At the same time, 1 in 3 women in America lives in poverty and of the 1.3M people living in severe poverty globally, 70 percent are women and girls.

Women in developed and developing nations alike are becoming increasingly active participants in local and global economies at a rapid rate. Today, in the United States, 38% of new businesses are founded by women, but only between 2-6% of them receive VC funding. One recent survey of 350 woman-owned tech startups revealed that 80% of founders used their own savings to launch their businesses. At the same time, an increase of women in leadership positions from zero to just 30% is associated with a 15% increase in profitability. Women are the world’s most responsible borrowers, paying back microloans worldwide today at a 97% rate of return. 90% of the money they earn is used to educate their children and to provide for their families.”

Terry Powell ofForbes Coaches Council reports, “In 1972, women-owned businesses represented just 4.6% of all businesses, but today, that number has skyrocketed to 42%, according to a 2019 American Express report.”

With the world of Covid-19 small businesses and female owned businesses took a huge hit. However research is showing female owned businesses are bouncing back and were quicker to adapt to the changes in the market.

Today more than 11.6 million businesses are owned by American women. That’s according to the National Association of Women Business Owners. Those firms employ almost 9 million people and, generate around $1.7 trillion in sales.

In 2019, 1,817 new women-owned businesses were created every day in America. While we don’t yet know how many women-owned businesses were formed during the Covid-19 pandemic yet, it seems likely that the numbers continued to increase. Some evidence suggests that far more startups were created than usual; applications for employer identification numbers, a sign that new people are starting companies, also increased.

Women are increasingly turning to franchises as a way to start a business. It has become commonplace for women to be interested in buying a franchise. Women own or co-own about 265,000 franchises, which is about 35% of all U.S. franchises. That’s about a 24% rise from ten years ago.

Female Entrepreneurship and empowerment is not just limited to business in New Mexico it began in government and led to leadership in business.

In New Mexico, women have broken glass ceilings throughout history. Women have served in elected office since before statehood: The first Hispanic female legislators in the United States served in New Mexico’s territorial legislature in 1895. Soledad Chávez Chacón was elected secretary of state in 1922 and was the first woman to serve as acting governor in the United States. Following statehood in 1912, Fedelina Gallegos and Porfirria Hidalgo Saiz, who both served in the New Mexico Legislature from 1931 to 1932, were the first Hispanic women state legislators in the United States.

New Mexican women continue to be history makers and influencers. According to Rutgers University’s Center for American Women and Politics, two of the three women of color who have been elected governor are from New Mexico, including our current governor, Michelle Lujan Grisham. U.S. Rep. Deb Haaland, D-N.M., is one of two Native women to ever be elected to Congress and is now the first Native American to be named to the Cabinet Post as the Secretary of the Department of the Interior.

There have been recent leaps in women’s representation in the Legislature — 35 percent of the state legislators are women and nearly 50 percent of the New Mexico House members are women.

New Mexican women have held commanding roles in other sectors, too. New Mexico ranks first in the nation for female-owned businesses, with nearly 52 percent of New Mexico businesses owned or co-owned by women, in comparison to the national rate of 42 percent.

Within Alamogordo in 1997 only 29.1% of the businesses registered were female owned, more recently that number of female owned verses male owned or public companies has elevated to 41.4%. Still lagging the state average and more inline with the national average. The number shows progress but also shows the city, county and state can do better in partnering and fostering growth and support of female entrepreneurship.

Alamogordo is in a transitional state. There are 1000s of square feet of retail space that is vacant, yet there was a recent upgrade to White Sands National Monument to National Park Status. Now is the opportunity as the city and region comes out of a Covid-19 dark winter to bring some light, to work with women, POC and the minorities communities to expand the business community and bring about a huge economic turnaround to the city, state, region and nation.

Our congressional leaders, state, county and city government leaders must partner with the business community to nurture women into business within Alamogordo and Southern New Mexico.

The goal of the women entrepreneurship education and training should be to:
• Empower women through entrepreneurship to enable them achieve economic self –
sufficiency;
• To help women gain strong business and life management skills that will enable
them to become leaders in their work and personal lives, and become strong role
models;
• To spur the growth of locally controlled business and create new jobs within
neighborhood;
• To provide business experience;
• To promote entrepreneurship by emphasizing the importance of small business as
the creator of jobs, leading to prosperity;
• To enable to potential entrepreneurs to emerge by assisting them in evaluating
their training program;
• To encourage business start-ups by offering a comprehensive entrepreneurship their
training program;
• To develop new markets and help mobilize the capital resources needed; and
• To introduce new technology, industries and products and to create new
employment opportunities.

Entrepreneurship among women, no doubt improves the wealth of the city, state and nation in
general and of the family in particular. Women today are more willing to take up activities
that were once considered the preserve of men, and have proved that they are second to
no one with respect to contribution to the growth of the economy. November 19th is Women’s Entrepreneurship Day; today, as we begin the Spring and awaken from the Covid-19 Winter, let’s each in a position of responsibility commit to mentor, encourage, support and empower more females into business leadership and business ownership and then on November 19th reflect on the good opportunities this partnership led to and the prosperity that will soon follow.

https://2ndlifemediaalamogordo.town.news/g/alamogordo-nm/n/26999/history-and-spotlight-womens-entrepreneurship-new-mexico-leads-nation

STAY CONNECTED! SUBSCRIBE TO FREE EMAIL UPDATES FROM 2ND LIFE MEDIA ALAMOGORDO

SIGN UP!

https://2ndlifemediaalamogordo.town.news/g/alamogordo-nm/n/26999/history-and-spotlight-womens-entrepreneurship-new-mexico-leads-nation

The Journey Toward Positivity The Power of The Possible by Author & Positivity Coach: Chris Edwards

“The Journey toward positivity. Don’t expect everyone to understand your journey, especially if they have never walled in your path. Learn, grow and find your own POWER of the POSSIBLE with each New Day.” Quote by Author & Positivity Coach, Chris Edwards from his book 90 Days to a Glass Half Full Life Style. Lessons for positivity excerpt: 

“Our lives are a journey. The journey we take can lead to periods of great joy and amazing experiences. A life lived in full also can lead us onto pathways and encounters that are not pleasant and can lead to memories that can be painful and may take one into darkness and despair.

A life in full follows a variety of paths. How we react to those circumstances both joyous and painful is what defines our character and our legacy. Our legacy is our footprint on the pathway of life imprinted for future generations.

Our reactions to situations and people and our actions daily impact those around us; friends, family, love ones, enemies, acquaintances, co-workers, social media followers and strangers we may not be even aware of.

Our perspective of how we manage ourselves and the stresses of daily life ultimately manifest into who we are and who we become. In reality we are subjective creatures of life. We see our daily circumstance through a filter of self-perceptions. We have biases, prejudices and opinions formed from our environment, our circumstances, and our histories. Those biases, prejudices, opinions, or experiences do not have to determine our lot in life. We have the power of positive self -determination if we just embrace what is truly within each of us.

Everyone has a personality; good, bad, indifferent, engaged, disengaged, introverted, extroverted, consistent, and calm and or extreme. That personality or mindset and the control of how we manifest our histories and experiences internally can alter our perceptions and our reactions to others, our surroundings, and events around us.

We each see life differently and through the lens of our experiences…

  • ● Introverts see things differently than do extraverts.
  • ● Pessimists have a different take on life than optimists.
  • ● If one has a leaning toward depression, then the sense of our past experienced events can take on a very gray, black, or very dark sheen when sizing up or reacting to people or events in the present.
  • ● If our personality is anxious, everything hits us at a higher speed and possibly a more dramatic impact.
  • ● If we are passive or we just look at events and perceive it as just fate; then we may manifest thoughts of what happens just happens, it’s out of my control or my ability to manage or comprehend. We may just shut down or cut off engagement with people or events around us.

If we approach the daily events in our life with positivity, we then look at a glass as half full and don’t allow situations or others to negatively impact us or allow ourselves to feel totally out of control.

We may not control the person or event before us, but we can control how we approach a situation, how we react externally by how we control our own internal thinking. Negative energy and negative thoughts create negative responses and create dread, negativity, sickness. Negativity can eventually destroy us and our relationships with those around us.

When we take “a glass is half full” more positive approach, then anything or anyone put in our pathway is positioned as not so traumatic or dramatic. With the process of positivity, we can approach situations with a more calming mindset and actually think through a reaction or response in a calm, civil and thoughtful way.

A glass is half full mindset allows us to step back for a moment and look for positive inspiration in most any situation, person, or event. Breath seek positivity and move forward. Discrete daily affirmations or inspirations carry us forward and to not allow the darkness to enter our minds, hearts, or souls.

With daily affirmations, we decide how we feel and don’t allow others or circumstances to drive our feelings, beliefs, attitudes, or emotions. With a glass half full mindset, we control our minds then, our reactions and we are better equipped to manage the person, event or situations more rationally, more poised and more affirmatively than we might have otherwise.

Let’s get started, now this moment today to find the pathway to positivity!”

Next steps and affirmations to the path of positivity will appear in future stories, posts and podcasts

Stay Tuned on Alamogordo Town News, Author Chris Edwards Blog, Via Podcasts and on the 2nd Life Media You Tube Channel.

This story was excerpted fromAuthor & Positivity Coach Chris Edwards Book Series 90 Days to a Glass Half Full Lifestyle found a fine independent book sellers such as Roadrunner Emporium, 928 New York Avenue, Alamogordo, New Mexico and also available in 36 countries and throughout the US via Amazon.

Follow the podcasts of Author Chris Edwards, Fitness Tips and Artistic updates from former NCAA Fitness Coach, Author and Artist Rene Sepulveda and the other 2nd Life Media affiliated partners at 2nd Life Media on SpotifyGoogle Podcast and Anchor Podcast by Spotify

STAY CONNECTED! SUBSCRIBE TO FREE EMAIL UPDATES FROM 2ND LIFE MEDIA ALAMOGORDO

SIGN UP!

New Mexico History- The Founding of Alamogordo and the evolution of High School Athletics 1912- 1950’s.

Alamogordo, (Alamogordo means “fat cottonwood.” Gordo = fat; alamo = poplar or cottonwood), New Mexico founded in 1898 embraced education and the idea of interscholastic sports with an open mind for one selected group.

In 1898 Alamogordo was split into two cities: Alamogordo a primarily Caucasian enclave and Chihuahua a primarily Mexican/Latin American enclave. The two were merged in 1912 and became the incorporated city of Alamogordo, New Mexico.

Alamogordo is in the Tularosa Basin of the Chihuahua Desert, it is bordered on the east by the Sacramento Mountains and to the west by Holloman Air Force Base. Alamogordo in modern times is known for its connection with the Trinity test, the first explosion of an atomic bomb.

Alamogordo was founded as a company town to support the building of the El Paso and Northeastern Railroad, a part of the transcontinental railway that was being constructed in the late 19th century.

Initially its main industry was timbering for railroad ties. The railroad founders were also eager to find a major town that would persist after the railroad was completed; they formed the Alamogordo Improvement Company to develop the area, making Alamogordo an early example of a planned community. The Alamogordo Improvement Company owned all the land, platted the streets, built the first houses and commercial buildings, donated land for a college, and placed a restrictive covenant on each deed prohibiting the manufacture, distribution, or sale of intoxicating liquor. Education was a priority and the city founders, Charles Eddy and brother, John Arthur Eddy. The brothers were both strong willed, and constantly battled over the decisions that had to be made. Ultimately, they agreed that interscholastic sports and a strong educational foundation as part of the progressive educational movement of the time would fuel the business interest they were developing.

Tourism became an important part of the local economy from the creation of White Sands National Monument in 1934.

Local businessperson Tom Charles, grandfather of the 1950’s Alamogordo High School Women’s PE Coach Margaret “Markie” Rutz, was instrumental in pushing for recognition of White Sands as a National Monument and eventual National Park.

Local Construction began on the Alamogordo Army Airfield (the present-day Holloman Air Force Base) in 1942, and the Federal government has been a strong presence in Alamogordo ever since.

Education has also been an important part of the local economy. In addition to the local school system, Alamogordo is home to the New Mexico School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, founded in 1903, and a branch of New Mexico State University founded in 1958.

Holloman Air Force Base, found approximately 3 miles (4.8 km) west of the city limits, is the largest employer of Alamogordo residents, and has a major effect on the local economy. According to some estimates, Holloman accounts for half of the Alamogordo economy today. The military influence has had a major impact on the diversity and quality of students and athletes that were available to take part in Alamogordo athletic programs for several generations.

According to the 49th Fighter Wing Public Affairs office, as of January 2008 Holloman directly employs 6,111 personnel with a gross payroll of $266 million. It indirectly creates another 2,047 jobs with a payroll of $77 million. The estimated amount spent in the community is $482 million. The influence of the military has had a historical impact on the politics around athletics and other public- school programs since the 1950’s.

An estimated 6,700 military retirees now live in the area. There are 1,383 active military and 1,641 military dependents living on base and 2,765 active military and 2,942 military dependents living off base.

A blow to the economy and to the sports programs at Alamogordo High School came when after 27 years of training at Holloman, the German Air Force left in 2019. They moved their pilot training to Sheppard Air Force Base in Texas.

The region peaked in business interests and the regional brains trust in the 1960s with many industries from Levi’s to Space Contractors having offices in the city. The city and region had one of the highest concentrations of space and rocket engineers, scientists and high-tech leaders in the nation for a city its size. The result of this concentration of people helped create a large high school talent pool which aided in athletic and academic success of Alamogordo High School ranking it the 3rd best in the nation during the 1960s.

Due to the concentration of space and military contracts the city and region integrated earlier than many, as being the first in the state. Alamogordo High School set a national example in education and sports, unusual for a city its size. Public education began in Alamogordo in 1898 via a tent city. The tent was used for court on one end, with school on the other end. When court was in session there was no school to attend. During this time, Alamogordo was primarily a tent city and most of the residents were tuberculosis patients.

In 1900, a two-story brick school was built which had six classrooms. This was named the East Building. An additional two-story brick building was then added in 1910, having eight classrooms. It became the Central Building. Alamogordo High School, a two-story brick building with 13 classrooms and a multi-use auditorium was constructed in 1910 and launched an organized athletic program around 1912.

Meanwhile in other parts of the country more developed than Alamogordo New Mexico, construction of gymnasiums in the high schools became a priority in school development and laid the foundation for the development of indoor sports, particularly basketball and Track & Field activities such as jumps and sprints. Educators by this time saw physical education as intrinsic to the development of American high school youth. Gymnasiums were originally designed for gymnastics and calisthenics instruction, but boys organized games soon took more and more time on the floor space, as educators saw that they had value in their educational mission. Although indoor baseball was played in some high school gymnasiums on the east coast, participants usually searched for larger facilities, such as armories. Eventually, most colleges and many high schools-built gymnasiums with the support and endorsement of business leaders and progressive politicians.

Back in Alamogordo, Dudley School was built in 1914 and had four classrooms. Dudley School was set up as part of a segregation plan at the time and specialized in children that did not speak English being educated in a separate school facility. Hispanics could not go north of 10th Street or into the plaza at the time. The city of Alamogordo, New Mexico with its proximity to Texas was a racially divided city.

Alamogordo High School began an organized sports program in 1912 for Caucasian boys offering PE, Track & Field and Basketball and Football.  The African American School was called the Delaware School and the school that spoke Spanish only was the Dudley School. Athletes from those schools were segregated from the white schools of the time. More on that to follow as we review the 1940’s and 50’s and the cultural shifts that were about to occur in a future story, post or broadcast.

https://2ndlifemediaalamogordo.town.news/g/alamogordo-nm/n/26952/new-mexico-history-founding-alamogordo-and-evolution-high-school-athletics

A History Lesson for Southern New Mexico – The creation of Interscholastic (Organized High School Sports) in the US and New Mexico and Alamogordo High School 1916


https://2ndlifemediaalamogordo.town.news/g/alamogordo-nm/n/26908/history-alamogordo-high-1916-and-creation-interscholastic-high-school

How did High School Sports get started in the US, Southern New Mexico and Alamogordo and when?

Interscholastic Sports at the High School level via organized physical education programs did not begin in the US until around 1903 but had roots dating to the 1880s. Organized sports began with economically challenged or lower-class children competing under non-parental adult supervision, while their upper- class counterparts participated in non- competitive activities like dancing and music lessons, often in their homes. Children’s tournaments, especially athletic ones, came first to economically challenged children, most often immigrants living in large urban areas or the larger US cities.

Massachusetts was the first state to make schooling compulsory in 1852. It was not until 1917 that the final state of the union at the time, Mississippi, passed a similar law.

While on the east coast the focus was on social progress, education and organized school sports programs; the wild west was playing catch up.

New cities like Alamogordo, New Mexico founded 1898 were creating new opportunities for Americans and America’s youth. January 6, 1912, New Mexico was admitted into the United States union as the 47th state. With that our history of interscholastic High School Athletics Track & Field in Alamogordo soon begins. New Mexico, even while a territory, took a progressive view to public education and made public education compulsory in urban areas in 1891. It became compulsory everywhere by the time New Mexico became a state in 1912.

With the institution of mandatory schooling in New Mexico and in most states, children and families experienced a profound shift in the structure of their daily lives, especially in the social organization of their time. This change in social view resulted in thinking about how to challenge a child and occupy his day especially in urban areas.

The answer lay partly in competitive sports leagues, which started to evolve to hold the interest of children. Urban reformers were particularly preoccupied with poor low skilled economically and socially challenged immigrants who, because of overcrowding in tenements or inner cities, were often on the streets. Initial organization efforts focused on the establishment of city parks and playgrounds. Powerful, organized playground movements developed in New York City and Boston. But because adults did not trust boys, especially immigrant boys, to play unsupervised without significant issues, attention soon shifted to organized sports. Sports were important in teaching immigrants and those economically challenged and from rural areas; the “American values of cooperation, hard work, and respect for authority.”

According to historian Robert Halpern, “progressive reformers thought athletic activities could prepare children especially boys for the new industrial society that was emerging, which would require them to be physical laborers.” There was a distinct business interest in organized youth sports early on, to ensure a robust and healthy workforce for an economy changing from, rural based to urban based, in the decades to follow.

Organized youth groups backed by the influence of business interests took on the responsibility of providing children with sports activities. In 1903, New York City’s Public-School Athletic League for Boys was established by Luther Gulick, and formal contests between children, organized by adults, emerged to keep the boys coming back to school. Formal competition ensured the boys’ continued participation since they wanted to defend their school team’s record and honor. The purpose per the PSLA was to encourage a healthy, strong body and mind through competitive exercises.

The PSAL initially conducted “class athletics” in grades five through eight at specific times each year, not interschool competition as it is known today. Class athletics included seasonal track and field events. PSAL’s also emphasized swimming, popular sports of the times (baseball, football, basketball), and several minor games.

Concurrent with the activities on the east coast; the first recorded games involving High School, school sponsored teams in the Dallas Texas area occurred in 1900. St. Matthew’s grammar school of Dallas played the Wall School of Honey Grove, found in Fannin County just south of the Texas-Oklahoma border, on Oct. 12, 1900, as a prelude to the intercollegiate level Texas-Vanderbilt game the same day. Honey Grove won 5-0. The event was a milestone in Texas history: the first recorded interscholastic football game between two high-school teams.

The Wall school was founded in 1898 by Simon Venable Wall, who moved to Honey Grove from Franklin, Tenn. Accounts of the school’s history noted its football team frequently played two games a day and that it was not uncommon for the team to catch a train on weekends and play in area towns. Austin College, in nearby Sherman, was a frequent opponent for the Wall boys.

Until the formation of interscholastic programs and games such as the one in Dallas Texas, most American boys had played football in the haphazard way of boys the world over: ambling onto fields and into alleys for pickup games or challenging other loosely affiliated groups of students to a match. Cheating was rampant, and games looked more like brawls than organized contests.

By 1910, 17 other cities across the United States had formed their own competitive athletic leagues modeled after New York City’s PSAL. Physical education reformers in the high schools followed the colleges in taking over sports programs with the catchphrase “Athletics are educational.” Their reform was tied to the overall reform in American education and overall reform in American society during the Progressive Era.

The establishment of leagues and state associations by educators in the years after 1900 bringing about institutional control over interscholastic sports was neither seamless nor uniform across the nation nor the western region of the US to include Texas, New Mexico, Arizona and California.

In most areas of the country, educator-sponsored high school leagues were formed in most big cities and in many rural areas, usually two ways, from whole cloth or by taking over existing student-run or joint student-faculty-run leagues. In many areas, especially rural areas like most of Texas and New Mexico there were few leagues, and only gradually did league formation spread nationwide.

Settlement houses and ethnic clubs soon followed suit. The number of these boys’ clubs grew rapidly through the 1920s, working in parallel with school leagues.

In 1914 the first organized events for school children were held and 2040 boys competed for the City Championships Track and Field held at Madison Square Gardens. Events at this event included standing long jump, chinning the bar, running sprints, disc throwing, relays and hurdles. (Today competing at Madison Square Garden in Track & Field is considered hallowed grounds by many a Track & Field athlete.) By 1915 177 school systems around the country had formed competitive leagues.

By 1916, the United States was starting to educate its children for more years than most other countries, even while admitting a surge of immigrants. The ruling elite feared that all this schooling would make Anglo-Saxon boys soft and weak, in contrast to their brawny, newly immigrated peers. Oliver Wendell Holmes Sr. warned that cities were being overrun with “stiff-jointed, soft-muscled, paste-complexioned youth.”

Sports, the thinking went, would both protect boys’ masculinity and distract them from vices like gambling and prostitution. “Muscular Christianity,” fashionable during the Victorian era, prescribed sports as a sort of moral vaccine against the tumult of rapid economic growth. “In life, as in a football game,” Theodore Roosevelt wrote in an essay on “The American Boy” in 1900, “the principle to follow is: Hit the line hard; don’t foul and don’t shirk, but hit the line hard!”

Athletics succeeded in entertaining not just students, but entire communities and local school teams became a sense of pride. As athletic fields became the cultural centers of towns across America, educators became coaches and parents became boosters. Organized sports allowed small towns to compete against large cities in Track & Field, Football and Basketball putting small town schools on the map so to speak with large reputations of athletic excellence.

As the organized school sports programs evolved so did organized fee-based clubs which were more exclusive and not for the poor. Fee-based groups, such as the YMCA, began, but usually only middle-class kids could afford to take part. National pay-to-play organizations, such as Pop Warner Football came into being in 1929.

The National Collegiate Athletic Association had appeared by this time, as a means of reforming the increasingly brutal sport of college football. As the NCAA appeared it began collaboration efforts and recruiting efforts from High Schools for its track & field, football and basketball programs around the country. This partnership ultimately led to scholarship programs and further engrained organized high school sports into the American Experience.

In New Mexico and specifically Alamogordo, following the lead of the nationwide reform of governance in interscholastic sports with the imposition of adult-sponsored leagues and state associations students acquiesced to the new faculty control and passively accepted the new order of things. In many areas, however, educators faced persistent student resistance, stiffened by rebellious high school

Greek-letter societies and continued abuses in the decade leading up to World War I. In Chicago student resistance to control and reform was especially acute.

New Mexico, towns such as Alamogordo and the western states; less resistance existed, as the school systems were newer institutions and did not have the history or mindset of those on the east coast. Progressive politics towards education and athletics prevailed without institutional histories, politics and interests fighting for dominance.

Alamogordo, New Mexico An Early Interscholastic Sport Program Adoptee

Alamogordo High School began an organized sports program in 1912 for Caucasian boys offering PE, Track & Field and Basketball and Football.

In 1913, the authorities of the University of New Mexico believing that one of the great needs of the High Schools of the state was an opportunity to meet, at least once a year in athletic and other contests, organized the University of New Mexico Track Athletic Association. A track meet was held in the spring of that year at Albuquerque, and two high schools, Santa Fe and Albuquerque contested for the banner.

Although the beginning was small, a great deal of interest from across the state was aroused.

Alamogordo High School won its first state medals in 1916/17 School Year and they were in Track and Field via the High Jump and the Triple Jump.

Excerpt from Coach Robert Sepulveda The Early Days Book 1 – part of a 3 part book series on Alamogordo Athletics and its history. Available at Roadrunner Emporium, 928 New York Avenue, Alamogordo, New Mexico or on Amazon. 

More historical stories from 1916 and more early history of Alamogordo High will appear in future stores.

To keep the historical sports archives of Alamogordo alive, support local small businesses and  join us as an independent source for positive News and History from Southern New Mexico. Sign up for our Daily News Brief and our blog or advertise with us. To learn more visit

https://2ndlifemediaalamogordo.town.news/g/alamogordo-nm/n/26908/history-alamogordo-high-1916-and-creation-interscholastic-high-school

Photo is of Alamogordo High School 1917

ALAMOGORDO HIGH SCHOOL – ALAMOGORDO, NEW MEXICO In 1917, the architectural firm of Trost & Trost was awarded the contract for the Alamogordo High School. The plans called for the school to be constructed of brick and stone, 90 x 104 feet. The two-story building was to have 13 classrooms and an auditorium. The cost was estimated at $50,000.

The school was completed in 1919 and located on Tenth street (between Michigan and Indiana St.) 

In 1942, the Alamogordo Army Air Field was built 10 miles west of town. The addition of the base caused school enrollment to climb steadily over the next several years. New school buildings were being erected to keep up with the enrollment of new students. The Alamogordo Army Air Field eventually became Holloman Air Force Base and test development center for many government contracts.

In 1970, George Stith and Tom Macklin presented a petition bearing more that 200 names of residents to the Alamogordo City Commission. The petition asked that a study be made on the feasibility of refurbishing the old Alamogordo High School building on Tenth Street and putting it to use as a civic auditorium. The old Alamogordo High School was demolished sometime between 1973 to 1975.

STAY CONNECTED! SUBSCRIBE TO FREE EMAIL UPDATE

https://2ndlifemediaalamogordo.town.news

2ND LIFE MEDIA ALAMOGORDO TOWN NEWS-A Look Back Easter 1921- The Origins of the Easter Bunny

The origins of the Easter Bunny….

The Easter Bunny (also called the Easter Rabbit or Easter Hare) is a folkloric figure and symbol of Easter, depicted as a rabbit bringing Easter eggs. Originating among German Lutherans, the “Easter Hare” originally played the role of a judge, evaluating whether children were good or disobedient in behavior at the start of the season of Eastertide. The Easter Bunny is sometimes depicted with clothes.

In legend, the creature carries colored eggs in his basket, candy, and sometimes also toys to the homes of children, and as such shows similarities to Santa Claus or the 

Christkind, as they both bring gifts to children on the night before their respective holidays.

The custom was first mentioned in Georg Franck von Franckenau‘s De ovis paschalibus (‘About Easter Eggs’) in 1682, referring to a German tradition of an Easter Hare bringing Easter eggs for the children.

The hare was a popular motif in medieval church art. In ancient times, it was widely believed (as by PlinyPlutarchPhilostratus, and Aelian) that the hare was a hermaphrodite. The idea that a hare could reproduce without loss of virginity led to an association with the Virgin Mary, with hares sometimes occurring in illuminated manuscripts and Northern European paintings of the Virgin and Christ Child.

It may also have been associated with the Holy Trinity, as in the three hares motif.

But while the Easter bunny technically isn’t real, the tradition is very much alive, thanks to sneaky parents who have been filling the baskets as a tradition since the founding of America. 

Digging the New Mexico historical archives we see the first references to Easter Egg hunts and the “great Easter Bunny” making a showing in 1921 at the town square and New York Avenue area near the train depot. The first reference to an Easter egg hunt was referenced in a church flyer and a few other archival records.

Memories of early Easter Bunny’s and Easter Egg hunts in Southern New Mexico seem to be fading but one individual interviewed said in the 1950’s the best Egg Hunt and Easter Bunny in the region was always at the Lodge of Cloudcroft followed by a huge picnic around the property with all the women in huge Easter hats and the Best new Spring Dresses.

Enjoy your Easter however you celebrate and Happy Spring!

PreviousNext

STAY CONNECTED! SUBSCRIBE TO FREE EMAIL UPDATES FROM 2ND LIFE MEDIA ALAMOGORDO

SIGN UP!

https://2ndlifemediaalamogordo.town.news/g/alamogordo-nm/n/26889/look-back-alamogordo-easter-1921-origins-easter-bunny

Peanut Butter and Jelly Fun Facts Good News Alert

The National Day Calendar defines April 2, 2021 as National Peanut Butter & Jelly Day. Fun fact the average teenager graduating from Alamogordo High will have consumed 2000 P & J sandwiches by the time they graduate.

https://2ndlifemediaalamogordo.town.news/g/alamogordo-nm/n/26767/alamogordo-good-news-story-april-2-peanut-butter-jelly-day-history-lesson

But how did peanut butter and jelly originate and how did it become so popular as a food staple?

The peanut plant originated in Peru. Peruvians made pottery in the shape of peanuts or decorated jars with peanuts as far back as 3,500 years ago. As early as 1500 B.C., the Incan’s of Peru used peanuts as sacrificial offerings and entombed them with their mummies to aid in the spirit life. Tribes in central Brazil also ground peanuts with maize to make a drink.

Now fast forward about 2000 years and we learn that explorers  from Europe discovered peanuts as far north as Mexico, when the Spanish began their exploration of the new world. The explorers took peanuts back to Spain, and from there traders and explorers spread them to Asia and Africa. Africans were the first people to introduce peanuts to North America beginning in the 1700s.

Records show that it wasn’t until the early 1800s that peanuts were grown as a commercial crop in the United States. They were first grown in Virginia and used mainly for oil, food and as a cocoa substitute. At this time, peanuts were regarded as a food for livestock and the poor and were considered difficult to grow and harvest.

Their popularity grew in the late 1800s when PT Barnum’s circus wagons traveled across the country and vendors called “hot roasted peanuts!” to the crowds. Soon street vendors began selling roasted peanuts from carts and peanuts also became popular at baseball games. While peanut production rose during this time, peanuts were still harvested by hand, leaving stems and trash in the peanuts. Thus, poor quality and lack of uniformity kept down the demand for peanuts.

In the early 1900s peanuts became a significant agricultural crop when the boll weevil threatened the South’s cotton crop. Following the suggestions of noted scientist Dr. George Washington Carver, peanuts served as an effective commercial crop and, for a time, rivaled the position of cotton in the South.

Who invented Peanut Butter?

There is evidence that ancient South American Inca Indians were the first to grind peanuts to make peanut butter. In the United States, Dr. John Harvey Kellogg (of cereal fame) invented a version of peanut butter in 1895. Then it is believed that a St. Louis physician may have developed a version of peanut butter as a protein substitute for his older patients who had poor teeth and couldn’t chew meat. Peanut butter was first introduced at the St. Louis World’s Fair in 1904.

Peanut butter was considered a delicacy in the early 1900s and was only served in New York City’s finest tea rooms. In a May 1896 article published in the Good Housekeeping magazine, a recipe “urged homemakers to use a meat grinder to make peanut butter and spread the result on bread.” That same year, in June, the culinary magazine Table Talk, published a “peanut butter sandwich recipe.”

It is thought that Julia Davis Chandler issued the first reference to peanut butter (or paste) paired with jelly on bread in the United States in 1901. Her article is found in the Boston Cooking School Magazine of Culinary Science and Domestic Economics. In the late 1920s, the price of peanut butter declined, and the sandwich became very popular with children.

Peanuts and peanut butter became an integral part of the Armed Forces rations in World Wars I and II. It is believed that the U.S. army popularized the peanut butter and jelly sandwich for sustenance during maneuvers in World War II.

According to the Peanut Board, during World War II, both peanut butter and jelly were part of the United States soldiers’ military ration list.

In 1968, The J.M. Smucker Co. introduced Goober, a jarred product that combined alternating vertical stripes of peanut butter and jelly.

For 2021 the department of agriculture ranks peanuts as the 12th most valuable cash crop grown in the United States with a farm value of over one billion U.S. dollars.

Peanuts, peanut butter and peanut candy are some of the most popular products in the United States. Americans eat more than six pounds of peanut products each year, worth more than $2 billion at the retail level.

Peanut butter accounts for about half of the U.S. edible use of peanuts—accounting for $850 million in retail sales each year. It is a popular sandwich spread, for children and adults, because it is both nutritious and economical.

The other half of U.S. consumption is divided equally between snack nuts and confectionery. Peanuts are eaten as snack nuts in many ways: roasted in shell, roasted kernels or in mixed nuts. Snack nuts are often salted, spiced or flavored with a variety of coatings.

As far as peanut butter and jelly sandwiches what is the most popular?

In anAsk Your Target Market’s survey on peanut butter and jelly we learn some cool facts…

67% of respondents said that they have a generally positive opinion of peanut butter and jelly sandwiches. In fact, 2% even said they eat them on a daily basis. 13% eat them a few times per week. 10% eat them about once a week. 20% said they enjoy pb&j sandwiches a few times per month. 10% eat them about once a month. 29% said they rarely ever eat them. And 16% never do.

There are, of course, a few different ways people can mix their peanut butter and jelly. But the majority, 55%, said they like when their pb&j has equal parts peanut butter and jelly. 27% like their sandwiches with more peanut butter. 12% like more jelly. And 5% have no preference.

What is our favorite peanut butter brand?

There are even several different choices when it comes to peanut butter. 66% said they prefer creamy peanut butter. 25% like crunchy. 15% like extra crunchy. And 4% have no preference. The most popular peanut butter brands among respondents include Jif, Skippy and Peter Pan.

What jelly do we like with peanut butter?

When it comes to jelly, 45% of respondents said they prefer strawberry jelly on their sandwiches. 42% like grape jelly. 19% prefer raspberry. 11% like other flavors like apple and blackberry. And 7% have no preference. Smuckers was the most popular jelly brand named by respondents. Others include Welch’s, Concord and Kroger brand.

For the full survey results visit: https://aytm.com/surveys/393374/stat/7d6f42738943a1698f70e898ffcc87e5#charts

Sources: www.peanutsusa.com, US Department of Agriculture, Smuckers Inc, National Day Calendar 

https://2ndlifemediaalamogordo.town.news/g/alamogordo-nm/n/26767/alamogordo-good-news-story-april-2-peanut-butter-jelly-day-history-lesson

Author Chris Edwards, 2nd Life Media Alamogordo Daily News and Author of Coach Robert Sepulveda The Early Days Available at Roadrunner Emporium, 928 New York Avenue, Alamogordo, NM or online at Amazon