Where in New Mexico would someone go to see original Root Art, Cholla Desert Cactus Art, Sculptures of Recycled Metals combined with 5000 year old lava rock, original paintings and more? Santa Fe? NO, Alamogordo Of Course! Alamogordo Town News Showcase Roadrunner Emporium Art Gallery…

Where in New Mexico would someone go to see original Root Art, Cholla Desert Cactus Art, Sculptures of Recycled Metals combined with 5000 year old lava rock, original paintings, New Mexico Photography and more? Santa Fe? Albuquerque? No, to see these original works of art and much much more one must travel to Alamogordo New Mexico’s Main Street, Roadrunner Emporium, 928 New York Avenue Alamogordo…

Original Rene Sepulveda Carrousel Horse Sculpture
Artist Rene Sepulveda Presents at Roadrunner Emporium Alamogordo
1000 Sunflowers a Window Display to Bring Joy Roadrunner Emporium Alamogordo
Awesome window displays by local artist to inspire Roadrunner Emporium Alamogordo

Roadrunner Emporium hosts 40 partnered vendors,  Artist Rene Sepulveda showcases his works that have been purchased by individuals in Europe, Mexico, Canada and throughout the United State. Rene Sepulveda does not take his art work too serous and approaches with whimsical insights but serious in their color, texture and use of natural elements procured from the natural environment.

Rene Sepulveda is credited with starting the “colorlicious styling & textured design’s” trend for in home, patio decor and fine art piece designs. His captivating sculptures crafted of Cholla Art, 5000 year old Lava Rock and/or recycled metals are being received to much acclaim and are bringing a little touch of New Mexico’s Desert in the form of artist sculptures using Cholla Cactus Skeleton, lava and metals to homes and offices throughout America.

His rootart (tree root art) offerings have been showcased in haunting displays, window displays by galleries and retail establishments in New Mexico, California and the western US and have been known to shock and to inspire.

Rene Sepulveda’s newest released collection released 3/14/2021 is “The Valley of the Fires Sculpture Collection” highlights the use of natural wonders from the Tularosa Basin combining recycled 5000 year old lava rock with recycled metals and/or distressed driftwood to create one of kind unique artistic wonders ideal for the home, patio or professional office spaces. His items ship around the world but are hosted at Roadrunner Emporium, Alamogordo.

Per the artist, “I believe that the artistry of Cholla Art, Tree Trunk Art, Root Art or Lava Rock and Metal works are unique and not well understood, in that most homeowners or business owners don’t have the knowledge of the beauty these pieces can bring to their environment. Most people have not been exposed to these kinds of sculptured works, very few artists create art with these mediums as a canvas. Most people don’t know the sense of Zen or harmony that is created by including these pieces into the home, office, or business environment. However those that venture south to Alamogordo are in for a treat. A treat of the senses. When they visit downtown Alamogordo they will find a gem of a art gallery that is part art gallery, part antiquing paradise, and more. One never knows what surprise awaits the customer that strolls into Roadrunner Emporium, Alamogordo. “

Delia Lopez Holloway showcases her works of wonder, complex design and interpretative expression on canvas. A Fine Arts Major of New Mexico State University. Her artistic creations are an expression of love, joy, beauty, calm and on occasion the exact opposite. She believes art show provoke and inspire.

A Collection of the Beauty of Women Expressed and on Exhibition at Roadrunner Emporium, Alamogordo New Mexico
The Beauty of Women A collection of Works by Delia Lopez Holloway Roadrunner Emporium & Gallery, Alamogordo New Mexico ( Alamogordo Town News 2nd Life Media
An Expression of Exquisite Color and Complexity on Exhibition Roadrunner Emporium & Art Gallery, Alamogordo New Mexico by Delia Lopez Holloway
An Expression of Exquisite Color and Complexity on Exhibition Roadrunner Emporium & Art Gallery, Alamogordo New Mexico by Delia Lopez Holloway ( Alamogordo Town News 2nd Life Media)

Photography such as from the infamous California nature photographer Janet Thornton. Scenes from California, New Mexico and the natural environment around us…

Moss A Photograph in Nature Janet Thornton Gallery Roadrunner Emporium
“Moss” A Photograph in Nature Janet Thornton Gallery Roadrunner Emporium
"Wisteria" A Photographic expression of color by Janet Thornton Galleries at Roadrunner Emporium Alamogordo
“Wisteria” A Photographic expression of color by Janet Thornton Galleries at Roadrunner Emporium Alamogordo (Alamogordo Town News, 2nd Life Media)

The photography of history and abandon of New Mexico by Author, Display Artist and Photographer Chris Edwards 2nd Life Gallery, Roadrunner Emporium, 928 New York Avenue Alamogordo.

Photography of Author Chris Edwards Coach Bob Sepulveda The Early Days
Photography of Author Chris Edwards Coach Bob Sepulveda The Early Days
Photography of Author Chris Edwards Coach Bob Sepulveda The Early Days
Photography of Author Chris Edwards Coach Bob Sepulveda The Early Days
Photography of Author Chris Edwards Coach Bob Sepulveda The Early Days
Photography of Author Chris Edwards Coach Bob Sepulveda The Early Days

The Roadrunner Emporium, 928 New York Avenue Alamogordo is owned by Debra Reyes and is dedicated to the enrichment of the cultural arts and downtown redevelopment of the Alamogordo Main Street District. It is located in a historic building that is clean, fresh and historic. Come check out the best art gallery in Alamogordo for art and more 10 to 5 daily. Closed Sundays. 

https://2ndlifemediaalamogordo.town.news/g/alamogordo-nm/n/29559/southern-new-mexicos-must-go-art-gallery-more-roadrunner-emporium-new-york

Alamogordo Sport History: A Look Back at the 1973 Alamogordo Tigers Track and Field Team with District & State Results – Alamogordo Town News & Sports

A Look Back at the 1973 Alamogordo Tigers Track and Field Team brings us to the first of many track and field state trophies to be awarded to Alamogordo High School under the leadership of Coach Bob Sepulveda who led the team from the late 60’s to the mid 90’s. Under his leadership the track and field team won 5 state title, 4 in a row in the mid 90’s and countless 2nd, and 3rd place state trophies as well as district titles. 1973 was a defining year in the path upward for Alamogordo High Track and Field.

The 1973 Alamogordo Tiger Track and Field felt the pressure of District Wins each of the 3 preceding years. From a team of only 13 just 3 years ago, the 1973 squad consisted of 32 team members.

(Photo above 1973 Alamogordo High Track and Field Team Fieldsmen L-R: Norman Avila, Terry Rich, Bob Tuttle. Backrow: Ron Gourley, Steve Fredrick, Carl Hutchison, David Burch & Tim McMurry.)

Photo Above 1973 Alamogordo High Track and Field Team Sprinters  front row: Will Henley, Paul Najera, Ken Washington, David Finley. Back row: Dale Norman, Dennis Baca, Larry Vorquez, Pat Telles, Jim Sanders. Third Row: Joe Wright, Scott Hutt and Chuck Wood.

Photo Above: 1973 Alamogordo High Track & Field Distance Runners front row: David Dunlop, Russell Golightly, Tom Woolworth, Brad Person, Charles Racoosin. Second row: David Sanchez, Steven Garcia, Terry McLean, Eddy Garcia, Robert Golightly and Ken Burns.

Photo in story above Coach Bob Sepulveda in 1973 with the stopwatch checking his teams times. His saying prevails today, “the stopwatch never lies, run, run, run”

The Alamogordo Tiger Boy’s took several medals at the White Sands Rolla Buck Invitational Meet of 1973. At that time girls did not participate in interscholastic sports but all of that was in the process of changing as GAA was phasing out and interscholastic sports for girls would begin the next year via title IX at Alamogordo High.

Alamogordo Boy’s who placed at the 1973 Rolla Buck White Sands Invitational Sponsored by the Lions Club included:

  • Terry Rich, 3rd Place Pole Vault
  • Chuck Wood, 1st Place, 220 Yard Dash
  • Dale Norman, 2nd Place 120 High Hurdles
    • 3rd Place Low Hurdles
  • Will Henley, 2nd Place, 100 Yard Dash
    • 2nd Place, 220 Dash
  • Robert Golightly, 3rd Place, Mile Run
  • Steve Frederick, 3rd Place, Shot Put
  • Mark Taylor, 2nd Place, 440 Yard Dash
  • Scott Hutt, 3rd Place, 880 Run
  • Art Keller, Ken Washington, Chuck Wood, Jimmy Sanders, 4th Place, Medley Relay

School records were established in the mile relay and the 180- yard low hurdles Saturday during the White Sands Relays sponsored by the Tiger Track Team and the Evening Lions Club of 1973.

Art Keller flashed over the hurdles in 19.6 in the preliminaries and went on to win the event and he was named the “Outstanding Athlete” for the Relays.

The Tiger mile relay team ripped off that distance in 3.24.7 to break the school record set by Bowie in 1972 during the Relays when they ran it in 3.26.2. Relay team members were Ken Washington, Dennis Baca, Mark Taylor and Jimmy Sanders.

The Tiger 440 Relay Team took first when they ran it in 43.6 Art Keller, Ken Washington, Chuck Wood and Jimmy Sanders were on the team. Keller also took first in the 100- yard dash. Chuck Wood took 1st in the 220 dash. Jimmy Sanders took 1st in the 440 dash. Carl Hutchison tied for1st in the High Jump. Steve Frederickson took 1st in the discus. Robert Golightly placed 1st in the two-mile run….

Meet results showed the Tigers with a team 1st place win with a final total of 112 ½ Bowie came in 2nd at 46 ½ and Cobre came in 3rd with a 41 ½.

The District Title in 1973 went again to the Alamogordo Tigers for a 4th consecutive year in a row. The local paper of the time the Alamogordo Daily News Reported:

1972/73 District Track & Field Results  May 6th, 1973 Headline Alamogordo Sports Section…”Thinclads Get 135 Points to Cop 4th District Win”

“Tiger Thinclads walked… or ran… jumped or threw further and faster than anyone else in the district 3AAAA at Las Cruces on Saturday, to take their 4th District Win in a row under Coach Bob Sepulveda. 12 of the Tigers placed 1st
Place in the meet competitions as the Tigers Topped 135 points for a 1st Place finish. Mayfield scored 94 points for a 2nd Place Finish and Las Cruces scored 75 points for a 3rd Place Finish.”

1973 Alamogordo High School Boys Track and Field District Medalist included:

  • Carl Hutchison, 1st Place, High Jump
  • Steve Frederick, 1st Place, Discus
  • 1st Place, 440 Relay Team
  • 2nd Place, Shot Put
  • Art Keller, 1st Place, 100 Yard Dash
    • 1st Place, 880 Relay Team
  • 1st Place, Mile Relay Team
  • 2nd Place,120 Low Hurdles
  • Jimmy Sanders, 1st Place, 440 Relay Team
  • Larry Vazquez , 1st Place, Mile Relay Team
  • Dale Norman, 1st Place, High Hurdles
    • 1st Place, Low Hurdles
  • Mark Taylor, 2nd Place, 440
  • Scott Hutt, 1st Place ,880
  • Chuck Wood, 1st Place220
    • 2nd Place, High Hurdles
  • Robert Golightly, 1st Place, 2Mile
    • 2nd Place, 1 Mile
  • Dennis Baca, 2nd Place,220
    • 5th Place, 120 High Hurdles
  • Brad Pierson, 2nd Place, 2 Mile
  • Charlie Racoosin, 4th Place, 2Mile
  • Art Keller, Ken Washington, Chuck Wood, Jimmy Sanders, 3rd Place, Medley Relay
  • Will Henley, 3rd Place,220
    • 4th Place, 100 Yard Dash
  • Terry McClean, 5th Place, Mile
  • Terry Rich, 5th Place, Pole Vault

13 Tigers qualified to attend the state meet in Albuquerque May 11th and 12th, 1973.

May 12th, 1973 is a day that will live in the memories of most of the class of 1973 as that is the day the Boys brought home a state trophy. The headlines across the state raged on about the upset and surprise that Alamogordo pulled off a 2nd place showing at the state level.

“The Alamogordo Tiger Thinclads surprised most of the track experts when they pulled into the 2nd Place position during

the State Track Meet to capture a big trophy at Albuquerque”

Photo Above 1973 2nd Place State Track and Field Trophy and Winning Team: Back L-R: Coach Dick Strong, Coach Jack Geron, Dale Norman, Steve Frederick, Carl Hutchison, Jimmy Sanders, Scott Hutt, Mark Taylor, Coach Jack Narrell, Head Coach Bob Sepulveda. Front L-R: Manager Pat McMurry, Art Keller, Robert Golightly, Brad Pierson, Dennis Baca, Ken Washington and Chuck Wood. (Photo Courtesy Coach Bob Sepulveda The Early Days Book 1- Alamogordo News 5/17/73)

Defending State Champion Hobbs took an early lead and placed 1st to win the state. Alamogordo Tigers placed second in the state meet with 48 points followed by Carlsbad in 3rd place and Clovis closing out with a 4th place win.

Individual State Medalist for the 1973 State Track Meet from the Alamogordo Tiger’s Track and Field Team included:

  • Steve Fredericks, 1st Place, Discus, 159’10”
  • Robert Golightly, 1st Place, 2 Mile Run ,10.31.1
  • Ken Washington, Larry Vazquez , Mark Taylor & Jimmy Sanders 1st Place, Mile Relay, 3.25.4
  • Jimmy Sanders, 3rd Place, 440,49.8
  • Dale Norman, 5th Place, 180 Low Hurdles, 21.3
  • Art Keller, Ken Washington, Chuck Wood, Jimmy Sanders, 3rd Place, 440 Relay, 48.4
  • Scott Hutt, 4th Place, 880,2.00
  • Chuck Wood, 3rd Place, 220, 22.6
    • 5th Place, 100, 10.2
  • Carl Hutchison, 3rd Place, High Jump, 6’.0
  • Art Keller, 4th Place, 100,10.1

(Photo Above Art Keller Team Member 1973 Track & Field State Medalist Alamogordo Tiger Track Team of 1973.)

(Photo Above Jimmy Sanders at the New Mexico State Track Meet Placing 1st in the 1 Mile Relay with team members Ken Washington, Larry Vazquez and Mark Taylor. (Photo courtesy Coach Bob Sepulveda Collection)

Alamogordo High School Girls competed in the state GAA event that same weekend. 59 Girls attended the 6th annual GAA track meet representing Alamogordo. Seventh to Twelfth graders took part in three classes: Senior, Junior and Intermediate. 31 Junior High, 21 Mid High and 7 High School girls entered.

The Alamogordo Girls took 2nd in the Senior High level, 3rd in the Junior Division and 3rd in the Intermediate Division.

The coaches were Marilyn Sepulveda, Fran Stirman and Helen Reed.

Source and certain Excerpts from Alamogordo News referenced in Coach Bob Sepulveda The Early Days Book 1 from 1973 Available Locally at Roadrunner Emporium, 928 New York Avenue Alamogordo, Tularosa Basin Historical Society on White Sands Blvd, and on Amazon in 36 Countries.

https://2ndlifemediaalamogordo.town.news/g/alamogordo-nm/n/29443/alamogordo-sport-history-look-back-1973-alamogordo-tigers-track-and-field

Alamogordo Town News Supports The Arts: DON’T LET THE FLICKINGER CENTER FLICKER OUT, HELP SUPPORT & DONATE TODAY!

Due to the Covid-19 pandemic the Flickinger had to postpone the annual campaign kick-off and has lost revenue due to cancelled events and rentals. The cost of these losses is incalculable.

Through the generosity of local donors, grants, and some limited cash reserves, the center has been able to pay utilities, insurances, taxes, take care of facility maintenance, pay essential salaries and other expenses. This cost is about $10K per month, and funds are being depleted.

The leadership of the Center got creative to find ways to support their mission and support the performance arts community:

• Four Fall Tailgate Series concerts at the NM Museum Space History parking lot.

• Children’s Music Theater has been able to conduct small socially distanced workshops thanks to CMT Director Heather Bash.

• Patron’s Hall has reopened for take out coffee, ice cream, and freshly made soups.

• The Center is working towards adding outdoor music & events this spring. (A special NM State grant is helping with funding for the outdoor project.)

Through their “Keeping the Lights On” campaign, they hope to continue to weather this storm and come out stronger on the other side. As a community that respects the arts we can keep the arts alive in Alamogordo! 

Please consider a cash contribution or monthly sustained giving pledge to this campaign. The Center appreciates all levels of support and your gift will help them keep the performing arts alive in Alamogordo. Don’t let this beautiful and important part of this community flicker out, donate today!

https://www.etix.com/ticket/ds/655/flickinger-center-for-performing-arts-donations.jsp?cobrand=Flickinger

https://2ndlifemediaalamogordo.town.news/g/alamogordo-nm/n/29497/dont-let-flickinger-center-flicker-out-help-support-donate-today

“Don’t follow your dreams, chase them!” Alamogordo Town News Positive Thoughts

As we remind our readers, podcast listeners and partners daily concerning our affirmations; a habit is “a settled or regular tendency or practice, especially one that is hard to give up.” Habits become a lifestyle a “glass half full” mindset becomes a lifestyle and that leads to permanent results. Science and real-world experience tell us that it actually takes a minimum of 28 days to begin to form a habit, but on average its really between 60 to 90 days. For most of us 90 days is a much more effective and realistic timeframe to incorporate a new behavior into our life, thus 90 Days To A Glass Half Full Lifestyle.

Our Daily Action Steps Are To:

  • Commit to taking 5 minutes each morning as you begin your day to read the daily quote.
  • If you are moved or inspired by the quote; share it in an email, phone call, conversation, text, tweet or on your social media network or platform. When we share something, it becomes more real to us.
  • In your own words write in a journal how the quote or thought applies to you or your circumstances, today. If it doesn’t write on your page the first thing that comes into your mind after reading the quote.
  • The end of the day, prior to bed, take 5 more minutes for yourself. Re-read the quote again and write or think of how you applied or took an action today with a person, situation or referenced the daily quote in mind. Reflect on the day, was there any event in the day where your thinking was impacted differently because of the quote or the affirmation.
  • Let’s have fun with the system and commit.
  • Now, Let’s begin with today’s affirmation:
“Don’t follow your dreams, chase them!”

Beginning of Day: How’s the above quote apply to me or what comes to mind when reading the quote above?

End of day: Re-read the quote. Did I share the quote or apply any of its meaning into any part of my day? What issue or situation made me think of or refer to the quote above? Did it help me bridge a positive outcome or mindset?

We encourage you to write or journal your thoughts or reflections on today’s quote.

“Don’t follow your dreams, chase them!”

It’s your life, express yourself as your true and honest self and let’s work together for self improvement and a Glass Half Full mindset.

Author Chris Edwards lectures, has his podcast and writes. His book series 90 Days to a Glass Half Full Lifestyle is 3 part series that garnered much acclaim from many coming out of rehab and those coming out of incarceration and beginning anew. His other book series, book 1 Coach Bob Sepulveda The Early Days is an inspirational sport history of interscholastic sports in New Mexico. All of his books are found at fine independent book sellers such as Roadrunner Emporium, 928 New York Avenue, Alamogordo, New Mexico and available via Amazon in 36 countries.

Listen to our report and positive affirmations via our podcasts or check us out online at

https://2ndlifemediaalamogordo.town.news/g/alamogordo-nm/n/29501/positive-news-daily-affirmation-5-10-21-28-days-habit-90-days-lifestyle

Happy Cinco De Mayo

Cinco de Mayo, or the fifth of May, is a holiday that celebrates the date of the Mexican army’s May 5, 1862 victory over France at the Battle of Puebla during the Franco-Mexican War. The day, which falls on Wednesday, May 5 in 2021, is also known as Battle of Puebla Day. While it is a relatively minor holiday in Mexico, in the United States, Cinco de Mayo has evolved into a commemoration of Mexican culture and heritage, particularly in areas with large Mexican-American populations.

Cinco de Mayo is not Mexican Independence Day, a popular misconception. Instead, it commemorates a single battle. In 1861, Benito Juárez—a lawyer and member of the Indigenous Zapotec tribe—was elected president of Mexico. At the time, the country was in financial ruin after years of internal strife, and the new president was forced to default on debt payments to European governments.

In response, France, Britain and Spain sent naval forces to Veracruz, Mexico, demanding repayment. Britain and Spain negotiated with Mexico and withdrew their forces.

France, however, ruled by Napoleon III, decided to use the opportunity to carve an empire out of Mexican territory. Late in 1861, a well-armed French fleet stormed Veracruz, landing a large force of troops and driving President Juárez and his government into retreat.

Certain that success would come swiftly, 6,000 French troops under General Charles Latrille de Lorencez set out to attack Puebla de Los Angeles, a small town in east-central Mexico. From his new headquarters in the north, Juárez rounded up a ragtag force of 2,000 loyal men—many of them either Indigenous Mexicans or of mixed ancestry—and sent them to Puebla.

The vastly outnumbered and poorly supplied Mexicans, led by Texas-born General Ignacio Zaragoza, fortified the town and prepared for the French assault. On May 5, 1862, Lorencez gathered his army—supported by heavy artillery—before the city of Puebla and led an assault.

The battle lasted from daybreak to early evening, and when the French finally retreated they had lost nearly 500 soldiers. Fewer than 100 Mexicans had been killed in the clash.

Although not a major strategic win in the overall war against the French, Zaragoza’s success at the Battle of Puebla on May 5 represented a great symbolic victory for the Mexican government and bolstered the resistance movement. In 1867—thanks in part to military support and political pressure from the United States, which was finally in a position to aid its besieged neighbor after the end of the Civil War—France finally withdrew.

The same year, Austrian Archduke Ferdinand Maximilian, who had been installed as emperor of Mexico in 1864 by Napoleon, was captured and executed by Juárez’s forces. Puebla de Los Angeles was renamed for General Zaragoza, who died of typhoid fever months after his historic triumph there.

Cinco de Mayo in Mexico

Within Mexico, Cinco de Mayo is primarily observed in the state of Puebla, where Zaragoza’s unlikely victory occurred, although other parts of the country also take part in the celebration.

Traditions include military parades, recreations of the Battle of Puebla and other festive events. For many Mexicans, however, May 5 is a day like any other: It is not a federal holiday, so offices, banks and stores remain open.

Why Do We Celebrate Cinco de Mayo in the United States?

In the United States, Cinco de Mayo is widely interpreted as a celebration of Mexican culture and heritage, particularly in areas with substantial Mexican-American populations.

Chicano activists raised awareness of the holiday in the 1960s, in part because they identified with the victory of Indigenous Mexicans (such as Juárez) over European invaders during the Battle of Puebla.

Today, revelers mark the occasion with parades, parties, mariachi music, Mexican folk dancing and traditional foods such as tacos and mole poblano. Some of the largest festivals are held in Los AngelesChicago and Houston.

Building Awareness Press Freedom Day,  Alamogordo, May 3, 2021 Alamogordo Town News & Second Life Media Author Chris Edwards

Amendment One: Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

World Press Freedom Day in collaboration with the World Journalist Alamogordo Town News 2nd Life Media

Building Awareness Press Freedom Day,  Alamogordo, May 3, 2021

Press Freedom is a fundamental requirement for a free and informed Democracy. We don’t always agree with opinions expressed, we may not like much of the news we hear and we may feel all news is negative. It doesn’t have to be. A record amount of censorship, unprecedented attacks on journalists, a consolidation of news outlets by big corporations and the collapse of small town local newspapers and online papers all threaten the freedoms and foundation of our fragile democracy.

Even here in Alamogordo the primary newspaper is owned by a media conglomerate resulting in diminished local coverage and opinions expressed directed from far off corporate offices. Local free citizen journalism is more important now than at any time in our county’s history with a focus on local sports, business successes and positivity. That is where we fill a void. We are here to inform, inspire and encourage. We ask for you to support our advertisers, share our pages and daily posts, sign up for our free daily newsletter and share our vision of positive news and affirmations to a more positive community.

Journalists uncover the truth, check the abuse of power, and demand transparency from those in power. They are indispensable to the functioning of democracy. Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, journalists and media workers have been on the front lines to keep the public informed, at significant risk to their own health. And, at a time when the truth is increasingly under attack, our need for accurate, fact-based reporting, open public conversation, and accountability has never been greater.

We collaborate and honor World Press Freedom Day was proclaimed by the UN General Assembly in December 1993, following the recommendation of UNESCO’s General Conference. Since then, 3 May, the anniversary of the Declaration of Windhoek is celebrated worldwide as World Press Freedom Day.

After 30 years, the historic connection made between the freedom to seek, impart and receive information and the public good remains as relevant as it was at the time of its signing. Special commemorations of the 30th anniversary are planned to take place during World Press Freedom Day International Conference.

May 3 acts as a reminder to governments of the need to respect their commitment to press freedom. It is also a day of reflection among media professionals about issues of press freedom and professional ethics. It is an opportunity to:

  • celebrate the fundamental principles of press freedom;
  • assess the state of press freedom throughout the world;
  • defend the media from attacks on their independence;
  • and pay tribute to journalists who have lost their lives in the line of duty.

This year’s World Press Freedom Day theme “Information as a Public Good” serves as a call to affirm the importance of cherishing information as a public good, and exploring what can be done in the production, distribution and reception of content to strengthen journalism, and to advance transparency and empowerment while leaving no one behind. The theme is of urgent relevance to all countries across the world. It recognizes the changing communications system that is impacting on our health, our human rights, democracies and sustainable development.

While governments harass, detain and silence journalists there are organizations around that work to protect your freedom of information around the world in order to keep you as citizens of the world informed.

American reporters are at risk at times at home but more so when reporting overseas. As an example Washington Post reporter Jason Rezaian was arrested in Iran last July with his wife, who also is a journalist. She was later released, but he is on trial on charges that include spying, which he has denied. His trial is closed to the public.

The One Free Press Coalition acts as a voice for all journalists under attack for pursuing the truth. Media outlets worldwide, including Voice of America, unite to give voice to their stories and hold power figures to account.

The One Free Press Coalition publishes a monthly list of the world’s “10 Most Urgent” press freedom abuses, and the cases of journalists who cover human rights topics. The Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ) determined that 55% of journalists imprisoned in 2020 write about human rights, and 306 journalists reporting on human rights have been killed since 1992.

CPJ and the International Women’s Media Foundation (IWMF) maintain safety resources and provide support to ensure these professionals can carry out their work for the public good, and do so as safely as possible.

The 10 Most Urgent, May 2021 At Risk Journalist in the World Include:

1. Ibraimo Abú Mbaruco (Mozambique)

Mozambican radio reporter and human rights advocate in Cabo Delgado has been missing for over a year as conflict in the region escalates. Family and colleagues still have no information on his whereabouts after he sent an SOS text saying he was “surrounded by soldiers.” 

2. Kasra Nouri (Iran)

Journalist, serving a 12-year sentence related to his coverage of religious protests in 2018, has spent a significant amount of time in solitary confinement, been moved multiple times, and his family is currently unable to communicate with him. 

3. Pham Chi Dung (Vietnam)     

Freelance internet reporter and founding chairman of a civil society organization advocating for press freedom is serving a 15-year prison sentence on anti-state charges after calling on the EU to postpone trade agreements until Vietnam improves its human rights record.

4. Ahmed Humaidan (Bahrain)

Photographer covering protests in Bahrain was arrested while documenting protesters attacking a police station in 2012, and sentenced to ten years behind bars in 2014. He recently contracted and recovered from COVID-19 while imprisoned.

5. Esraa Abdelfattah (Egypt)

Longtime blogger, journalist and activist reporting on human rights has been held on false news and anti-state charges since 2019, and has had her pretrial detention extended. She has gone on hunger strikes multiple times to protest her sentence and treatment.

6. Leonardo Sakamoto and the team at Repórter Brasil (Brazil)

Leonardo Sakamoto is the president of Repórter Brasil, an investigative reporting organization, focused on issues from human trafficking to workers’ rights to environmental degradation. The outlet has faced online attacks, attempted break-ins and anonymous threats.

7. Sandhya Ravishankar (India)

Freelance journalist reporting on elections, politics and corruption, including on Tamil Nadu’s sand mafia and beach sand mining, has faced years of threats and harassment, including death and rape threats, doxing, and a 2018 attempt to sabotage her motorbike.

8. Agnieszka Pikulicka (Uzbekistan)

Freelance correspondent threatened publicly by Uzbek Interior Ministry with potential lawsuits in relation to her reporting on the attack of an LGBTQ activist.

9. Katsiaryna Barysevich (Belarus)

Correspondent for the independent news website Tut.by was sentenced earlier this year to six months behind bars for her coverage of protests in Belarus in 2020.

10. Daria Komarova (Russia)

Russian journalist for Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty has been put on three trials in relation to her coverage of pro-Navalny protests, facing potential fines and administrative detention.

Today, on World Press Freedom Day, we, as independent community journalist, authors and publishers with 2nd Life Media and Alamogordo Town News celebrate the awesome bravery of journalists everywhere; locally, within the US and worldwide that standup to popular opinions, the power structure and an informed public. We recognize the integral role a free press plays in building prosperous, resilient and free societies. We recommit daily to protecting and promoting free, independent, and diverse media around the world and always when possible inform, inspire, educate and promote the positivity life has to offer.

Today we celebrate a free press and a free Alamogordo that in unity with all celebrates freedom!

Commentary by Chris Edwards, Author Alamogordo Town New, 2nd Life Media.

Sources:  One Free Press Coalition,  Forbes, Wikipedia and United Nation Press Freedom Information Pages

Coaches Bill Aldridge & 28 year veteran Tommy Standefer have set the standard for Southern New Mexico Golf in a program with roots to the 1950s

Alamogordo has a long history of golf success dating back to the 1960’s under coach Billy Aldridge. To learn more and to hear coach Billy Aldridge’s story check our story archives or listen to our podcast on Spotify at https://open.spotify.com/episode/3RNff9f7XPuS6pMcZJBb4l

the New Mexico Activities association offered State Tournaments in Golf for boys beginning in 1933. The first Boy in the state of New Mexico to win a State Golf Title was Ralph Petty of Carrizozo in 1933.

Alamogordo High School Boys Golf program began to gain some tracking in the 50’s was was not recognized as truly competitive until the 1960s and 1970s under the leadership of Billy Aldridge. He was credited with creating a legitimate program that was a model high schools and community colleges around the country. The Alamogordo Boys Golf program has won 3 state titles and 4 individuals titles in the boys division since inception. 

State Individual Boys Title holders include:

  • 1966 AA Bruce McKenzie
  • 1971 AAAA Brad Bryant
  • 1973 AAAA Brad Bryant
  • 2008 AAAAA Jeffery O’Dell with scores of 76-73 total 149

State Boys Gold Team Titles were won in:

  • 1965 AA Alamogordo Coach Bill Aldridge
  • 1971 AAAA Alamogordo Coach Bill Aldridge
  • 1972 AAAA Alamogordo Coach Bill Aldridge

Girls Golf was not sanctioned as an interscholastic sport until 1973. The first girl to wine a state title was Nancy Romero of Socorro in 1973.

State Individual Girls Title holders include:

  • 1995 AAAA Dianne Overstreet
  • 1999 AAAA Tiada Lane with a total score of 160
  • 2003 AAAAA Destini Esquero  with scores of 78-78 totaling156
  • 2011 AAAAA Kacey Dalpes  with score of 79-77 totaling 156
  • AAAAA Kacey Dalpes with a score of 69-76 totaling 145

State Boys Girls Team Titles were won in:

  • 1996 AAAA Alamogordo Coach Scott Summers 
  • 2001 AAAAA Alamogordo Coach Tommy Standefer
  • 2002 AAAAA Alamogordo Coach Tommy Standefer 
  • 2003 AAAAA Alamogordo Tommy Standefer

Coach Tommy Standefer won 3 girls golf state titles in a row between 2001 and 2003. Coach Standefer has coached for Alamogordo for almost 28 years and is still coaching and assisted by Coach Billy Hays. The Alamogordo Girls have attended a state tournament 28 times in the last 30 years. Fifteen times, the girls have finished with a trophy, either first, second or third, at state a record to be very proud of.

The Alamogordo Golf Teams most recent play was Wednesday at the Chaparral Invitational.

 The Alamogordo Boys finished 2nd at Chaparral on Wednesday. 

  • Boys Tyler Cullers – 82
  • Michael Overstreet – 92
  • Bradley McMillen – 92
  • Colin Silva – 93
  • Marco Terrazas – 100

In Girls Golf competition the girls did not have a complete team at Chaparral.

  • Sophia Fredrick – 100
  • Chloe Johnston – 110
  • Kylie Rideout – 133

Both teams next compete at Deming Tournament May 7th, 2021.

History Made 11/14/1960 & 4/28/21 “One Small Step” Ruby Bridges & Kamala Harris

One small step, by one brave little girl helped make it possible for one of the most striking historical images of President Biden’s state of the union address. The little girl in the top photos is that of Ruby Bridges, the first African American, to attend a white elementary school in the deep South, 1960.

The image of two women below; one a woman of color, the other the daughter of Italian Immigrants, both for the first time -women- in the chairs behind the president. The chairs historically are filled by the vice president and speaker. Tonight, 4/28/2021 is the first time both roles are held by women; a woman of color and the daughter of an immigrant — Kamala Harris and Nancy Pelosi.

Ruby Bridges and her place in our history

Judge J. Skelly Wright’s court order for the first day of integrated schools in New Orleans on Monday, November 14, 1960

At the early age of only six years old, Ruby Bridges advanced the cause of civil rights in that November 1960, she became the first African American student to integrate an elementary school in the South.

Born on September 8, 1954, Bridges was the oldest of five children for Lucille and Abon Bridges, farmers in Tylertown, Mississippi. When Ruby was two years old, her parents moved their family to New Orleans, Louisiana in search of better work opportunities. Ruby’s birth year coincided with the US Supreme Court’s landmark ruling in Brown v. the Board of Education of Topeka Kansas, which ended racial segregation in public schools.

Nonetheless, southern states continued to resist integration, and in 1959, Ruby attended a segregated New Orleans kindergarten. A year later, however, a federal court ordered Louisiana to desegregate. The school district created entrance exams for African American students to see whether they could compete academically at the all-white school. Ruby and five other students passed the exam.

Her parents were torn about whether to let her attend the all-white William Frantz Elementary School, a few blocks from their home. Her father resisted, fearing for his daughter’s safety; her mother, however, wanted Ruby to have the educational opportunities that her parents had been denied. Meanwhile, the school district dragged its feet, delaying her admittance until November 14. Two of the other students decided not to leave their school at all; the other three were sent to the all-white McDonough Elementary School.

Judge J. Skelly Wright’s court ordered the first day of integrated schools in New Orleans to be Monday, November 14, 1960. The historic day was documented in newspapers and magazines around the US.

Bridges described her first day of school, “Driving up I could see the crowd, but living in New Orleans, I actually thought it was Mardi Gras. There was a large crowd of people outside of the school. They were throwing things and shouting, and that sort of goes on in New Orleans at Mardi Gras, however I was soon to find out this demonstration was not a celebration and certainly was not the party atmosphere of the Mardi Gras.”

Retired, former United States Deputy Marshal Charles Burks recalled, “She showed a lot of courage. She never cried. She did not whimper. She just marched along like a little soldier, and we’re all immensely proud of her.” She was escorted and supported by the Federal US Marshals Service for over a year till things finaly stabilized and the people of New Orleans accepted integration as the law of the land.

Little Ms. Bridges spent her first day in the principal’s office due to the chaos created as angry white parents pulled their children from school. Ardent segregationists withdrew their children permanently.

Barbara Henry, a white Boston native, was the only teacher willing to accept Ruby, and all year, she was a class of one. Ruby ate lunch alone and sometimes played with her teacher at recess, but she never missed a day of school that year.

On the second day, however, a white student broke the boycott and entered the school when a 34-year-old Methodist minister, Lloyd Anderson Foreman, walked his five-year-old daughter Pam through the angry mob, saying, “I simply want the privilege of taking my child to school …” A few days later, other white parents began bringing their children, and the protests began to subside.

Every morning, as Bridges walked to school, one woman would threaten to poison her, while another held up a black baby doll in a coffin; because of this, the U.S. Marshals dispatched by President Eisenhower, who were overseeing her safety, allowed Bridges to eat only the food that she brought from home.

Child psychiatrist Robert Coles volunteered to provide counseling to Bridges during her first year at Frantz. He met with her weekly in the Bridges home, later writing a children’s book, The Story of Ruby Bridges, to acquaint other children with Bridges’ story. Coles donated the royalties from the sale of that book to the Ruby Bridges Foundation, to provide money for school supplies or other educational needs for impoverished New Orleans school children.

While some families supported her bravery—and some northerners sent money to aid her family—others protested throughout the city. The Bridges family suffered for their courage.

The Bridges family suffered for their decision to send her to William Frantz Elementary: her father lost his job as a gas station attendant; the grocery store the family shopped at would no longer let them shop there; her grandparents, who were sharecroppers in Mississippi, were turned off their land; and Abon and Lucille Bridges separated. Bridges has noted that many others in the community, both black and white, showed support in a variety of ways. Some white families continued to send their children to Frantz despite the protests, a neighbor provided her father with a new job, and local people babysat, watched the house as protectors, and walked behind the federal marshals’ car on the trips to school.

It was not until Bridges was an adult that she learned that the immaculate clothing she wore to school in those first weeks at Frantz was sent to her family by a relative of Coles. Bridges says her family could never have afforded the dresses, socks, and shoes that are documented in photographs of her escort by U.S. Marshals to and from the school.

In 1964, artist Norman Rockwell celebrated her courage with a painting of that first day entitled, “The Problem We All Live With.” The commemorated painting by Norman Rockwell titled The Problem We All Live With was published in Look magazine on January 14, 1964.

Bridges, now Ruby Bridges Hall, still lives in New Orleans with her husband, Malcolm Hall, and their four sons. After graduating from a desegregated high school, she worked as a travel agent for 15 years and later became a full-time parent.  She is now chair of the Ruby Bridges Foundation, which she formed in 1999 to promote “the values of tolerance, respect, and appreciation of all differences”. Describing the mission of the group, she says, “racism is a grown-up disease and we must stop using our children to spread it.”

Bridges is the subject of the Lori McKenna song “Ruby’s Shoes”. Her, childhood struggle at William Frantz Elementary School was portrayed in the 1998 made-for-TV movie Ruby Bridges. The young Bridges was portrayed by actress Chaz Monet, and the movie also featured Lela Rochon as Bridges’ mother, Lucille “Lucy” Bridges; Michael Beach as Bridges’ father, Abon Bridges; Penelope Ann Miller as Bridges’ teacher, Mrs. Henry; and Kevin Pollak as Dr. Robert Coles.

Like hundreds of thousands of others in the greater New Orleans area, Bridges lost her home (in Eastern New Orleans) to catastrophic flooding from the failure of the levee system during Hurricane Katrina in 2005. Hurricane Katrina also greatly damaged William Frantz Elementary School, and Bridges played a significant role in fighting for the school to remain open.

In November 2007, the Children’s Museum of Indianapolis unveiled a new permanent exhibit documenting her life, along with the lives of Anne Frank and Ryan White. The exhibit, called “The Power of Children: Making a Difference”, cost $6 million to install and includes an authentic re-creation of Bridges’ first grade classroom.

In 2010, Bridges had a 50th-year reunion at William Frantz Elementary with Pam Foreman Testroet, who had been, at the age of five, the first white child to break the boycott that ensued from Bridges’ attendance at that school.

On July 15, 2011, Bridges met with President Barack Obama at the White House, and while viewing the Norman Rockwell painting of her on display he told her, “I think it’s fair to say that if it hadn’t been for you guys, I might not be here, and we wouldn’t be looking at this together”. The Rockwell painting was displayed in the West Wing of the White House, just outside the Oval Office, from June through October 2011.

In November 2020 there was an image created of Bridges as a child and Kamala Harris that went viral and made a powerful statement to all that witnessed it. The image is simple: Vice President-elect Kamala Harris, clad in a dark suit and heels, strides past a wall with her eyes locked on the horizon. The shadow she casts is that of then-6-year-old Ruby Bridges, who integrated her New Orleans elementary school in 1960. The artist behind the widely shared image is Bria Goeller, who graduated with highest honors from Emory College of Arts and Sciences in December 2019. She designed the artwork in October for Carl Gordon Jones, founder and owner of the satirical clothing group WTF America-Good Trubble.

Goeller’s design showcasing the parallels between two Black women’s strength in the face of opposition took off Saturday, shared tens of thousands of times after media outlets projected Joe Biden as the winner of the presidential election and Harris was declared the vice president-elect. Bridges, herself shared it on her personal Instagram, as did Kara Walker, the Black artist best known for her work with silhouettes. Bridges thanked Goeller, and Good Trubble “for the inspirational and beautiful artwork.” Tagging Harris and Biden in her post, she wrote, “I am honored to be a part of this path and grateful to stand alongside you, together with our fellow Americans, as we step into this next chapter of American history!”

On this evening as President Biden presents his state of the union address the memory of his speech may not be so much the content of his speech or the proposals to move America forward but the speech will go down historically as significant to the history of the US with the two women on the platform behind the president. Nancy Pelosi, Speaker of the House and a child of an immigrant and Vice President Kamala Harris, the first person of color to sit in that prestigious seat.

We wonder as Vice President Harris looked at her shadow from the camera lights on the wall this historic evening; did she indeed pause for a moment, and see her own reflection, or did she see the reflection of Ruby Bridges and her small step from 1960 that paved the way for Ms. Harris spot in history today.

These two women- bright, committed, positive and successful demonstrate the power of action and how, small actions we do today, may impact the history of an unconnected stranger decades down the road. The historical significance of 11/14/1960 and 4/28/21 shows the destiny of the two amazing passionate women of color intertwined and bound by destiny.

https://2ndlifemediaalamogordo.town.news/g/alamogordo-nm/n/28597/history-made-11141960-42821-one-small-step-ruby-bridges-kamala-harris

April Full Moon 2021: ‘Super Pink Moon’ Pink supermoon is the first and one of only two supermoons of 2021.

April Full Moon 2021: ‘Super Pink Moon’ rises April 26th…

The full moon in April is known as the Pink Moon, though it has nothing to do with the moon’sactual color. The term is coined from creeping phlox, an herb moss that is one of the earliest springtime flowers to bloom. Other names for April’s full moon include the Fish Moon, Sprouting Grass Moon, and the Egg Moon.
During the April full moon tonight and early Tuesday, the moon will be about 222,064 miles (357,378 kilometers) away from Earth, that is about 8% closer than the distance of an average full moon (240,000 miles or 384,400 km). This fluctuation in the full moon’s distance is caused by the fact that the moon’s orbit around the Earth isn’t perfectly circular but very slightly elliptical. If the full moon occurs closer to the perigee (the closest point to Earth on this slightly elliptical orbit), it can appear bigger than if it occurs closer to the apogee (the farthest point).

The super pink moon gets its name from the 1930s, when the Maine Farmers’ Almanac first published the Native American moon names.

Many of the names attributed to the April full moon are associated with the introduction of spring and influenced by the return of regular crop harvesting, farming and fishing.

The pink moon is named after a herb known as moss phlox, creeping phlox or moss pink, and is one of the earliest signs of spring.

Although modern astronomy has adopted this name for the large, April moon, there are other variations across the US and the world.

Sprouting grass moon, the egg moon and the breaking ice moon are all names for the super pink moon, signifying the end to the northern hemisphere’s winter months.

In Eastern Christianity, which follows the Julian calendar, the April full moon – known as the Paschal full moon – indicates when Easter will take place.

Psychic and intuitive astrologer Rose Smith said supermoons are a time of transformation, rebirth and renewal.

“Spiritually, supermoons are all about transformation and bringing up subconscious content for us to deal with – it means it’s time for a purge,” Ms Smith told The New Daily. 

“What this means for you as an individual is reflected by your star sign – however, in general terms it’s a very good time to meditate.

“Have some quiet time for self-reflection, and avoid distractions of the outside world.”

Astrology nuts and those looking for a good excuse for introspection and goal setting are encouraged to harness the super pink moon to help them get the ball rolling.

An early list of “Indian month names” was published in 1918 by Daniel Carter Beard in his The American Boy’s Book of Signs, Signals and Symbolsfor use by the boy scouts. Beard’s “Indian” month names were:

  • January: Difficulty, Black Smoke
  • February: Raccoon, Bare Spots on the Ground
  • March: Wind, Little Grass, Sore-Eye
  • April: Ducks, Goose-Eggs
  • May: Green Grass, Root-Food
  • June: Corn-Planting, Strawberry
  • July: Buffalo (Bull), Hot Sun
  • August: Harvest, Cow Buffalo
  • September: Wild Rice, Red Plum
  • October: Leaf-Falling, Nuts
  • November: Deer-Mating, Fur-Pelts
  • December: Wolves, Big Moon

Such names have gained currency in American folklore. They appear in print more widely outside of the almanac tradition from the 1990s in popular publications about the Moon. Mysteries of the Moonby Patricia Haddock (“Great Mysteries Series”, Greenhaven Press, 1992) gave an extensive list of such names along with the individual tribal groups they were supposedly associated with. Haddock supposes that certain “Colonial American” moon names were adopted from Algonquian languages(which were formerly spoken in the territory of New England), while others are based in European tradition (e.g. the Colonial American names for the May moon, “Milk Moon”, “Mother’s Moon”, “Hare Moon” have no parallels in the supposed native names, while the name of November, “Beaver Moon” is supposedly based in an Algonquian language).

The individual names (some inconsistent) given in Farmers’ Almanac, which is not authoritative, include the following:

  • January: “Wolf Moon” (for December in Beard 1918),”Old Moon”, “Moon After Yule”, “Winter Moon”
  • February: “Snow Moon”, “Hunger Moon”, “Storm Moon”
  • March: “Worm Moon”, “Crow Moon”, “Sap Moon”, “Crust Moon”, “Lenten Moon”, “Wind Moon”
  • April: “Seed Moon”, “Pink Moon”, “Sprouting Grass Moon”, “Pascal Moon”, “Egg Moon” (c.f. “Goose-Egg” in Beard 1918), “Fish Moon”, “Frog Moon”, “Spring Moon”, “Awakening Moon”, “Sap Moon”
  • May: “Milk Moon”, “Flower Moon”, “Corn Planting Moon”, “Grass Moon”, “Mother’s Moon”
  • June: “Mead Moon”, “Strawberry Moon” (c.f. Beard 1918), “Rose Moon”, “Hot Moon”, “Thunder Moon”
  • July: “Hay Moon”, “Buck Moon”, “Elk Moon”, “Summer Moon”, “Thunder Moon”
  • August: “Corn Moon”, “Sturgeon Moon”, “Red Moon”, “Barley Moon”, “Green Corn Moon”, “Grain Moon”, “Herb Moon”, “Wyrt Moon”, “Dog Moon”
  • September: “Harvest Moon”, “Corn Moon”, “Fruit Moon”, “Barley Moon”
  • October: “Hunter’s Moon”, “Blood Moon”, “Autumn Moon”, “Fall Moon”, “Sanguine Moon”, “Pumpkin Moon”, “Dying Moon”
  • November: “Beaver Moon”, “Turkey Moon”, “Frosty Moon”, “Dark Moon”
  • December: “Oak Moon”, “Cold Moon”, “Long Night’s Moon”.

Regardless of what you call the moon or what your heritage or folklore tells us what is fun is to unplug, look up at the sky and enjoy the wonder, beauty and amazement of the pink moon tonight. 

Credit as sources Cassandra Tassios, The Old Farmers Almanac and Wikipedia. 

https://2ndlifemediaalamogordo.town.news/g/alamogordo-nm/n/28366/april-full-moon-2021-super-pink-moon-pink-supermoon-first-and-one-only-two


28 Days A Habit 90 Days a Lifestyle Affirmation for 4-25-21

As we remind our readers, podcast listeners and partners daily concerning our affirmations; a habit is “a settled or regular tendency or practice, especially one that is hard to give up.” Habits become a lifestyle a “glass half full” mindset becomes a lifestyle and that leads to permanent results. Science and real-world experience tell us that it actually takes a minimum of 28 days to begin to form a habit, but on average its really between 60 to 90 days. For most of us 90 days is a much more effective and realistic timeframe to incorporate a new behavior into our life, thus 90 Days To A Glass Half Full Lifestyle.

Our Daily Action Steps Are To:

  • Commit to taking 5 minutes each morning as you begin your day to read the daily quote.
  • If you are moved or inspired by the quote; share it in an email, phone call, conversation, text, tweet or on your social media network or platform. When we share something, it becomes more real to us.
  • In your own words write in a journal how the quote or thought applies to you or your circumstances, today. If it doesn’t write on your page the first thing that comes into your mind after reading the quote.
  • The end of the day, prior to bed, take 5 more minutes for yourself. Re-read the quote again and write or think of how you applied or took an action today with a person, situation or referenced the daily quote in mind. Reflect on the day, was there any event in the day where your thinking was impacted differently because of the quote or the affirmation.
  • Let’s have fun with the system and commit.
  • Now, Let’s begin with today’s affirmation:
“POSITIVE THINKING WILL LET YOU DO EVERYTHING BETTER THAN NEGATIVE THINKING WILL.” ZIG ZIGLER

Beginning of Day: How’s the above quote apply to me or what comes to mind when reading the quote above?

End of day: Re-read the quote. Did I share the quote or apply any of its meaning into any part of my day? What issue or situation made me think of or refer to the quote above? Did it help me bridge a positive outcome or mindset?

We encourage you to write or journal your thoughts or reflections on today’s quote.

“POSITIVE THINKING WILL LET YOU DO EVERYTHING BETTER THAN NEGATIVE THINKING WILL.” ZIG ZIGLER

It’s your life, express yourself as your true and honest self and let’s work together for self improvement and a Glass Half Full mindset.

Author Chris Edwards lectures, has his podcast and writes. His book series 90 Days to a Glass Half Full Lifestyle is 3 part series that garnered much acclaim from many coming out of rehab and those coming out of incarceration and beginning anew. His other book series, book 1 Coach Bob Sepulveda The Early Days is an inspirational sport history of interscholastic sports in New Mexico. All of his books are found at fine independent book sellers such as Roadrunner Emporium, 928 New York Avenue, Alamogordo, New Mexico and available via Amazon in 36 countries.

Listen to our report and positive affirmations via our paper:

https://2ndlifemediaalamogordo.town.news/g/alamogordo-nm/n/28261/positive-news-daily-affirmation-4-25-21-28-days-habit-90-days-lifestyle